Home » Creativity » The Language of Dreaming

The Language of Dreaming

Since getting my new phone I’ve been using it every day at work to listen to music.  Streaming music over my laptop was something I did regularly at my last two jobs and it was something I missed one I started working in PA because YouTube and a lot of other streaming sights are blocked.  However their guest wifi isn’t, and once I’m in da house I have the phone going.  I also have a USB charger so my phone doesn’t drain out and die.

But the last few days I’ve turned on my data stream and listened to music while first walking back from work, and yesterday walking to work.   Once I hit the edge of Capitol Park I thought, “I need a song that will show me how long it takes to walk from here,” and wouldn’t you know, there are seventeen minutes songs from my past that will tell me exactly how long it takes to walk.

That’s why Dogs by Pink Floyd was my morning walk soundtrack on the way to work yesterday.  And needless to say it’s a lot of fun imagining things while I blocked out the world and existed in my own little cocoon of sound.

Actually, I’ve also taken to keeping my phone on and the earbuds in when I’m walking about the office these days.  Since no one speaks to me anyway, why not?

Speaking of speaking–

 

There was something else that I thought about during the creation of this scene.  And it came about because of something Annie did.  Something she always does if you try to wake her…

 

 

(The following excerpts from The Foundation Chronicles, Book Three: C For Continuing, copyright 2016 by Cassidy Frazee)

 

“I’m nowhere near as good as you—” He brushed her hair away from the left side of her face. “But by the time we returned to school we should be able to do this a couple of times a week.”

“That will be fantastic.” Annie gave Kerry a long, loving kiss. “Soon we’ll never be apart.”

 

“Well—” He chuckled. “At some point you’ll get tired of seeing me all the time.”

“Maybe a hundred years from now.” She closed her eyes as Kerry kissed her for what seemed like a long time before breaking. “Maybe.”

“We’ll see.” He looked to his left and right. “So this is your bed.”

Now that we totally know the kids are going to be spending all the time together:

Yes, how so?  Stop with the sucky face stuff, kids, and get to the point.

“You are so getting tired of me being in your dreams…”  “Maybe in a hundred years–”  “Let’s find out.”

Oi, you two.

And yes, Kerry:  this is her bed.  How’s it look?

 

“It is.” She sat back against him. “The one I’ve told you about so many times.”

“Do you have a canopy bed out at the lake house?”

“In my bedroom? Yes.” She looked up. “There’s something so feminine about having one.”

“I can see that.” Kerry continued stroking Annie’s hair as he spent a moment taking in her scent that he now knew so well. “It was interesting to hear you mumbling in your sleep even though it was in a dream.”

“Oh?” She looked up and to her left. “It’s funny how we do so many things from real life in our dreams.”

“It is. What was even better is I could understand you this time. It’s like you knew I was coming.”

“Are you sure?” She slid her fingers along Kerry’s hand. “I know I mumble when someone is trying to walk me up—I’ve had that habit ever since I was a little girl. But I wouldn’t mumble in English: it’s not my native language.” She stopped what she was doing and sat up. “Wait—” She turned towards Kerry. “What language am I speaking?”

“English.” He looked slightly perplexed. “You’ve always spoke English.”

“But I wasn’t that good with English until I was almost nine.” Annie looked away for about five seconds before snorting. “I never realized it until now.”

“Realized what?”

“That every time we’ve been in a dream you speak Bulgarian.” Her second snort quickly became a laugh. “I never thought about it because it seemed—”

“Normal.” Kerry chuckled along with his soul mate. “Just like me hearing you speak English: I just assumed you did.”

“Interesting. The brain must translate what is said in the dream so that anyone there hears it in their own language.” She slide closer and took his right hand. “How else would they be able to speak to each other?”

“So we have translator microbes in our brain.” He laughed. “Cool.”

Annie looked at him strangely. “What do you mean?”

“It’s another geek reference.” Kerry gave her a quick kiss and slid towards the edge of the bed. “Come on: I want to show you something.”

 

 

It goes without saying that they always understood each other when they were in dreams, and now we have proof:  Annie admits she wasn’t proficient with English until about the time Kerry arrived in Cardiff.  That means when Kerry read to her the first time while she understood every word during their dreams, in real life it would have been more like this:

Annie:  “Hello.
Kerry:  “Hi.”
Annie:  (Points at book)  “Kakvo chetesh?”
Kerry:  “Um, what did you say?”
Annie:  (Shaking head)  “Az ne znam Engliĭski. Znaesh li Bŭlgarski ezik?”
Kerry:  “What?”

 

So much for that first-time romantic moment.

Tomorrow begins the history lesson.  Well, a little of it.  But it has to do with what Kerry wants to show Annie.

Believe me, it’s coming.

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “The Language of Dreaming

  1. Sometimes when people don’t talk to you, you have to make the first move and say hi, I said Hi everyday to my bosses mom for almost a year before she finally said hi back and started talking to me. persistence can pay off, I know we get older and think, who gives a shit, but being alone all the time isn’t good for us either. We love you Cassidy!

I Want to be Part of the Craziness! Let Me Say This:

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s