Attack Time

If it’s Wednesday night, then it must be time to get out and do some writing.  Of course I was out to Panera, for soup an a grilled cheese sandwich, and bottomless ice tea to quench my thirst.  See here . . .

You can't see food, but it's there.  Well, almost.

You can’t see food, but it’s there. Well, almost.

I had a bit of writing to do, because it was the start of Chapter Twenty-Two, otherwise known as Attack.  Simple and too the point, don’t you think?  The scene in question is Sky, because that’s where it takes place, up in the air.  Way up . . .

You’ll notice each scene will have a time stamp.  Every event in this chapter happens over the course of one and a half hours–really closer to an hour and forty-five minutes, but hey.  Particularly in the first four scene there is some overlap, so it should help the reader know that things are happening during these moments.  And if I want to pull them out, I can.  Very simple, yes?

Let’s find out what’s going on?

 

(All excerpts, this page, from The Foundation Chronicles, Book One: A For Advanced, copyright 2013, 2014, by Cassidy Frazee)

17:00 to 17:08

The sun was low in the sky and deep twilight was falling over Cape Ann and the school. Normally Kerry loved this time of day, but when one was flying around the inside of the walls looking for possible intruders, the gathering darkness made it difficult. The forest on both sides of the wall were steeped in gloom, and the contrast between the still-light sky and the darkness at ground level made using his goggle’s low light function difficult.

For the last ten minutes Emma and he were looking for any kind of movement rather than individuals. They figured someone making a quick move could be spotted easier—and then Kerry remembered how good Annie and he were getting at the Light Bending spell, and figured any Deconstructors hiding beyond the wall were probably far better than him.

Kerry sensed Emma getting eager for the upcoming rest break. She’s been fairly quiet throughout the day, and went right to a nap when they set down at Laputa for their fourteen to fourteen forty-five rest. Kerry figured she was busy doing her job, but there was a small part of his mind that kept flashing back to the question she asked on the observation platform during their first break. Is she really upset because I told her Annie is my soulmate? It puzzled Kerry, because Emma had to know, after seeing them together for the last two months, that Annie and he were together . . .

 

Kerry the eternal clueless dude, trying to figure out what’s on Emma’s mind.  Better off trying to figure out your own, dude.  Besides, Emma’s got something else on her mind:

 

Emma took that moment to clear her throat. “Kerry?”

“Yeah?” He kept his eyes focused on the lightly marked route and the wall tower ahead.

“Do you really think they’re going to make us fly at night?”

He’d half expected this question at some point during the last twenty minutes. They were told during their last rest that as things stood, it looked as if the emergency would continue into the night, and at that point Emma developed a rather disturbed look . . .

“We said we’d fly patrol, didn’t we?” Kerry looked over and gave her a smile that he knew she could see because his face was in light.

“Yeah, but . . .” She looked down to her right into the gloomy forest. “We’ve never flown at night.”

“It should be that hard; we can see the path, and we have night vision on our goggles.” He nodded towards the screens. “We should be able to see that better, too.”

“That’s what the professor said.”

He set up for the turn. “Double Dip tower . . . turn right now.” He swung out wide so there wasn’t a chance he’d run into Emma as she completed her turn. “If they’re going to sit us down, it’ll happen at our next rest.”

“Which should be in the next fifteen, twenty minutes—” She quickly glanced over to Kerry. “Right?”

Kerry almost laughed. “You in a hurry to get out of the sky?”

“No, it’s just—” She hunched her shoulders. “It’s getting colder.”

“Yeah, a little. It is getting . . .” As he was already looking somewhat off to the west Kerry noticed the strange lines rising up from the ground—no, they were too far away for that. Are they coming out of the ocean?

He got on the comm instantly. “Nightwitch, this is Myfanwy. There’s something strange happening in the west beyond the school; looks like it’s coming out of Ipswich Bay. Over.”

Seconds later another voice took command of the conversation. “All flights, this is Fortress. Hold your positions. Over.”

 

Yeah, you wanna fly, you gotta take the good with the bad–and that means flying at night, in the cold, even in the rain if necessary.  Just be glad it isn’t December . . .

In case you’re wondering where this is happening, I did a quick little diorama for you.  Because when you have a three-dimensional map of your school, anything is possible, right?  Here it is.

