Seeing Your Way Down the Time Lines

Today it’s a different kind of video because I’m taking you to a place you’ve heard of, but rarely seen:

My time lines.

So get ready for a nearly hour-long trip through the world I created.  Enjoy.

 

The New Plot

So, the plotting has begun.  Not a lot so far, unless you consider six chapters not a lot.

Yeah, let me start beating myself up here.

Yeah, let me start beating myself up here.

Then again, I feel like I should have more but I got involved in taking a nap and finishing up my binging of Breaking Bad, and, oh, yeah, I needed about an hour to chill my shit after my latest Sense8 recap received a comment from one of the creators/writers/producers of that show.  You know, pretty much a normal Saturday night–

So let’s see what I have laid out so far for C For Continuation, shall we?

Chapter One is pretty much straight forward, and it contains something I’ve yet to do:  there’s a flashback.  Looking at the dates and times of the first two scenes it’s pretty easy to tell where the flashback occurs, and you may be able to figure out how it’s coming into play.  Also, looking at the times, this is almost all an Annie chapter, because it seems like most of this is happening somewhere in the mountains of Bulgaria.

C For Continuing Chapter One

Chapter Two consists of summer get together, and one big surprise that you’ll have to see.  To save you the looking up, Rendlesham Forest is Kerry’s meeting with Penny, and The Great Gates of Kiev is Annie’s meeting with Alex.  I can tell you right now, these will be fun scenes to write when I get to them.

C For Continuing Chapter Two

Chapter Three is the winding down of the Summer of 2013, and there are going to be a couple of surprises here.  The dates of the last two scenes should be to let you know they happen about a week and a half before the kids leave for staging in Paris before heading off to school.

C For Continuing Chapter Three

That’s Part One out of the way; onward to Part Two.  Chapter Four will likely be a short chapters, perhaps the shortest of the novel.  It’s probably the tightest packed for time as well, because about a half hour passed from the beginning of the first scene to the end of the third.  Short, sweet, and about as to the point as I can get in this story.

By the way, Pour Rencontrer à Paris means “To Meet in Paris,” which is what my kids are doing.

C For Continuing Chapter Four

Chapter Five has the kids doing a little roaming around in The City of Light.  The first scene is going to see a new Party of Five in Paris, and they’ll have lunch in a cafe where I had lunch in 2006–no, really.  The third scene does not have anything to do with a Woody Allen movie of the same name, so don’t expect any time traveling.  But scene two:  oh, you can expect some tears there, all for reasons that will become apparent when I finally write that scene.

C For Continuing Chapter Five

Chapter Six has the kids leaving Paris and returning to Salem.  À Plus Tard Paris means, “See you later, Paris,” because–spoilers!–this won’t be the last time Annie and Kerry visit Paris together.  Not when this is Annie’s favorite city in the whole world, at least according to her.  The second scene will answer a question brought up in A For Advanced, and I’ll likely show a little of the background stuff that goes on when Foundation people are scamming their way through Normal society.  And the last scene of this chapter is pretty self-explanatory:  the kids finally make it back to the school–they are, so to speak, home.

As I have indicated I’m playing off events already laid out in Aeon Timeline, and this newest version is coming in handy due to the programs flexibility.  I particularly like that I can now expand events without having to enter the Inspector, which is now used for editing the events.

See what I can see?  And I'm not even a Seer.

See what I can see? And I’m not even a Seer.

And one interesting thing here is that Penny is almost exactly a year older than Annie, with her birthday coming not much after Annie’s.  Well, maybe not that interesting, but it’s something I pick up on right away when looking at these new timeline events.  We also know the school has been around away, but I didn’t bother with a creation date for Paris, because if you don’t already know it’s older than hell, you need to get into your history.

What’s up for today?  Well, I meet someone for lunch, then I begin adding more chapters and scenes.  I likely won’t finish plotting this out by tomorrow, but come this Saturday I’ll have the majority of it in place.  And since I already know how this novel ends I can begin writing before putting in the last scene.

Like with most of my trips, I know my destination.  And I will arrive there safely.

The First Day Finds

Finally, after the rest and TV watching and getting images for tonight’s recap, I got into the novel and finished that first scene for Chapter Five.

Sure, it took three days, but it was worth it.

Sure, it took three days, but it was worth it.

