Constructing the Walls of a New World

The weekend was one of business and writing, among other things.  I started playing with Daz3D, and it didn’t take me long to realize that I need to work with the training videos, because I stumbled about for about thirty minutes before realizing I had no freakin’ idea what I was doing.  You graphic models, you know how to drive me crazy.

I got into writing Chapter Ten–and, man, is my muse a nasty person when she wants to be.  Not only that, but she’s a potty mouth, big time.  Probably picked it up during the Dark Ages, you know?  The story continues, and I understand why there is so much hesitation with my storytelling these days:  this is a somewhat dark tale, and there is a lot of unhappiness ongoing.  I’m not good with unhappiness  but I admit it exists, and you have to work it into your writing.  No, it’s not all rainbows and unicorns:  most of the time it’s a lot of pain, and I’m starting to feel it now.

On the other hand I could write about virgins having sex with their stepparents . . . naw, I think I’ll leave those masterpieces for the amateurs.

As the night wore on, I discovered I had–here it comes–nothing to do.  I mean, that does happen from time to time, but last night it was driving me a little nuts.  I was finished with writing for the evening, and if it hadn’t been so late I may have added a few hundred more words, but they wouldn’t have been good words, so no point there.

That was when I started talking . . .

See, someone I know on Facebook, another writer who is starting her research on her story, wanted to know if she could pick my brain in a non-zombie way about something science fictiony.  I said sure, go for it.  With that, we got into a discussion about what would happen if the moon were much closer to this planet, or if the moon were, say, twice as big, and what it would do to the Earth–or another Earth-like planet similar to one a reader might find in a story.

I love this sort of thing, building systems.  I don’t claim to have all the math right all the time, but it’s a good experience  letting you mind wander and imagining what could happen if this were in place.  So I started talking about Roche Limits, about higher tides and fewer ice ages because the primary is going to be more stable.  I spoke about how shorelines will look difference because of more erosion, and how the day will be longer because the moon is slowing the primary down.

I asked a few more questions, the made the offer:  give me some broad outlines about what you want, and I’ll put the system together for you.

See, I am a nice person.  Just ask most anyone.

Now I wait and see what comes my way.  After that, I start working things out, and before you know it, another system will be out there shining.

We need all the light we can get.