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The Night Air: Embracing the Madness

It’s 15 F/-9 C outside, which means I’m gonna have a cold walk into work in about an hour.   It’ll be almost Annie and Kerry cold outside, but don’t worry:  I keep bundled up.

How I normally look walking back and forth to work this time of year.

How I normally look walking back and forth to work this time of year.

My coat even has a hood, so I could go flying if I wanted to fly–assuming, you know, that I had a broom or could fly like a bird like certain characters of whom I write.  But I can’t do that, so I have to deal with trudging around in the cold on foot.  Flying to work would be nice, since it’s only a mile away and I’d be there in no time.

Speaking of getting somewhere in no time . . .

The next part of the scene has been in my head for a long a long time–probably a bit longer than the “Resting in Fenway” scene as a whole.  I’ll get to the part I really love in a second, but here are the kids, with the music on, and it’s bringing back memories of a far warmer time than what they’re experiencing now:

 

All excerpts from The Foundation Chronicles, Book Two: B For Bewitching, copyright 2015, 2016 by Cassidy Frazee)

Annie couldn’t prevent the smile from appearing on her own face. Kerry’s reference wasn’t difficult to pick up: when they were together in Berlin, she’d played Muse’s song Madness more than a few times when they were in their hotel room—sometimes so much that she expected Kerry to make mention of the replays, or at the least roll his eyes every time began playing.

To her surprise he not only didn’t complain or mention the constant performances, but after a while Kerry actually appeared to enjoy the song, and there was one time when Annie came out of the bathroom and caught her soul mate reading the lyrics on his computer while the song played. The song played during the last Samhain dance, and Annie wondered if perhaps Kerry asked one of the instructors—maybe Deanna, though more likely Erywin—to play it early.

She leaned in close, stretching out her body so she was nearly perpendicular to her boyfriend. “You like this, hum?”

“Well . . .” He turned up the volume just a little. “It reminds me of a special few days.”

“Oh?” She moved her face closer to his. “I felt it was a special time as well, my love.” She touched the tablet display and turned up the volume as loud as possible, letting the sound fill the dark, empty stadium. “No one around to hear—”

“Only us.” Kerry sat back in the broom’s saddle with his eyes half-closed. “A long way from summer in Germany.”

“I have on my charm bracelet; that means it’s always summer no matter where we are.” Annie slipped through the air until she was hovering over the end of his broom. “And no matter what is happening with these dreams, know I’ll always be here for support.”

Kerry grinned as she semi-mimicking the current lyric. “So is this real love, or is it just madness?”

Umnik.” For the first time since leaving the school she flipped back the hood of her coat. “You know better than that.”

 

What Annie said there was “smart ass”, but the literal translation is more like “big nerd”, showing that Annie can swear and be on point the whole time as well.  We’re heard Annie swear before, but usually she just calls someone a bitch, and that usually comes right before she starts to light them up.

This scene does relate back to the days when the kids were in Berlin, way back in the early parts of Act One.  And it also relates back to the song mentioned in the scene.  This was another one of those, “Ah, ha!” moments for me, because when I decided to use this song in the background of the story, I first saw it in this scene, which then set me to wondering, “How did it get there?”  A little quick research showed that the song was released just the week before my kids hit The Big B, and knowing Annie’s taste in music is a little more modern than Kerry’s, I had no problem seeing her dancing around her room and the lake house while getting ready to leave for school with her dancing around to the beat–something she’s already told us she does.

Pretty much a Chicken coming before the Egg moment, wouldn’t you say?  First I see the scene in Fenway, then I think of the song, and then I incorporate how the song came into my kid’s lives before I write the scene in which that happens.  Yes, my mind works in strange ways.

Oh, and here’s the tune in question, in case you want to imagine what’s happening next with a little music to make it complete.

For your interesting worthless fact of the day, if you played the video, you heard a distinctive “Bromm bromm bromp” through much of the song.  The instrument making that sound is a Misa Kitara digital MIDI controller, which looks a lot like a tablet surface built into a guitar, and is played a lot like one, only instead of strumming strings, you run your fingers over the tablet.  Now you know something you likely didn’t a few minutes before.

Annie has her hood back–what could that mean?

 

“Yes, I do.” Kerry flipped back this coat hood as well, exposing a relaxed face and affectionate eyes as the song segued into the guitar break. “So much, Sweetie.”

She twisted her body around until her feet were away from Kerry and appeared to be swimming towards him. Isis said that first day we were mermaids of the air. The song reached the crescendo as she pushed with her arms towards him, as if she were moving through water.  I am more than that.

Annie whispered a version of a line from the song while centimeters from his face. “Imam nuzhda ot vashata lyubov, skŭpa moya.” She took hold of the collar of his coat and turned her head as her lips met his. She felt the music swell around them as she held the kiss while floating together meters above the ground. She didn’t want to break the kiss; she wanted to hold it, to press it into herself and keep it there through the winter, into the spring, and take it home for the summer—

I love him so much. My soul mate; my husband to be. She finally broke the kiss so she could stare into his eyes—

Kerry sighed as his head tilted back, enraptured in ecstasy. He took Annie in his arms and clenched her tight. “Will come to me in my dreams—” He whispered into her ear. “Will you come and rescue me?”

Annie pulled herself against him tight. “I will come anywhere to rescue you, my love.” She kissed him again. “Anywhere.”

The song finished and Annie looked up as she found them surrounded in silent. “A little more of this—” She reached down and stopped the music stream. “And a little more of this.” She took his face in her hands as she kissed him once more.

 

Leave these kids alone for a few minutes, and before you know it the lip locking is underway.

Leave these kids alone for a few minutes, and before you know it the lip locking is underway.

 

 

Now . . . what Kerry said there at the end goes back to one of the lyrics of the song.  What is sung is, “Come to me/Trust in your dream/Come on and rescue me”, and some people–if they were, say, a writer–would say that’s foreshadowing.  Perhaps they’re right.  Perhaps they’re not.  Only I know for sure.  Bwah, hahahaha!

Annie also said something, more or less, from the song.  Her whispered line is, “I need your love, my darling,” which is something that’s sung after coming out of the instrumental bridge, and happens when the song moves towards the crescendo.  Her love, her soul mate . . . her husband to be.  Annie’s always got her eyes on the prize, and at that moment she had him right there, all alone in the dark in a baseball stadium.

There isn’t much left to this scene, but I have to say:  after waiting just about a year to get it written, I’m finally glad to have made it real.  Now if I could only get someone to draw a picture of the moment.

That would be perfect.

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