Attack Time

If it’s Wednesday night, then it must be time to get out and do some writing.  Of course I was out to Panera, for soup an a grilled cheese sandwich, and bottomless ice tea to quench my thirst.  See here . . .

You can't see food, but it's there.  Well, almost.

You can’t see food, but it’s there. Well, almost.

I had a bit of writing to do, because it was the start of Chapter Twenty-Two, otherwise known as Attack.  Simple and too the point, don’t you think?  The scene in question is Sky, because that’s where it takes place, up in the air.  Way up . . .

You’ll notice each scene will have a time stamp.  Every event in this chapter happens over the course of one and a half hours–really closer to an hour and forty-five minutes, but hey.  Particularly in the first four scene there is some overlap, so it should help the reader know that things are happening during these moments.  And if I want to pull them out, I can.  Very simple, yes?

Let’s find out what’s going on?

 

(All excerpts, this page, from The Foundation Chronicles, Book One: A For Advanced, copyright 2013, 2014, by Cassidy Frazee)

17:00 to 17:08

The sun was low in the sky and deep twilight was falling over Cape Ann and the school. Normally Kerry loved this time of day, but when one was flying around the inside of the walls looking for possible intruders, the gathering darkness made it difficult. The forest on both sides of the wall were steeped in gloom, and the contrast between the still-light sky and the darkness at ground level made using his goggle’s low light function difficult.

For the last ten minutes Emma and he were looking for any kind of movement rather than individuals. They figured someone making a quick move could be spotted easier—and then Kerry remembered how good Annie and he were getting at the Light Bending spell, and figured any Deconstructors hiding beyond the wall were probably far better than him.

Kerry sensed Emma getting eager for the upcoming rest break. She’s been fairly quiet throughout the day, and went right to a nap when they set down at Laputa for their fourteen to fourteen forty-five rest. Kerry figured she was busy doing her job, but there was a small part of his mind that kept flashing back to the question she asked on the observation platform during their first break. Is she really upset because I told her Annie is my soulmate? It puzzled Kerry, because Emma had to know, after seeing them together for the last two months, that Annie and he were together . . .

 

Kerry the eternal clueless dude, trying to figure out what’s on Emma’s mind.  Better off trying to figure out your own, dude.  Besides, Emma’s got something else on her mind:

 

Emma took that moment to clear her throat. “Kerry?”

“Yeah?” He kept his eyes focused on the lightly marked route and the wall tower ahead.

“Do you really think they’re going to make us fly at night?”

He’d half expected this question at some point during the last twenty minutes. They were told during their last rest that as things stood, it looked as if the emergency would continue into the night, and at that point Emma developed a rather disturbed look . . .

“We said we’d fly patrol, didn’t we?” Kerry looked over and gave her a smile that he knew she could see because his face was in light.

“Yeah, but . . .” She looked down to her right into the gloomy forest. “We’ve never flown at night.”

“It should be that hard; we can see the path, and we have night vision on our goggles.” He nodded towards the screens. “We should be able to see that better, too.”

“That’s what the professor said.”

He set up for the turn. “Double Dip tower . . . turn right now.” He swung out wide so there wasn’t a chance he’d run into Emma as she completed her turn. “If they’re going to sit us down, it’ll happen at our next rest.”

“Which should be in the next fifteen, twenty minutes—” She quickly glanced over to Kerry. “Right?”

Kerry almost laughed. “You in a hurry to get out of the sky?”

“No, it’s just—” She hunched her shoulders. “It’s getting colder.”

“Yeah, a little. It is getting . . .” As he was already looking somewhat off to the west Kerry noticed the strange lines rising up from the ground—no, they were too far away for that. Are they coming out of the ocean?

He got on the comm instantly. “Nightwitch, this is Myfanwy. There’s something strange happening in the west beyond the school; looks like it’s coming out of Ipswich Bay. Over.”

Seconds later another voice took command of the conversation. “All flights, this is Fortress. Hold your positions. Over.”

 

Yeah, you wanna fly, you gotta take the good with the bad–and that means flying at night, in the cold, even in the rain if necessary.  Just be glad it isn’t December . . .

In case you’re wondering where this is happening, I did a quick little diorama for you.  Because when you have a three-dimensional map of your school, anything is possible, right?  Here it is.

The scene of the crime, so to speak.

The scene of the crime, so to speak.

For a little reference, the walls are fifteen meters, or fifty feet high.  That pole–atop which sit Emma and Kerry–is one hundred and fifty meters, or four hundred and ninety-two feet, high.  And they’re not really flying west, but more southwest, but because of the swing around the tower, Kerry was facing west.  I got this, you know?

What’s coming next?  This:

 

Team Myfanwy pulled back on their brooms and came to rest one hundred and fifty meters near the northernmost turn of Green Line’s Double Back. Emma now saw what Kerry has noticed. “What are those?”

There thin, dark lines rose into the sky seeming to towers hundred of meters over Kerry’s position. He wondered how no one in the Cape Ann area could see these lines—but if The Foundation can hide the entire school . . . “I have no idea, but . . .” He gulped. “I don’t like it.”

“I don’t either.” Emma leaned forward over her broom. “Are they . . .” She sat up quickly. “Kerry.”

I see.” The line were no longer rising into the sky: they’d begun to pitch towards them and the school. The far end of the lines were now visible as the fronts approached the screen. When they were maybe a half a kilometer away Kerry was able to tell that the line on the left was heading off south of them, while the middle line was heading somewhere to their north—

He followed the line to his left and saw once it was within a hundred meters of them that the line was comprised of hundred—maybe thousand—of creatures. Kerry couldn’t make them out clearly, but he knew there was as far from anything human as possible . . .

His stomach seemed to dropped out of his body as the creatures slammed into the outer screen.

