Home » Creativity » Handling Change Like a Pro

Handling Change Like a Pro

Now, while I didn’t do a lot of writing yesterday, that doesn’t mean I wasn’t working at writing.  See, I was down in the editing, trying out a new writing tool:  ProWritingAid, which is found online and for which I’m supplying a link.  This came recommended to me by another writer, and for those of my friends who also write I’m recommending it to you.

See, I know I’m not a perfect writer.  Sometimes I’m not even a good writer, and sometimes I’m a lazy writer because I’m tired and I’m just trying to make a word count.  There are things I do in my writing that aren’t right, and though I do my best to prevent that from happening, things slip through.

So having this tool is nice.  At the moment it’s a web application, but there is a desktop version currently in beta testing that will be availble for a licence fee of $40 a year.  Depending on how much you write, that $40 might be worth it.

Usage is simple.  First you cut and paste what you want analyzed into the window on the first page:

Here's a few words I just finished writing.

Here’s a few words I just finished writing.

Then hit the big green button and wait for your report.

Which you may or may not want to see.

Which you may or may not want to see.

I enjoy seeing the overused words, because know there are words in my lexicon that end up being rode like a lathered horse in my novels.  Under Writing Style Check you can see I have repeated sentence starts, which is probably due to using the word “she” time and again in this particular piece.  I have an issue with sentence length here, but it’s the opposite of what I normally get, which is three or four sentences that are too long.  Here they are two short, and that’s probably due to the amount of dialog used in that particular excerpt, which does not involve a character named John Galt.

This has helped me catch and clean up more than a few issues, and I’ll use it on the scenes I’ve already edited in A For Advanced while running my new work through it as well.  It might not make me a perfect writer, but I’m betting it’ll make me a better one.

Speaking of writing–

The last few days have seen us reading about what happened to Kerry on his big Coming Out Night, and we’ve went from “I’m a witch” to “Oh, shit!  You’re a witch!”  And given that at least one third of the Malibey clan is just a tinsy bit high strung it’s not surprising that shit goes off the rails fast:

 

(The following excerpts from The Foundation Chronicles, Book Three: C For Continuing, copyright 2016 by Cassidy Frazee)

“I see.” Louise folded her hands across her lap and stared unfocused into space. “I need you leave.”

“I beg your pardon?” Ms. Rutherford cocked her head to one side. “Is there a—”

“I need you to leave.” Louise straightened as her eyes turned cold. “I want you out of this house, and I want you out now.”

Even before picking up Kerry this evening Ms. Rutherford had known there was a possibility things might not work out for the best, and events seemed to be taking a turn in that direction. It wasn’t her intention to argue or make Kerry’s parents see reason: her only concern was being with Kerry during his reveal and making certain he was aware of his options should the situation at home grow worse. “I understand.” She reached for her handbag which was on the floor. “I’ll be on my way.”

Wait.”

 

Ah, the old Facebook trick of getting ready of telling someone to leave a group, but then taking a few minutes to get in a few verbal licks before kicking them to the curb.  Good thing Ms. Rutherford isn’t on Facebook, though she is completely aware of how this trick usually plays out, because it’s been used in movies a million times–

 

Ms. Rutherford never liked situations where she was told to do something, then ordered to do just the opposite. It usually never went well. “Yes?”

“I want you to tell whomever it is you report to that I am not happy with what transpired tonight.” Louise paused to take a breath as she appeared to try and control herself. “I’m not happy with what I’ve learned today, and I’m certainly not happy that we’ve been lied to by your organization. I am particularly upset with the fact that we’ve had no input on our son’s education, and that your school feels they are the only one with an opinion here.”

“I’ll let them know.”

“Also—” Louise’s green eyes took on a dark hue. “Let them know that we are going to seriously reconsider allowing Kerry to return in the fall.”

What?” Kerry was almost out of his chair after his mother’s comment. “You can’t—”

 

Oh, please Kerry:  you knew this was coming.  And you had to expect what follows:

 

Shut up.” His mother’s eyes flashed anger as she jabbed a finger at her son. “This is partially your fault for not saying anything.”

“What was I supposed to say? That I was a witch?”

“You can be quiet—”

You wouldn’t have believed me if I had told you.”

SHUT UP. We’ll discuss this later.” Louise was on her feet facing Kerry’s case worker as Dayvn looked on embarrassed. “You can go now.”

 

Yes, Kerry, it’s your fault you’re a witch!  And you didn’t tell Mommy, so double your fault.  However, that doesn’t mean your case working doesn’t have a parting shot–

 

“Very well.” Ms. Rutherford got to her feet slowly. “One last thing before I leave—”

“What is it?”

“The Foundation believes that only among his own kind—among other witches, that is—will he flourish. They’ve already seen him grow both in both skills and personally, and they feel this will continue until he graduate.” She lowered her voice slightly. “Trying to prevent Kerry from returning to Salem would be a mistake, and The Foundation would take an extremely dim view on that action.”

Dayvn finally stood next to his wife. “Is that meant to be a threat?”

“Simply a statement of fact, Mr. Malibey. Nothing more.”

“Never the less—” He pointed towards the kitchen. “As my wife said, you need to leave.”

“And I will.” Ms. Rutherford turned to Kerry. “You’ll be all right?”

He looked up and nodded. “I’ll be okay.”

“He’s not your concern.” Louise now stood face-to-face with the Foundation witch and acted as if she were about to give the woman a push. “I’ll show you to the door.”

“That won’t be necessary.” A slight grin formed in the corner of Ms. Rutherford’s mouth. “I’ll show myself out—”

 

It’s official:  the Malibey’s have gone all Vernon and Petunia Dursley on their boy and are not happy there is a witch in the house.  Given that they’re always seemed a bit distant from their son anyway, Kerry will probably take this all in stride and chalk it up to more parental bullshit he needs to deal with.

However, Berniece Rutherford is speaking with Annie, and she will know the whole story of how Coming Out Night went.  She also knows how crappy Kerry is treated, and that Mommy Malibey has struck Kerry on occasion only because she can, and that’s something that doesn’t sit well with the Soul Mate of Pamporovo.  So one has to wonder:  how much longer before Kerry’s mom figures out that this Girl Who Writes is also a witch, and when does she discover that’s Annie’s also the Witch Who Can Blast You Through a Fucking Wall If You Piss Her Off?

"Hi, Mrs. Malibey.  I hear you have a problem with my soul mate--"

“Hi, Mrs. Malibey. I hear you have a problem with my soul mate–“

I have a feeling Annie will be one wife who doesn’t put up with bullshit from her mother-in-law…

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9 thoughts on “Handling Change Like a Pro

  1. Things are about to get deadly. I have a feeling Kerry’s not only going to stand up for himself, he’s going to make it clear that his parents (either of them) will not be in charge of his education or what he makes of himself from here on out. He’s grown so much! ^_^

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