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The Creative Return

The brain is shaky today, because having four days off, and then forcing it to shift gears back into work mode, works against everything that nature says is right.  There’s a difference between being home and doing what you want to do that’s work-related, and having to drive into a location and having to sit and do things.

It’s wrong; very wrong.

I’ll get through the day, but I know what I’d rather be doing . . .

As I drove through the darkness my mind turned towards the upcoming story.  (Yes, it’s dark when I drive into work at 6 AM:  it’s also dark when I arrive home about 5 PM.  Gotta love the winter.)  There’s not much else to think over, as it’s all been thunk.  I can say that, right—thunk?  Well, I did, so we go on . . . at this point I need to set up my three main characters, and the four characters who more or less show up to fill in the background while having speaking roles.  This is how I get into my work:  by figuring out what I need, then going for it.

I think I’ll start on that part tonight, getting the names and descriptions down.  My main female character, the muse in questions, needs a definitive look, and I’ll write that up in her notes just so I can keep it straight in my mind when I’m telling her tale.  Because this is about her, and her charge, and the magic they make together.  But it’s a lot about her, and what the creative process does to her.

A real muse would always seem to be giving, so what do they take from the creative process?  The satisfaction of a job well done?  Most of the time the person doing the creating is going to take all the credit—though they might say something like, “Oh, my muse was there to help”—but most of the time the poor muse is left out in the cold with little to wrap about her body to keep her warm against the chilly breeze of creative nothingness.  What does she take from the event she helps ferment?

Even though this will be something of an erotic story—hey, why not?—I do hope I can show the loneliness of the long-suffering muse.  Because they must suffer, knowing that what they are helping bring forth isn’t always going to be a best seller, or a work of greatness . . . it’s what needs to some out at the right time for the person in question.  At least that’s what I’m seeing; you, dear reader, may have a completely different concept in mind.

Strangely enough, the story didn’t start out this way, but it’s how I see it now.  A good part of the focus is on the muse, though her charge will be on the stage as well.  It’s about them, because they have to work together to create something worthwhile.  Something that is going to touch you . . .

Which is what I’m hoping to do with this story as well.

All I can do is try.

2 thoughts on “The Creative Return

  1. Hey this is some blog you got here. So what are we aloud to ask? I seen your Gravatar over at Eda’s blog http://rosedeny.wordpress.com. Will OK I seen the red hair, so I got curious.

    Anyhow, I use my words through cooking. I find recipes and write them into my cookbook or I make them up with my imagination. All in all you can say it’s words on paper that end up on your plate as a delectable gourmet dish. I even coined the quote “Food is the picture of a 1000 words”.

    Cassidy Frazee I would like to invite you to my blog. Maybe you might see a recipe that could inspire your next novel or short story. While you are there sign up to follow, it’s FREE.

    I look forward to your next post. Thanks for sharing your imagination and blog with us.

    Chef Randall
    savorthefood.wordpress.com

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