 

This is what the Deconstructors were waiting for:  sunset and a hell of a lot of reinforcements.

 

The area around the impact point flared as brilliant sparks of mystical energy flowed into the area to hold back the horde. The same thing happened to the north as the middle line of created did the same, and he figured the third line was striking the screens far to the north. The screen around them shook and wavered, flexing towards and away from them. The screen was no longer a dim red, but was shifting up and down the spectrum from black to a bright orange.

There were bright flashes outside the screen at the point of impact. Remembering what Annie and he had gone over in Advanced Spells just last Wednesday, he had a sickening feeling that what he was seeing . . .

The screen seemed to erupt inward and a number of creatures—he didn’t know how many—flew into the school grounds. At the moment of the eruption Fortress was on the comms. “We have a breach; we have a breach. Go to ground; go to—”

A tremendous yellow flash filled the sky over the southern school ground. The goggles compensated for the flash and Kerry recovered his sight immediately. No more creatures were entering the school, and the few that had appeared to be heading for cover. But something else caught his eye: the flight team on the High Road ahead and to the south of them. Both were falling out of the sky, their brooms tumbling beside and behind them. They were flailing their arms as they felt towards the trees—

 

And they get what they want:  penetration of the outer defense screen and access to the school grounds.  And for a couple of unlucky students, it looks as if they won’t need to study no more.

Which means things aren’t looking too good for Team Myfanwy.  This is what plays out until the end . . .

 

Kerry.”

The panic in Emma’s voice was enough to snap him out of his shock. He wasn’t facing her when she nearly screamed at him. “The enchantment: it’s loosing power.”

His eyes were drawn to his own HUD because a set of yellow numbers were counting down rapidly as a message in white shone next to them: Levitation Enchantment Power Level.

They were losing power. The enchantment that kept them flying was draining faster than it could be replenished by their bodies—

56 . . . 53 . . . 49 percent.

They were on the west side of the school, far from Carrier, farther from Laputa. They could depart at full speed—

43 . . . 39 . . . 35 percent.

—but there was no way they were going to make it. Kerry figured flying at full speed would drain the enchantment even faster, and when it was gone, then they would crash and . . .

31 . . . 27 . . . 24 percent.

He closed his eyes—

Do you both want to be good sorceresses? Then remember to keep your wits about you while everything it going to hell around you, and you’ll remain in control of any situation. There are no other rules.

He snapped opened his eyes.

21 . . . 19 . . . 16 percent.

There was no other choice.

He barked at his wingmate as loud as possible. “Emma.” He jabbed a finger straight down. “LAND NOW.”

 

Fourteen hundred and sixty-eight words.  A good output for a good scene.

More to come.

You can bet on that.

Talks Among the Ins and Outs

The new day is here, and there is a feeling of getting things done today.  Don’t know why–maybe I just woke up in a good mood.  It’s always a plus to have that happen.

But there was also writing last night.  Lots of writing.  You want proof?  Here:

See?  I wouldn't lie.  Much.

See? I wouldn’t lie. Much.

Almost twelve hundred words to finish up the last scene in Chapter Twenty-One.  Not only that, but the novel is over ninety thousand words, and I’m creeping up on another milestone here, which I’ll discuss in a moment.

But first, the writing . . .

There’s a five-way conversation going on in this scene.  Isis and Wednesday in the Security Center, Ramona Chai and Fitzsimon Spratt, the Practical Super Science instructor, on the ground at the scene of the break-in, speaking through a couple of magical floating cameras/monitors, and the Headmistress in her lair in Sanctuary.  Question of the hour is:  how did they break in?  Answer . . .

 

(All excerpts, this page, from The Foundation Chronicles, Book One: A For Advanced, copyright 2013, 2014, by Cassidy Frazee)

The Headmistress glared at all through the video display. “You have an explanation for what happened, Isis?”

“I do.” She’d seen this demeanor many times before: she called it the “Mean Headmistress Look” and it only appeared when the Mathilde didn’t want to leave any doubt as to who was in control of the conversation.

“And?”

“The computer analysis shows the Deconstructors threw a number of people as a small spot on the screen, one right after another, in an attempt to hammer through a breach.”

“When you mean ‘one right after another’—”

“I mean they teleported people into the same spot on the screen in a matter of about ten second. As soon as one person hit the screen, another was right behind them, doing the same.” She turned and indicated Wednesday. “Wends has looked at the data as well, and agrees with that analysis.”

On the Monitor Two Fitzsimon—who was sending and receiving images from a Spy-Eye, one of several that the Rapid Response kept on hand for this sort of thing—raised his hand. “If I may something, Headmistress.”

Mathilde softened her glare a little. “Go ahead, Fitz.”

“Ramona and I have had a chance to examine both bodies.” The Self Defense and Weapons Instructor nodded from Monitor Three, watching and recording about six meters from Fitzsimon. “It looks like the body I’m standing over—the one that wasn’t retrieved by our stone friends—”

Isis spoke up. “That would be Gahooley.”

This gave the opportunity for the Headmistress to sigh loud enough for all to hear. “Is it actually necessary to give all the gargoyles names?”

“I find it necessary.”

 

Leave it to Isis to name “her” gargoyles.  And should we ask how it is she’s come into command of gargoyles in the walls, because if she’s giving one a name, there are probably more out there.  In a way it’s kind of scary.

But they get back to the matte at hand:

 

“Thank you.” He glanced at the body lying on the ground but didn’t kneel, knowing the Spy-Eye would follow if he did. “Of the two who made it through, this one appears in the worst shape: burnt by the energies in the screen, and missing part of his right arm.”

“He’s the one that was DOA coming through.” Isis wanted the Headmistress to know that even with a breach, the effort wasn’t a complete success.