I finished off about two thousand words last night, and I have been reading every words of this story, which is one of the reasons it’s taking so long.  According to my Scrivener numbers I’ve read and edited 61,300 and some words, and that’s a pretty good run for the last month.  Like I said, by the middle to the end of next month, I should have this revision complete.

The last part of this scene dealt with the headmistress getting up in front of the new students and telling them the truth:  there are Normals, there are Aware, most of the Aware are witches–oh, and guess which group you’re in?  It’s not the first time we’ve heard Normal used, but it is the first time Aware is used, and it’s the first time The W Word gets uttered.  All the pieces are in place:  now to torture the kids.

Not really.  Not at least yet.

That doesn’t mean I didn’t change things around last night.  One of the biggest sections was right here:

 

(The following excerpts from The Foundation Chronicles, Book One: A For Advanced, copyright 2016 by Cassidy Frazee)

Once the returning students were out of the room and the doors were closed, the headmistress nodded at the instructors seated, and they moved about so they all faced the students. Only then did she begin speaking. “By now I’m sure that all of you suspect The Foundation recruiter who spoke with you and your parents wasn’t completely honest about the true mission of this institution.” She stepped away from the podium while remaining upon the riser. Even without a visible microphone her voice carried through the room. “It is now time to allay those suspicions and put them to rest.

“Several things were said in your meetings: that you would attend a private school, that you would receive a free education, that you would find yourself exposed to languages, math, arts, and science. That we were a one-of-a-kind institute, and what you were going to learn here could not be taught anywhere else in the world.

“All of that is true—there is nothing in those statements that is untrue. You will learn all that—” She stopped, pausing for effect. “And far more.

“Some history, first. This school was founded in 1683, and the first classes began on 1 September of that year, which means your coming here occurs upon the three hundred and twenty-eighth anniversary of that event. The Great Hall was begun in 1685; the Pentagram walls and garden were begun in 1688, and the Coven Towers followed soon after in 1692. All was completed by 1717—which means when you graduate, this dining hall will have existed in this form for three hundred years. Ours is a grand and wonderful history, started long before The Foundation actually appeared.

 

That was the past, and here is the preset:

 

Once the returning students were out of the room and the doors were closed, the headmistress nodded at the instructors seated. They moved their chairs so they also faced the students, and only once they were in place did she speak. “By now I’m certain that nearly all of you suspect The Foundation recruiter who spoke with you and your parents wasn’t completely honest about the true mission of this institution.” She stepped away from the podium while remaining upon the riser. Even without a visible microphone her voice carried through the room. “It is now time to allay those suspicions and put them to rest.

“Several things were said in your meetings: that you would attend a private school, that you would receive a free education, that you would find yourself exposed to languages, math, arts, and science. That we were a one-of-a-kind institute, and what you were going to learn here could not be taught anywhere else in the world.

“All of those statement are true: you will learn all that—” She stopped, pausing for effect. “And far more.

“Some history, first. This school was founded in 1683, and the first classes began on 1 September of that year, which means your coming here occurs on the three hundred and twenty-eighth anniversary of that event. Construction on the Great Hall began in 1685; the Pentagram Walls and Garden were started in 1688, and the coven towers followed soon after in 1692. All was completed before 1700, which means when you graduate, this dining hall will have existed in this form for three hundred and seventeen years. Ours is a grand and wonderful history begun long before The Foundation actually appeared.

 

Believe it or not, some of the dates in the last paragraph were wrong.  I thought I had everything correct, but no.  I didn’t.  And that meant I needed to head back into the time line and get things fixed.

Sometimes times doesn't be time.

Sometimes times doesn’t be time.

It’s rare that I get things off like that, but I think that’s due to actually writing the above section before I had all the details in the Aeon Timeline finalized, and I didn’t go back and check this part of the novel when I put in some of the information in the above line.  Now you know how I am always checking things, and how I have checks for my checks, and I now have keywords in place on the novel so I can find these timeline spots again.

And it all ends with the kids feeling–well, that’s hard to say:

 

All the instructors stood as did the students. Annie stood first and waited a few seconds for Kerry to get to his feet. After he was up he spoke for the first time since this private talk began. “Well, that was interesting.”

“Yes, it was.” She didn’t like the way he watched all the adults as they filed out of the room, and dread began to fill her once more. He is having second thoughts about being here? The headmistress’ statement that she’d “see what I can do to help” may have confused some students, but Annie didn’t need an interpreter: if any student had too difficult a time adjusting to the environment, they’d be sent elsewhere—perhaps even back to a Normal school.

