Bimillennium

You waited and waited, and here it is:  post Number 2000.  So of course it’ll be called what it’s called, because that’s what you get when you have two of a thousand, yeah?

But this the real deal:  two thousand posted, most of which were written with maybe a few dozen reblogged.  I’ll take that, because most of those reblogs were mine, and after tomorrow’s post–which is gonna be a play on another famous title–I’ll do a Gish Gallop on stuff that I’ve written but not reblogged, which are mostly my recaps over on The Snarking Dead.

But you didn’t come here to read about that, right?  No, there’s something else here–

"Oh, look:  Cassidy finally decided to treat us to her work.  About time."

“Oh, look: Cassidy finally decided to treat us to her new work. About time.”

 

That’s the real reason, for today C For Continuing starts excerpting, and at the rate I’m writing I’ll run out of things to excerpt in a few days, because I was only able to write another five hundred words last night.  Don’t worry:  I’ll get into gear.  I promise.  There’s a thousand word night in me somewhere.  Which I’m gonna need because right now my average is well below what I normally do.

But enough of that.  Since everyone waited I figured I’ll throw all of the first scene out for you to read and try to sate your appetites.  Here it, first draft as always, and right off the bat you get into what’s most important at this point in my kids’ story . . .

 

(The following excerpts from The Foundation Chronicles, Book Three: C For Continuing, copyright 2016 by Cassidy Frazee)

What bothered Annie Kirilova the most this morning was the weather. She had hoped for a bright sunshine, but what she received instead was light rain and low cloud cover. The rain also had the temperatures hovering in the low teens Celsius, which kept her out of shorts and forced her into leggings to wear with her long, flowing top and black ballet flats.

Given what was going to happen, she wondered if the weather reflected he mood.

Standing before the large windows of her lake house, she saw that her tree was certainly reading her feelings. The leaves were a bright yellow when she arrived thirty minutes earlier, and now they were a muddy gold. It feels my concern: it knows this. Her mother had seen it as well, when Annie entered the kitchen as she came down the spiral staircase from her bedroom. While Annie was an expert at hiding her emotions, the last few years saw her mother becoming more adapt at picking up on them. She knew the reason why: puberty was having an effect upon her, and while it remained possible to keep her feelings invisible, strong emotions had a way of leaking through the outer façade.

And Annie’s emotions were growing stronger every day.

She turned away from the window sighing and checked the clock in the kitchen: 08:59. Annie wondered if her guest would actually turn up in the next minute as she was told that this particular person had a habit for punctuality—

The LEDs switched over to 09:00. Annie held her breath as she moved towards the dining table.

A few seconds later a shadow passed across the windows followed by a knock at the main entrance. Annie turned and nearly smiled. The stories are true, it seem. She hurried over and opened the door for her guest. “Won’t you come in, please?”

“Thank you, Annie.” Berniece Rutherford entered and paused for a moment as she examined the large, open space. She wore a light jacket over her tee shirt this Sunday morning, and her jeans and sneakers indicated she was anticipating a relaxing day. “So this is the lake house.”

“Yes, it is. I hope you like it.” Annie wondered how much Ms. Rutherford knew about this place. She was aware that as Kerry’s case worker it was necessary for her to receive numerous concerning things that happened to Kerry at school, and it was likely she’d read at least one report on their shared wedding vision—a fact of which she was certain the moment she noticed the young woman’s eyes lock upon the sleep loft in the back. She has to know everything.

Annie stepped closer to her guests and held out her hand. “May I take your jacket and purse?”

“You can hang up my jacket; I’ll keep my purse with me.” She shrugged out of it and stepped a couple of meters away from the door. “Are we sitting at the table or by the fireplace?”

Annie finished hanging the jacket. “By the fireplace, please. Would you like tea? I put a kettle on in anticipation.”

Berniece chuckled. “I would love some. Do you have breakfast tea?”

“Yes. Loose leaf.”