“Yes. But . . .” Fitzsimon’s turned back to the camera. “He was wearing a device, and it’s obvious it was imbued with an enchantment.”

This was of interest to both the Headmistress and Wednesday, though the Mathilde was the first to speak. “What sort of enchantment?”

“It’s difficult to say right now; there’s only the lingering presence of an enchantment.” Fitzsimon shrugged. “Isis, Wednesday: did you see anything in your data that indicated a drain spell was used?”

Wednesday was slow to respond, as if she was going over what she’d viewed from the computers trying to see if she missed a key bit of evidence. “I didn’t see anything that stood out as a drain spell, but . . .” She turned to Isis and shrugged. “If they were throwing themselves against the screen trying to hammer it down, the energy flares could have covered it up. Particularly if it wasn’t a large spell.”

“It wouldn’t have to be large. If it was formed correctly, it’d end up being like a shape charge.”

“Yeah.” Isis shrugged. “But you couldn’t use a lot of them; too much of a chance you’d waste them before you hit the screen.”

Fitzsimon nodded. “Absolutely correct.”

 

There you see magic being used for practical effects–magical shape charges, if you will.  And now coming the whys and wherefores of how they got in, plus a little digging from the Headmistress.

 

The Headmistress wanted to get back to the point which originally brought this conversation together. “What I see here is the outer screens were breached and intruders entered the grounds. Isis, you said this wasn’t possible.”

“Headmistress, I said the screens as they are now would make nearly impossible to get into the grounds—” She wasn’t about the let Mathilde put words in her mouth and then hold her to something that was never said. “There is no such thing as a perfect defense, and I’ve said this more than once, if you’ll recall.”

“What does this mean, then?” Mathilde didn’t want more bad news.

“It means the Deconstructors have noticed a weakness and tested it to see if it was viable.” She pointed at a spot on the hologram of the school grounds behind her. “The entered near The Narrows, so my guess is someone was over in the observation tower in Halibut Point trying to see how it all played out.”

 

Is there really an observation tower over at Halibut Point State Park, at the northern most point of Cape Ann?  Do you really have to ask?

 

“Which means they know they can get in—”

“Maybe.” Isis shook her head. “They’ll also know it’s not worth their time.”

“Explain.”

Isis was glad she’d taken the time to memorize the data before having this conversation. “The data indicates thirty-three people hit the screen in the same place trying to hammer it down. Two made it through, and one of those was dead on arrival.” She looked up at Monitor Three. “Ramona, the guy who made it through alive—how was he when you got there?”

“Once your—” She was loath to the name given to the gargoyle by Isis. “—’pet’ returned the individual, he remained alive about fifteen seconds. And he wasn’t in much better shape than the individual Fritz is standing over.”

Mathilde didn’t bother hiding her surprise. “He died?”

“Yes.”

“What if you’d arrived before the gargoyle had gotten to him? Would you consider him a threat?”

Ramona looked off to the side for about five seconds before staring back into the Spy-Eye. “No, Headmistress. Given the extend of his injuries, any one of the Rapid Response team could have handled him without requiring magic. He wasn’t in any shape to put up a fight.” She glanced in the direction of the wall. “I believe he would have died, gargoyle or not.”

 

Gargoyle or not, you’re gonna die.  It’s all a matter when you’re trying to bust into the school of if you want to die sooner, or later.

What is the response to this?  Isis isn’t too worried, and Wednesday, the Second Witch in the Security Center, has got her ideas down:

 

“And we could act against them instantly.” Isis felt she’d covered all her points and was ready to move on to the end of this conference. “The one good thing to come out of this is Wends thinks she can modify the existing enchantment to make the screens harder to breach.”

With this news Mathilde no longer felt the need to seem the stern administrator. “What will you do?”

“I can make a slight adjustment to the enchantment so that if it detects as massive pin-point assault against a single area, more energy will get rushed to that spot.”

“How long will this take?”

“I’ll need about ninety minutes to work up the spell and test it. After that I just need to go down to the master node and rework the enchantment—that’ll take five minutes, no more.” Wednesday smile was friendly and relaxed. “Easy peasy.”

 

Just as long as you didn’t say “okely dokely”.  That might have been too much.

The high point too all this is I’m heading into Chapter Twenty-Two, where things get bad.  That’s where this second graphic comes into play:

Just look at the numbers, Lizzy.  Look at the number . . .

Just look at the numbers, Lizzy. Look at the number.

I’ve come within striking distance of 241,450 thousand word.  The longest thing I’ve ever written, Transporting, topped out at around 245,000 words.  That means sometime during Chapter Twenty-Two I’m not only going to pass that novel, but I’ll hit a quarter of a million words.

More importantly, the end of this Act is in sight.

Then . . . we’ll see.

Living Beyond the Walls

I’ll tell you, I had every intention of getting into writing last night.  Computer was ready, I was ready, there was nothing on television, I was ready for music and typing out words.

But life never lets you do what you want to do, right?

As I’m leaving work I check my phone and find I missed a call.  I check it, and it’s from the place where I was getting my new glasses from, and they tell me they’re it.  So I get home, get ready–just to even go out a have to get ready a little–and head out.  Fortunately traffic isn’t bad, but I still have to make a run to somewhere on the north side of the city.  And I notice that traffic going into the city is bad because of a wreck.  Not something good, particularly when things are backed up for miles.

I get my glasses–yeah, they look great . . .

Oh, and new earrings, too.  Wonderful.

Oh, and new earrings, too. Wonderful.

. . . and after picking them up I decides I need to pick up a few things at Target, and then get something to eat.  I wasn’t planing on staying out long, but I didn’t want to try and fight my way back through the traffic, so I took my time with my dinner.

By the time I rolled back to the apartment to snap the above picture, it was about eight PM.

