How Super Was My Lab: About This Extra Work–

So here we are, Day Four of Cassie’s Big Week of Excitement, and while I didn’t officially go out last night, I did go down to have dinner and ended up sitting next to a woman who’s a lawyer who’s been working in Harrisburg for a few weeks and was getting ready to return to her regular office in Reading.  After I returned home I wrote my weekly Humans recap, then headed off to bed before the massive wind storms hit us.

Which they did.  And woke me up at a little before four in the morning.  So I’m kind of running on empty at the moment as is nearly six now and I know I’m going to need coffee before I get into work.

What excitement awaits me tonight? I have a political get together which is being held at another person’s house.  I should be home before nine, which will allow me and hours so to get in some writing before heading off to bed.  Tomorrow night me walk down to the local coffee shop to watch a band play between seven and nine, and Saturday night I will be heading out to Carlisle to see a performance of The Vagina Monologues, which I’ve never seen.  And that will be it: no more excitement plan for this week.

I may actually be able to work on my novel.

And speaking of that novel, I’m still stuck down in that goddamn superlab and my kids are finding there were cubicle. Is anything interesting going to happen to them?  What you think?

 

(The following excerpts from The Foundation Chronicles, Book Three: C For Continuing, copyright 2016, 2017 by Cassidy Frazee)

 

Annie and Kerry found her cubicle quickly: there is was the second cubicle down on the right from the personal rest area. It was much like the cubicle they used in transformation class with one exception: where those cubicle walls stopped at about mid-chest level, a meter of safety glass continued upward and there was a sliding door on the outside of the cubicle that could be used to seal it off from the rest of the lap. Annie suspected this was in place as a safety measure in case there was an accident in the lab and students were unable to get out through the airlock. It was likely that in that instance once the door was sealed shut, a stasis enchantment would go in place over the cubicle freezing time for those inside and preventing them from being harmed.

She was about to ask Kerry—who was busy checking the computer system—when Annie realized Erywin was standing just outside the cubicle looking at them. She smiled at her instructor. “Do you need us for something, Professor?”

“As a matter of fact, I do.” Erywin stepped into the cubicle entrance but did not enter the cramped area. “I actually need to speak with you, Annie, more than I do Kerry.”

Annie nodded. “What can do for you?”

“I’d like to discuss Alex Chorney.” Erywin held the tablet in one hand and used the other to grip the wrist. “You’ve spent the last three weeks tutoring her.”

 

First off, we find out that these cubicles are probably safety zones for the students in case something goes wrong in the lab.  We already know that there is magic that will basically allow you to freeze time around a person, and that same magic works for areas as well.  So each cubicle sort of acts like a panic room in case you are unable to leave the lab, and Annie is likely correct in assessing that once inside time stands and your prevented from being hurt by whatever’s happening outside.  So no worries: even if the building collapses around you and it takes people a week to get to your cubicle, as far as the people inside are concerned they just shut the door.

And second: Erywen wants to talk about a special pupil Annie is had for the last few weeks.  This brings up the situation that was discussed in Kiev between Alex and Annie about getting some tutoring, and since Erywen is asking about it it would seem that Annie did exactly as she promised…

 

“Yes, I have.” Since spending the last three Saturdays working with Alex in the Chemistry Building, she figured it wouldn’t be long before Erywin asked her what was going on. “I visited her over the summer and she asked if I would tutor her because she’s hoping to secure a spot in this class.”

“And you’ve been working with her since she arrived.”

“I’m not the only one—” She glanced to her right. “Kerry’s been helping out as well.”

Kerry nearly snorted. “I’ve been helping get things organized and assisting Annie where necessary, but she’s the one doing all the heavy lifting.” He leaned against the counter on his side of the cubicle as he turned to look at his soul mate. “Only telling the truth, my darling.”

Erywin chuckled. “It doesn’t matter whose doing the majority of tutoring: what matters is that it’s occurring.” She stepped into the cubicle and set her tablet down on the counter next to Kerry. “What do you think of her progress, Annie?”

Though she had on producing any reports, Annie had been keeping verbal notes on the classes on her phone so she could review Alex’s progress. “Her execution of formulas are not in question, nor is her knowledge. I think her biggest obstacle is she’s afraid she’s going to be allowed in class and she won’t live up to expectations.”

“Is that the fear students have of every class, not just the advanced ones?”

“That’s what I told her yesterday. I said since all the classes are nothing but a series of tests, you have nothing to fear if you’re invited into the advanced class because it’s already assumed you will be able to do the work.”

Erywin picked up on a slight shake of Annie’s head and knew it meant something. “You have an opinion on this?”

 

Well, of course Annie has an opinion on this matter. If there’s one thing that both kids have picked up over there B Levels, it’s that they have to be honest when evaluating the progress of someone they are mentoring/teaching/tutoring.  Annie has always been honest about Kerry’s progress, which means she’s going to be honest about Alex’s progress.

The good thing is Erywen knows this, and she can expect Annie to give her an honest evaluation.  And what is that evaluation?

Maybe you’ll find out tomorrow.