The scene of the crime, so to speak.

The scene of the crime, so to speak.

For a little reference, the walls are fifteen meters, or fifty feet high.  That pole–atop which sit Emma and Kerry–is one hundred and fifty meters, or four hundred and ninety-two feet, high.  And they’re not really flying west, but more southwest, but because of the swing around the tower, Kerry was facing west.  I got this, you know?

What’s coming next?  This:

 

Team Myfanwy pulled back on their brooms and came to rest one hundred and fifty meters near the northernmost turn of Green Line’s Double Back. Emma now saw what Kerry has noticed. “What are those?”

There thin, dark lines rose into the sky seeming to towers hundred of meters over Kerry’s position. He wondered how no one in the Cape Ann area could see these lines—but if The Foundation can hide the entire school . . . “I have no idea, but . . .” He gulped. “I don’t like it.”

“I don’t either.” Emma leaned forward over her broom. “Are they . . .” She sat up quickly. “Kerry.”

I see.” The line were no longer rising into the sky: they’d begun to pitch towards them and the school. The far end of the lines were now visible as the fronts approached the screen. When they were maybe a half a kilometer away Kerry was able to tell that the line on the left was heading off south of them, while the middle line was heading somewhere to their north—

He followed the line to his left and saw once it was within a hundred meters of them that the line was comprised of hundred—maybe thousand—of creatures. Kerry couldn’t make them out clearly, but he knew there was as far from anything human as possible . . .

His stomach seemed to dropped out of his body as the creatures slammed into the outer screen.

 

This is what the Deconstructors were waiting for:  sunset and a hell of a lot of reinforcements.

 

The area around the impact point flared as brilliant sparks of mystical energy flowed into the area to hold back the horde. The same thing happened to the north as the middle line of created did the same, and he figured the third line was striking the screens far to the north. The screen around them shook and wavered, flexing towards and away from them. The screen was no longer a dim red, but was shifting up and down the spectrum from black to a bright orange.

There were bright flashes outside the screen at the point of impact. Remembering what Annie and he had gone over in Advanced Spells just last Wednesday, he had a sickening feeling that what he was seeing . . .

The screen seemed to erupt inward and a number of creatures—he didn’t know how many—flew into the school grounds. At the moment of the eruption Fortress was on the comms. “We have a breach; we have a breach. Go to ground; go to—”

A tremendous yellow flash filled the sky over the southern school ground. The goggles compensated for the flash and Kerry recovered his sight immediately. No more creatures were entering the school, and the few that had appeared to be heading for cover. But something else caught his eye: the flight team on the High Road ahead and to the south of them. Both were falling out of the sky, their brooms tumbling beside and behind them. They were flailing their arms as they felt towards the trees—

 

And they get what they want:  penetration of the outer defense screen and access to the school grounds.  And for a couple of unlucky students, it looks as if they won’t need to study no more.

Which means things aren’t looking too good for Team Myfanwy.  This is what plays out until the end . . .

 

Kerry.”

The panic in Emma’s voice was enough to snap him out of his shock. He wasn’t facing her when she nearly screamed at him. “The enchantment: it’s loosing power.”

His eyes were drawn to his own HUD because a set of yellow numbers were counting down rapidly as a message in white shone next to them: Levitation Enchantment Power Level.

They were losing power. The enchantment that kept them flying was draining faster than it could be replenished by their bodies—

56 . . . 53 . . . 49 percent.

They were on the west side of the school, far from Carrier, farther from Laputa. They could depart at full speed—

43 . . . 39 . . . 35 percent.

—but there was no way they were going to make it. Kerry figured flying at full speed would drain the enchantment even faster, and when it was gone, then they would crash and . . .

31 . . . 27 . . . 24 percent.

He closed his eyes—

Do you both want to be good sorceresses? Then remember to keep your wits about you while everything it going to hell around you, and you’ll remain in control of any situation. There are no other rules.

He snapped opened his eyes.

21 . . . 19 . . . 16 percent.

There was no other choice.

He barked at his wingmate as loud as possible. “Emma.” He jabbed a finger straight down. “LAND NOW.”

 

Fourteen hundred and sixty-eight words.  A good output for a good scene.

More to come.

You can bet on that.