Then I had to roll out and do something on Facebook, because I’m hosting a book club this month, and I had to set up which three books people can choose from.  Since I’d made my selections months ago it was just a matter of doing the ol’ cut and paste and getting things in place before setting up a poll, but it still took time to get that and the notifications together.  And as soon as I finished getting that set up–

The questions came.

Because they always do when there’s a new book.  Because people want to know things, they have interests in what you’re presenting.  I should have known, but sometimes I can be . . . clueless.  It’s not an easy feeling.

Oh, and I didn’t mention the PMs from people wanting to get together in a couple of weeks.  Did I mention that?  No.  I have now.

This is life, and it’s something I haven’t experienced in a bit.  It’s where unexpected things jump out at you and you do what is necessary to handle them.  My plan had been to come home, start dinner, get the book club stuff set up, eat, then write.  Silly me:  what did I know?

It’s a nice change up to be able to do something unexpected–and I had been waiting for my glasses for a few days, so there was a bit of excitement there.  I just didn’t expect it all to happen like . . . this.

Writing tonight, I promise.  I’ve got Isis trying to explain a school break-in where there shouldn’t be one, and gargoyles hiding in the wall.  I’ll get back into my fantasy . . .

And hope that life doesn’t throw a curve at me tonight.

Defenders Inside the Wall

If it seems like the writing has been light of late, you’re right:  it has.  I didn’t write at all Friday, my output Thursday was light, and yesterday I finished up the shortest scenes in this current chapter.  Personal and mental issues have been a bitch this week, but today . . . yeah.  I’m feeling much better.  I have one scene remaining to round out Chapter Twenty-one, and that’ll lead up to Chapter Twenty-two, Attack, which is where everything goes to hell.

But right now, it’s a good morning.

Look at that smiling face.  How could anything be wrong with that my awesome going on?

Look at that smiling face. How could anything be wrong with all that awesomeness going on?

So where are we?  Well, Annie cursed some smart mouth girl who decided to keep taking about That Girl–no, these kids have no idea who Marlo Thomas is–and then lay down, knowing she couldn’t get the images out of her head.  As for Kerry–hey, it’s out flying.  Still.  Let’s check in, shall we?

 

(All excerpts, this page, from The Foundation Chronicles, Book One: A For Advanced, copyright 2013, 2014, by Cassidy Frazee)

 

Kerry was getting cold once more. Emma and he were coming up on ninety minutes in the air since leaving the Observatory after their rest, and since then the sky had become overcast and the wind had picked up to the strongest it’d been all day. Though it was near the mid-fifties in temperature, the lack of sun and the wind turned the air cooler than it really was.

He put it out of his mind and kept his eyes peeled on the ground.

Emma and he were on the Low Road, taking the left turn at Sunrise Tower that would take around toward the Narrows. Even though they were still above the outer wall, being this close to the tree tops seemed to cut down on some of the wind coming out of the west. Or it could all be physiological, like being higher made you feel cooler.

He didn’t have time to think on the matter: The second left-hand turn was coming up.

Yeah, just because you love to fly, it doesn’t mean you’re going to like flying this stuff.  Kerry figured it out early:  it’s a job.  There are expectations, and you damn well better met them.  And at this point you can’t ask to sit down, ’cause if you do you’re screwed for anything else you want to do in the future.  You’re labeled a slacker from there on out, and that’s not a good thing.  Not at this school.

Don’t worry, however:  things are about to get interesting . . .

 

There was a flaring of light in the screen about five meters above the wall and some thirty meters before reaching the Narrows turn. Kerry was on it instantly. “Carrier; Nightwitch, this is Myfanwy. There’s something happening on the screen just above the wall.”

The response on the general channel didn’t come from Carrier or Nightwitch, however. “All flights, this is Fortress. Hold your positions; repeat, hold your current position.”

Kerry brought his PAV to a stop in mid-air; Emma pulled up alongside. He continued watching the flaring on the screen for a few seconds before seeing the flaring grow brighter and then appear to push through to the inside. “Fortress, this a Starbuck. Something just came through the screen.”

Emma reported in as well. “Confirmed, Fortress.” She scanned the forest before. “Fortress, I see someone on the ground.”

I see someone as well.” Kerry noticed someone close to the wall, lying still, and noticed another person, maybe five meters from the first. “We have two inside.”

If Isis was worried by the report she didn’t allow those emotions to appear in her voice. “Myfanwy, this is Fortress. We see them: please stand by.”

 

There you have it:  break in, just as the scene says.  So you got a couple of eyes in the sky watching at least one guy walking around inside the school grounds, but Fortress is on the case.  And that leads to this . . .

 

Something massive stepped out of the wall behind the Deconstructor and leapt at him. The man half-turned before he was knocked to the ground and nearly trampled by the huge, four-legged wingged creature, which to Kerry looked exactly like a—

Emma held onto her PAV tightly. “Kerry, di-did you s-see that?”

“Yeah, I saw it.” He looked over to his wingmate. “That was a—”

 

Yeah, Emma, what was that?  Unfortunately, there are ears everywhere.

 

“Myfanwy, this is Fortress.” Like before Isis’ voice was clear and calm. “I’m switching to the private channel; standby one.”

Kerry looked straight ahead waiting to see what Fortress wanted, feeling the bottom of his stomach dropped down below his broom saddle. He figured what Emma and he was about to have relayed to them might not be good . . .

“Selene, Starbuck, this is Fortress.” Kerry shot another look at Emma, who was staring back with a look of semi-fear on her face. “There are some things around the school grounds I’d rather not become public knowledge.” Kerry was now watching the presumably stone creature return to the wall with the body of the Deconstructor in its mouth. “What you witnessed was one of them.” The creature walked into the wall, merging with it seamlessly, taking the Deconstructor inside. “I would appreciate you both keeping quiet on this matter. Do you copy? Over.”