And she was certain Kerry understood that as well.

Is he having doubts? Did he find the headmistress’ comments too unbelievable? Once more Annie felt nervous, and she wondered if they’d both make it through the day unscathed.

 

Annie, you worry too much!  Yeah, early on she was a bit of a worry wart when it came to the relationship, but she’s much better now.

And now they’re off to see their first instructor:

Emphases on “see”—

The Expansion of the Days

For someone who isn’t writing, guess what I did last night?

No, I wasn’t starting the next novel.  I was working on my “movie trailer” last night, and by the time I got to where I was ready for bed and through with writing I’d written just over eleven hundred words.  And wasn’t finished:  that should happen tonight, which means I should have said trailer up and ready to go tomorrow.  So, there:  you have something to look forward to seeing.

And that means once I finish that, I’m going to write the trailer for the C Level novel, and that will mean spoilers, ’cause there’s no way I can do that without giving away a few things.  Of course I can always wait for like, oh, maybe another six hundred days before doing that one . . .

Lot’s of things like that happening.  I have the images floating around in my head, it’s just a matter of putting it all down so it makes sense.  One of the reasons I took about three hours writing last night is due to having to come up with the scene in my head, then find that scene in the novel, and there’s a lot of novel to go through.  Not to mention the fact I’m trying something here that I’ve not tried before, and that doesn’t make the writing any easier.

What this all means is that I’m digging through these two periods in time, one of which hasn’t been written as of yet, to bring some goodness to people’s lives:

It doesn't look like much, but there's like a "writing a novel" moment of time right there.

It doesn’t look like much, but there’s like a “writing a novel” moment of time right there.

That’s the period covered by my last and next novel, and it’s the only two books in the series where it flows right from one to the next.  And because of my timelines I can write out what’s going to happen for the next book even without having written anything yet, so that’s a great help.

In looking at the time lines today I realized that I need to lay out a couple of arcs to keep track of things.  In Aeon Timeline Arcs are used to contain and track events, and I realize there are some events that are easier to track if I’m not putting them under either Annie’s or Kerry’s arcs.  Like holidays they may take, or work for the Guardians.  And after the long talk I had yesterday about a certain movie taking place in a certain Asian city, I have a feeling a certain witchy couple might get sent there at some point in their future, and I’ll need to work out those details and track them.

But that’s all in my future, too.  I need to put that behind me (The future back to the past?  Could be a story!) and concentrate on the present.  Though you’re always thinking of the future:  it’s impossible not to do that.  Particularly when you’re writing, because you’re always thinking about the story to come.

Sort of like what I always seem to be doing.

The Midnight Window: Plans of Future Past

It’s been a good morning, though I could have done with a bit more sleep.  Hey, you can’t always get what you want, right?  Since it’s a long weekend I can nap whenever I feel it’s necessary.  Until then, I just keep plugging words into the right places.

Rocking out to Domino as I go about my day.

Rocking out to Domino as I go about said plugging.

Chapter Thirty-four is finished due to plugging in one thousand and twenty-five words to the chapter.

Right here's the proof--more or less.

Right here’s the proof–more or less.

Now all that remains is Chapter Thirty-five and four scenes, maybe six thousand words total, two of which will be “The End.”  One more scene in the Sea Sprite Inn–which may or may not be needed, I’ve yet to decide–one on the plane, one at the airport in Berlin, and the final one at Kerry’s house.  I’m actually considering moving the first scene of Chapter Thirty-five to the plane simply because there’s something I want to do, and having everyone at the plane makes that thing happen easier, so that may be what happens.  As soon as I start writing, I’ll know.

If that is the case this could be the last scene at the Sea Sprite.  And remember that thing that Annie wanted to discuss?  Well . . .

 

The following excerpts from The Foundation Chronicles, Book Two: B For Bewitching, copyright 2015, 2016 by Cassidy Frazee)

Kerry crossed the room and sat on the bed as Annie asked. He watched her as she went over to her bag on the luggage stand, opened the bag, and unzipped one of the compartments. Her body shielded what she was removing, but upon turning it was easy enough to see, for she was holding a large book bound in a plain white cover. She floated the book in his direction and waited until it was nearly in front of him before she moved towards the bed.