“You are ready. That would be fine.”

Annie gave a cut nod then went to the kitchen area to retrieve the kettle and prepare the infuser. She set both on a tray along with a cup and saucer and carried them over to where Bernice sat. Annie waved her hand over the kettle, which began steaming almost immediately, then slowly poured the tea cup just over three quarters full. “I understand you like milk in yours—would you care for some?”

“Yes, please.”

Annie levitated a small pitcher all the way from the kitchen and gently retrieved it in mid-air. Only after pouring in a small amount of milk did she offer the tea to her guest. “Here you are.”

“Thank you, Annie.” Berniece looked up, smiling. “You are quite the host.”

“Mama impressed upon me that we should always make our guests comfortable when they visit.”

Bernice watched the steam rising from the liquid’s surface. “Must have been a little tricky timing this coming to a boil right before my arrival.”

“No, it wasn’t.” Annie sat in the leather easy chair across the coffee table from the case worker. “I brought it to a boil maybe fifteen minutes ago, then placed a small time spell around the kettle to put it in stasis. As far as the contents of the kettle were concerned, maybe five seconds had passed before I removed the spell.”

Berniece gave an approving grin. “Did you learn that on your own?”

“No, Kerry taught me.”

“So your Time Lord is teaching you those spells. I guess you’ll be a Time Lady soon.”

Annie managed a slight smile at the reference while inwardly she groaned. In the last few months of their B Levels Kerry had become quite adept at quickly crafting a selection of time spells of all sizes, and had begun using them to speed up reactions in Advanced Formulistic Magic. Because of this ability, however, Erywin—who was as much a pop culture geek as her soul mate—began calling him the “Salem Time Lord” and openly joked that it wouldn’t be long before Annie joined him as a Time Lady.

She must have included that bit in one of her reports. Annie wasn’t sure if she should feel honored that Erywin was observant enough to take time to acknowledge these abilities publicly, of annoyed that she allowed her private jokes into official documents.

Annie decided to move away from any discussion of her ability with time crafting. “Is it raining in London as well?”

Berniece shook her head. “No, but it’s about the same temperature-wise.”

“Did you have trouble getting here?”

“Not a all. I took you advice: jaunted London to Sofia, had them jaunt me to Pamporovo, then hired a car to your house. Your mother didn’t seem at all surprised when I pulled up.”

Annie shook her head. “No. I’d told her you were coming. Did you walk down from the main house?”

“You mother jaunted me to the deck stairs. I think she felt it necessary that she not be seen.” Berniece sipped her tea. “Umm—that’s perfect.”

Annie settled back in her chair and tried not to be obvious about taking a deep breath before continuing. She felt there had been enough small talk already, and she wanted to get into the reason why she’d asked Ms. Rutherford here two weeks earlier. “If you wouldn’t mind—”

Berniece sensed Annie’s eagerness to start. “No, not at all.”

Annie crossed her legs. “How did it go?”

Berniece held her cup and saucer of tea steady in her lap. “It went about as well as I expected—”

 

Those last remarks should be familiar—

 

FADE IN:

INT. LAKE HOUSE INTERIOR — DAY

The camera centers on ANNIE KIRILOVA sitting in a large chair. She’s dressed casually and for the summer. She addresses someone sitting off-screen across from her.

ANNIE (IN ENGLISH)
How did it go?

QUICK CUT:
Sitting in another large chair across from Annie BERNIECE RUTHERFORD steadies her cup and saucer in her lap. She dressed causally in jeans and a pullover top, ready for summer.

BERNIECE
About as well as I expected.

 

—with just a bit of editing on Bernice’s line, because you can’t always get everything you want in a trailer, can you?

With the first scene coming on their return from school for the summer, and with me saying the next scene is a flashback, that mean what comes next must have to do with the other have of the Lovey Dovey Couples, otherwise why is Ms. Rutherford there?

I guess this means you get to begin seeing what happened to Kerry tomorrow–