Kerry understood his options: he could say yes and it was pretty good odds that he’d remain in the air, or he could say no and . . . the likelihood that he’d be ordered to head to Laputa or Carrier and then, from there—who knew? He stared off into the distance. “Fortress, this is Starbuck. I copy. No talking on this end. Over.”

“This is Selene, Fortress.” Kerry didn’t look at Emma, but he picked up on the slight quiver in her voice. “I copy as well. All is good. Over.”

“Roger that. Switching off from private.” A few seconds later Isis was back on the general channel. “All flights, this is Fortress. You may resume patrols. Over and out.”

 

“Yeah, kids, we got monsters in the wall, and we’d like it if you keep your mouths shut.”  And given this is a school full of witches, if you don’t keep your mouth shut, they can probably do more than sit you down.  And who wants to take that chance?

Kerry’s cool and wants to get back to what they’re doing, maybe put in another hour of flying because heading to Laputa for another forty-five minutes of R&R.  However, he is flying with That Girl, and while she said one thing, he mind’s somewhere else . . .

 

As they pushed their brooms forward towards The Narrows, Emma reached up, touched her helmet and turned off the comm. “Kerry—”

They slowly rounded The Narrows before Kerry switched off his own comm. “What?”

“That was a gargoyle.”

He nodded slowly. “Yep.”

“Doesn’t it bother—”

He shot concerned look her way. “We’re not suppose to talk about it.”

“We’re not on comms.”

Kerry waited a couple of beats before answering. “You sure?”

Emma didn’t bother answering. She turned her attention back to the route unfolding before them and reactivated her comm—

 

Gargoyles.  I love them.  I used them in Her Demonic Majesty, and the wee beasties are hanging out in the school walls here, too.  And while Kerry might be a tad clueless at times, he’s smart enough to know that just because the comms are off, that doesn’t mean that someone–like, say, Isis, the Goddess of School Security–might still be listening in on a conversation.  So be content that you got to see a gargoyle, Emma, and keep your mouth shut.

The last scene, which I hope to start sometime today, involves the instructors, Isis, and the Headmistress, discussing how someone could get past their defenses and gain entry to the school grounds.  Not everything is as it seems; there are things at play, and they’ll make sense once I have it written out.

At least that’s my hope.

Just like gargoyles, there are things you haven’t seen yet.

Affirmations in the Morning Light

There are demons who follow everyone around.  Not demons in the sense that creatures from Hell as tip-toeing about in your shadows waiting to snag your soul when you least expected it; after all, it’s hard to tip-toe when you have hooves, ’cause that clopping makes a hell of a noise.  I know, ’cause I used to be a demoness in Second Life–let me tell you, finding a pair of boots was hell.  True, pure, hell.

I have demons of a different kind.  They whisper in my ear and tell me what a load of crap I am, and then giggle at their own inventiveness.  They run you down as much as possible and twist your head around so much you look like you came out of rehearsals for The Exorcist.  Just once I’d like to get a succubus come and visit me, but that’s asking for too much, I suppose.

The demons came for me yesterday, and it was a close thing.  They hit me at work, and never let up, keeping my heart in a constant state of feeling like it wanted to leap out of my body and run for cover.  That is one of the worst feelings in the world, and after you’ve suffered with it for a few hours, you want the pain to stop.  It didn’t, and it wouldn’t.  It lay there like a dull ache, a rotted remnant of all the past pain through which I’ve suffered over the years.

It finally grew so bad I made a comment to some of my Facebook friends.  It was one of those cryptic statements that gets people wondering what the hell is going on.  I made a few, then left.  I figured I’d stay off Facebook for a while, come back when I got home–after I chased the demons away–and then go back and apologize later.  Little did I know the storm I’d set off . . .

I have friends, people who started calling each other and discussing the fact they thought they were something wrong with me, and the finally found the one people who, if they talked to me, would find out what was bothering me.  Yep–that person.  You know who . . .

The story has a happy ending.  After many tears were shed and words exchanged, I settled down, I got my head together, I shot a video for my friends explaining what happened and what I was feeling, and everyone felt better when it was all over.

But there was something else taken away from it all . . .

In my current story, in the scene where Annie visited Kerry in the hospital close to the time when everyone’s suppose to go to bed, she tells Kerry he’s worthy of love.  he so used to not receiving affection that her words strike him hard.  He’s never imagined that he was worthy of anything much less love.

One of the things I was told last night is that I have to learn to love myself.  I need to be selfish and put myself ahead of my love for others and make sure I remind myself, day and night, that I’m freakin’ amazing, and that I love myself.  And I realized that’s something that Kerry doesn’t understand–not yet, at least.  Even later in his relationship with Annie, he’s yet to figure out that he’s worthy of his own love.  He doesn’t realize that if he doesn’t love himself, all he’s leaving for Annie to love is an empty, dead shell of a person.  It’s why he feels such insecurity in later stories; it’s why he lets his parents treat him like an outsider.  He hasn’t figured out that while he has Annie’s love, in order to survive, he needs his own love.

I’m getting better.  I love someone, but I’ve found it hard to love myself.  But with the hormonal changes, with the continuing transition, I’m now getting in touch with the person I’m suppose to really love.  I don’t want to be a shell any longer; the deadness inside is no longer desirable–

It’s time to tell the demons to take a hike and let me love the one who needs my love.

Though if a nice succubus wants to stick around, I won’t complain . . .

Kerry probably sees this in the morning, too.  It's a good feeling to know you're seeing it with someone you love.

Kerry probably sees this in the morning, too. It’s a good feeling to know you’re seeing it with someone you love.

From the Space and Time to the Sensuality

First there will be some geek talk, and then I’m Bringing Back Sexy in an open and honest way.  If you don’t want the sexy, read the two paragraphs after this one and bid the page Audios!  No harm, no foul, and You Have Been Warned.

Onward.

 

 

For the last few days I’ve found myself in some rather interesting conversations.  Naturally, because of my geeky nature, and those of others I know, we’ve chatting up a lot of Doctor Who this week because it’s time to come up with another Doctor, and for us who are into this sort of thing, we like to talk about it.  It also helps that BBCA has been running shows all week, so that gives us the opportunity to re-watch episodes that we’ve already seen a dozen times, and snark on about what we like and what we don’t like.

"Seriously, she thinks Rose is the best?  I'm gonna have to set this bitch straight, won't I?"

“Seriously, she thinks Rose is the best companion? I’m gonna have to set this bitch straight:  that’s what The Internet is for!”

It’s been a lot of fun chatting this stuff up, particularly since I consider myself to not only be an expert on the show–because I’m old and from Chicago, which was one of the only places that used to air the show in North America in the 1970’s and 1980’s–and because I’ve personally turned a few people onto the show over the years and made them nearly as geeky as me.  Nearly, I say.  That means when the lowdown on trivia is needed, and information is required for aspect that elude others, I’m the Go To Girl for All of Time and Space.  Just call me Idris, because I may as well travel around like that.

It’s a lovely diversion, but it’s not the only one . . .

‘Cause now comes Sexy Time.  You want more?  Come on in.

 

You ready?  Let’s go, let’s go.

 

. . .

 

. . .

 

. . .

 

There’s another conversation I’ve been falling into as well, and that’s something we, in the one group I’m in–are calling our “Sex Education Talk.”  Though “sex education is really a bit of a misnomer:  it’s more like the ladies getting together and talking about kinky-ass sex–in some cases actual kinky ass sex.  It’s really been all over the place, particularly in the area of toys, which seem to get used a lot.  I don’t have a problem with toys, or lotions, or wearing articles of clothing to help ramp up the passion and sensuality, or just the out-and-out Let’s Get Down and Bang This Gong feeling that’s gonna hit in any second now.  Particularly this last, because if they’re one thing I love, it’s sexy clothing or night gowns, or even a bit of fetish wear if you can find some that (a) fits and (b) doesn’t feel like you’re encased in something unyielding.  Unless that’s exactly what you want . . .

"Hi, honey.  Guess what's for dinner?  Tacos!  You better say yes if you know what's good for you--"

“Hi, honey. Guess what’s for dinner? Tacos! You better say ‘I’m so hungry’ if you know what’s good for you–“

It’s refreshing to sit and read some of the things my lady friends have experienced, some of the wildness they’ve gotten into, and some of the advice they have for those who may be less experienced in this area.  Because if there’s one thing we’re not open about is sex.  Particularly these days, when you have buttheads running for public offices who say watching women walk around topless will lead to men becoming gay.  Dude:  projection is a total bitch.  You should do something about that.

I haven’t said much about sex in the group simply because most of what I know these days ends up on the printed page.  Sure, I’ve written erotica, most of which is pretty strange, and probably goes well beyond anything my friends would ever consider–unless it is their total kink to turn into a human-like centaur with the fully functioning genitals of both genders, and then have a couple of women get down on them.  Then they’re right up there in my ballpark, ’cause that’s how my mind works.

I am happy to know sexy is alive and well with all kinds of people, but I’m also a little saddened because it’s not something I experience.  Intimacy is something I haven’t known in some time, and likely isn’t in the cards for some time to come.  That’s kinda of choice, and it’s . . . well, complicated, just like time travel.  The reasons for it I won’t divulge, but needless to say depression played a part there, a singular lack of love played another part–and these days I’m so uncomfortable with my body that it’s difficult for me to think about getting intimate with myself.

I’ve had the “sex talk” with my HRT doctor.  We’ve discussed the changes I’m going through, which is really nothing short of Puberty Mk 2.  My doctor is also trans, so she’s been through the same thing I’m going through, and had some advice for “exploring,” if we wish to call it that.  My reactions are decidedly feminine these days; stimulation starts in different places within the body than where they happened before.  There are physical reactions now that were never present in the past, and with continuing hormone treatment those reactions will become more pronounced and intense.

I did reassure my doctor that I wasn’t about to go running around town looking to score because that’s never been my style.  I’ve always been tentative about meeting other people face-to-face, and I’ve always been uncomfortable about my body and putting it on display for others.  Even more so now, because with the physical changes I’m also experiencing the insecurity that comes with those changes.

While I would love to get a sexy night gown and feel good about myself, I’m afraid I wouldn’t, just because it’s hard for me to feel that way.

This is my idea of sexy night gowns, though my sack of potatoes body wouldn't look nearly as nice in this one.

This is my idea of sexy night gowns, though my sack of potatoes body wouldn’t look nearly as nice.  Also, I’ll do without the Hello Kitty slippers as well.

It’s taking time to get to the place where I’ll be as comfortable talking about vibrating rings and beads and schoolgirl outfits as my friends–though I really sort of see myself as the domineering Headmistress in the corset dress wearing her shiny black boots, so watch out, girls.  That doesn’t mean I can’t write about it, and I have developed some good ideas that could turn into short, hot stories.  And once I’m though with this monster of a novel I could just do that–

Or maybe I should jump in and write about a woman who spends so much time in a sexy crocheted body suit that she just can’t find the time to take it off–

Hey, you should hear some of my other ideas.

Dark Witch Rising

Twenty-four hours can bring about a nice change.  As I said yesterday, sometimes you need to get out and change things up a bit, just to make things better.

That’s sort of what I did yesterday.  I got home from woke, changes, threw on my jean skirt and a nice top, put on my sandals, checked my makeup, and headed out.  I needed to pick up a few groceries, but since I intended writing first, I stopped at Panera to set up the computer and get something to eat.

And with the eating and a little social media out of the way, I put on a live recording of The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway, recorded at the Shrine Auditorium in late January of 1975, and got to town.  I didn’t leave until just over two hours later, when I was thirteen hundred words into the scene, and and it was finished.  I was proud, because this scene needed to get finished.

Writing looks easy, but believe me, being in a public places allows you to drown out all other distractions.  Um, yeah.

Writing looks easy, but believe me, being in a public places allows you to drown out all other distractions. Um, yeah.

See, this scene is all about Annie.  Unfortunately for her, Nurse Thebe blabbed to the other girls about Annie being an amazing zombie killer, and how she worked up an Air Hammer spell in a matter of seconds while hordes of the undead–okay, four–bore down upon her.  When you get that sort of hype laid upon you, naturally others want to see you in action.  Since Annie was told not to use the spell on anyone living–since she could like, you know, kill them–a subject was needed . . .

 

(All excerpts, this page, from The Foundation Chronicles, Book One: A For Advanced, copyright 2013, 2014, by Cassidy Frazee)

Sahkyo pointed at the hovering nurse. “What about Thebe? She’s not human.”

Annie was going to explain why using Thebe as a test subject was out of the question when she addressed the subject. “I may not be human, but I can be damaged. Nurse Coraline wouldn’t appreciate my being put out of action because of a spell.”

Annie nodded slowly in the nurse’s direction. “Thank you.”

“On the other hand . . .” Thebe looked over her shoulder. “I do have something Annie could use as a test subject.”

Nurse Thebe headed over to where the stretchers sat and returned with one. She set it upright, floating a few centimeters above the floor. “You can use this.”

Annie didn’t want to show off, not for these girls, not for the nurse, either. “I don’t want to damage it—”

“It’s made of carbon mesh suspended between carbon-carbon fiber poles.” Thebe shook her head. “One can support a ton. You’re not going to damage it.” She let her fingers glide over one of the poles. “And it’s floating, so there’s no resistance. It’ll simply fly backwards.”

 

Sure, don’t hurt the artificial person (or AP), but beat up on those stretchers all you want.  Annie therefor bows to peer pressure and decides to give a quick demonstration.

 

 

She held her right hand at her side and relaxed. “Remember that to make this spell work, you gather air together at a point.” A small swirling ball began forming in the palm of her hand. “Once you have drawn it to your point, you pull it tighter, as if you’re squeezing it with both hands.” The ball began to shimmer as Annie used energy and willpower to compress the mass. “Then, when you are ready, you choose a target . . .”

Annie didn’t throw the air ball as much as she pushed her hand in the direction of the stretcher. She didn’t need to throw it; her willpower drove the Air Hammer forward faster than the eye could follow. Almost instantly the stretcher was struck with an audible thwack and thrown backward back into the far north wall of the Rotunda before bouncing off with a loud and and falling to the floor.

Neither girl nor Nurse Thebe said a word for almost five seconds. The first reaction came from Sahkyo. “Damn. That’s, um . . .” She tightly closed her eyes for several seconds. “The best I’ve ever done was little better than a breeze.”

“The energy required is minuscule.” Annie slowly turned towards the girls. “It’s all visualization and willpower—”

“And a lot of luck.”

 

And what’s a demonstration without someone coming in to mouth off?  Which is when Lisa shows up and starts talking shit.

 

Annie looked over her shoulder, half-turning to her right. Lisa was approaching the group slowly, her hands behind her back with her eyes turned towards the floor, and an unusual smirk upon her face, as if she knew something that she was keeping from everyone else.

Lisa stopped about five meters from Annie. “After all, isn’t that how you did that during class? You got lucky?”

“I don’t believe in luck.” Annie crossed her arms. “It had nothing to do with our coven test that day.”

“Not even a little.”

“No.”

Lisa shrugged. “Maybe not with you, but I’m guessin’ . . .” She half turned to her left, the smirk growing. “Kerry probably used a lot of luck to make that same spell work.”

Annie’s eyes narrowed. “Kerry is just as skilled; he doesn’t rely on luck, either.”

“So you say.”

 

Yes, she does say, Lisa, but that’s not going to keep you from not only mouthing off, but insulting others as well.

 

 

Thebe joined the conversation. “What you’re pointing out is wrong, Lisa.”

She turned on the nurse. “What would you know about it? You’re not even human.” The smirk returned. “You can only do magic because supertech allows it—right?”

Lisa’s last statement didn’t set well with Annie. She knew Thebe wouldn’t get angry—while APs could get mad in the right situations now wasn’t one of those—but that didn’t mean she couldn’t express her feelings. While she kept her tone normal, the words were spoken in a low, slow voice. “That’s not only a rude thing to say, it was stupid.” She decided to get in a dig of her own. “You sent two of your own covenmates to the hospital that day: you’re in no position to make light of the abilities of others.”

The smirk vanished as Lisa’s face froze into an unemotional mask. Only her eyes gave any indication there was something going on inside her mind. “That was an accident.”

“A preventable one if you’d bothered to think.” She slowly pulled her hair back and laid it behind her ears. “Don’t speak of others using luck when you couldn’t find any of your own.”

Annie is now the Queen of Zingers, which doesn’t set well with Lisa–

 

The stare Lisa affixed upon Annie turned deadly. She crossed her arms, flexing her fingers across her forearms. “So you think Kerry’s not gonna need any luck—” She nodded up towards the skylight. “Bein’ out there.”

Annie huffed. “He doesn’t need luck, Lisa. I’ve already said that.”

“Even if the bad guys come?”

“Kerry knows what to do if there’s trouble.” Annie returned Lisa’s deadly stare. “I’m not worried.”

“Not even a little?” Lisa tossed her head from side to side.

Annie breathed deeply through her nose. “No.”

“I mean a lot of things could happen.” She glanced up at the skylight once again. “These Deconstructors, they could fly through the screen and shoot him down—”

“Not likely.”

“Or they could take him out from the ground with a fireball or somethin’.”

Though she didn’t show it, Annie felt her irritation growing. “If there are any problems, Kerry will head for safety.” She’d discussed this matter with Coraline only an hour earlier, and knew what the fliers would do in the instance of major attack. “He knows what to do.”

“Maybe he does—” Lisa waited as Annie began to turn away. “That doesn’t mean Emma does.”

 

Oh, yeah:  you had to go there.  Just like Emma had to pull the trigger on “Is Annie your girlfriend?”, Lisa’s gotta jam that same button ’cause she knows a little something about what makes Annie’s mind start seeing bad things.  And she just isn’t gonna let up . . .

 

 

Annie froze in mid-turn. She swiveled her head around towards Lisa. “You don’t know—”

“I saw them leavin’ together; I’m guessin’ ol’ Salomon put them together.” The smirked turned to a tight grin. “Which means they’re probably flyin’ around, chattin’ up a storm—”

“Kerry wouldn’t chat up a storm.” Annie’s eyes were now dark hazel pinpoints. “He knows better.”

“Yeah, but what about Emma? You know—” Lisa held her hands out parallel to each other. “Miss ‘Hey Kerry, Come Race With Me’?” She pushed her hands together and made a crashing sounds as they collided. “You know how well he was listenin’ then.”

It took an bit of effort for Annie to dispel what she was feeling before speaking. “Kerry isn’t out there listening to Emma; he knows what to do.” She turned away from Lisa. “Nothing is going to happen.”

“Maybe you think so—” Lisa turned to follow Annie as she slowly walked away from the conversation. “But, you know, if things don’t happen to Kerry—”

Annie spoke without looking at her tormentor. “Be quiet, Lisa.”

“—that doesn’t mean somethin’ won’t happen to Emma—”

Annie stopped and looked over her shoulder, her eyes on fire. “Enough.”

“—and Kerry’s just stupid enough to help her—”

You shut up.” Annie spun around and pointed at Lisa, her face cold and hard, her eyes the only indication of her emotions.

 

Kerry likes to call Annie his Dark Witch for a reason, and Annie keeps telling him it’s not joke, that she does have darkness, that it’s not a game.  When she spins around and points at you and tells you to shut up in a low, harsh voice, shit’s about to happen.  What happens is Lisa is rendered mute.  Wanna guess why?

 

 

Thebe did a quick scan of Lisa’s face and throat. “What the—?” She turned the angry girl in the direction of the triage center. “Go sit down; I’ll be with you in a moment.” She waited for Lisa to stalk off out of earshot before approaching Annie. “What did you do to her?”

Nagesa and Sahkyo were right behind the triage nurse. Shakyo seemed shocked. “You cursed her, didn’t you?”

Ignoring the girl’s question, Annie spoke to Thebe. “I used Paralytic.”

Thebe’s eyes narrowed. “That’s sorcery.”

Annie nodded. “Yes, it is.”

Nagesa said nothing, but Sahkyo found it almost impossible to contain herself. “You’re not suppose to use sorcery on another student—” She turned to Nagesa. “Not outside the ring, that is.”

If Thebe was troubled by this information, she didn’t let it show. Her calm profession demeanor reassessed itself, and she took control of the situation. “She didn’t mean it, though.” The nurse positioned herself so she could face all three girls at the same time, and she kept her voice soft so it wouldn’t travel. “You both wanted to see the sort of spells Annie knew. She showed you Air Hammer, and you wanted to see more. She showed few others, but . . .” She glanced over her shoulder at the now-sitting Lisa. “One got away and paralyzed Lisa’s vocal cords.”

“It won’t last long either—” Annie gave the tiniest of shrugs. “She’ll be able to speak in a few hours . . . but it’s not like she needs her voice to do this job.”

“No, she doesn’t.” Thebe grew closer to Annie. “And you won’t do that again, will you?”

Annie didn’t blink. “I have no reason to now.”

“Good.” Nurse Thebe stepped back a few paces. “I’ll tell Coraline what happened after I look at Lisa.” She walked away without another word.

Annie didn’t bother following Thebe as she departed; she focused instead on the two girls who continued to stare at her with some disbelief. She finally cracked a slight smile. “Hope you saw enough.”

Nagesa nodded. “When did you find time to learn Paralytic?”

“I taught it to myself two years ago.” Annie spoke nonchalantly about the spell. “My mother allowed me to use a construct so I could test the spell.”

“You taught yourself?” Sahkyo almost yelped out her question.

“Yes, I did.”

“Damn, girl—” She swung back and forth, her face lit up. “You’re like Lovecraft, you know that?”

Annie chuckled softly. “I’m sure she’d consider that a complement.” She lowered her gaze slightly. “If you’ll excuse me—” She quickly pointed at the benches along the south wall of the Rotund. “I’d like to rest.”

 

Yes, consider it a complement when the upper coven levels start comparing you to the school’s Dark Mistress of All.  Though Helena might say something different . . . naw, who am I kidding?  She’d smile like mad knowing Annie cursed some loud mouth who wouldn’t shut up.  If the roles had been reversed, and Lisa was running off at the mouth about Erywin, Helena would have set her on fire.

Moral of the story:  never piss off the Head Sorceress.

So finally, three out of five scenes complete, Chapter Twenty-One closer to finished, and the attack is coming.  You know that because you can see the title on Chapter Twenty-Two.  Right?

Caption here

I’m nothing if not subtle.

The next scene should be short, and the last scene will get some staff and instructors talking.

And thanks to everyone who left me messages yesterday.  It’s nice to have supportive fans out there.