He kept his eyes focused on the book as it came to a stop before him. “Is this what I think it is?”

 

Yes, Kerry:  it’s exactly what you think is it.  And is there a reason this book is coming out?  Sure there is, and Annie’s going to tell you–

 

Annie didn’t answer the question: rather, she began speaking as she climbed on to the bed. “The Sunday after your birthday I wrote to my mother and asked if she’d ever shown her wedding book to Papa, and if it was common for wives to do so after they were married. A few days later she wrote back and told me that, yes, she had shown her book to Papa—

“My mother and father were married 20 June, 1997. My mother wanted to be married near the first day of summer because it’s considered an auspicious moment when one marries at anytime on or close to a solstice point. They graduated in 1994, did their Real Live Experience the following year, and were invited in for a year of the school’s Continuing Educational Program before leaving in ‘96. Since that counted as two years of college, they then went off to Uni in the fall and finished another year while Mama planed for their marriage. They finished Uni the next year and graduated right before they celebrated their first anniversary.

“After that they settled to Pamporovo full-time and built the main house; it was finished in October, and they were all moved in before winter hit.” A sheepish look came over Annie’s face. “That’s where I was conceived.”

Kerry touched Annie’s hand. “Right around Christmas, if my math is right.”

She nodded. “Mama told me that it likely, um, happened right at Christmas. She told me she was trying to start a family, and conceiving a child at that time—”

“Is considered auspicious?”

“Obviously: look how I turned out.” After they both giggled Annie continued. “So on their next anniversary Mama was pregnant with me, and that would be their last one with just them together. Papa treated her to a spa treatment at one of the hotels in town, then they jaunted into Sofia, saw a movie, and had a romantic dinner. She wrote that it was one of her best days ever.

“After they returned home they visited what was going to become my nursery before heading off to bed. She wrote that they didn’t go to bed right away: she pulled out her book and showed it to Papa, showing him everything she’d planed from the time she was a little girl until even a few days before the wedding. That was—” Annie blushed slightly. “That was when she picked out names for her children.”

“She knew what she wanted.” Kerry squeezed Annie’s hand once more. “Like mother, like daughter.”

“Um, hum.”

“Was your name in the book?”

“She told me I was at the top of the girl’s list.” She chuckled softly. “She said she told Papa that as they were starting a family, and she didn’t believe they would ever not be a couple, she saw no harm in sharing those memories with him. She also wrote that while it isn’t that common for wives to do this, once you know you’re in a relationship that will last forever, there’s no harm.”

 

Now you know so much more about Annie’s family:  their schooling, their marriage, and the, um, “special Christmas” they had in 1998.  Just think of all the times now Annie will be down in the family room, look over at the door leading to her parent’s bedroom, and thing, “Yep.  That’s where I was made.”  Not that she probably didn’t know.  Then again, her mother has probably known for at least three years that Annie had the lake house built for one reason in mind, and she sort of shakes her head whenever she looks up towards the loft.  And now that she’s met Kerry . . . probably a bit of face palming now and then.

It’s a given that I know when Annie’s parents were married, because–

I have a time line for everything.

I have a time line for everything.

And if you notice there’s an end date on their marriage:  15 November, 2126.  That means, according to the calculation determined by Aeon Timeline 2, they remain married 129 years, 4 months, 3 weeks, and 5 days.  When we talk about the longevity of witches, there’s a prime example right there.  And you can guess their marriage ends because one of both of them die, which means both of them are over a hundred and forty when one of them passes beyond The Veil.

Now, as far as their school time together–

I have it right here.

I have it right here.

Things get a bit interesting.  Jessica, Trevor, Mathilde, and Matthias were all older students when Pavlina and Victor started school, and Maddie and her now-deceased husband were only a year old.  Ramona and Coraline were only a year younger, and Adric and Holoč a couple of year behind them.  We can also see that Harpreet entered Cernunnos Coven the year after Holoč, and you have to wonder if C Level Holoč showed the same welcome to B Level Harpreet when she first arrived on the second floor.  And Isis came on to the first floor of Cernunnos Coven at the same time Pavlina and Victor were doing their only years of the school’s Continuing Education Program, so it’s possible the may have encountered the future Chief of Security for the school while they were essentially graduate students.

In case you’re wondering about the above line colors, they correspond to covens.  Red is Cernunnos; yellow is Ceridwen; sea green is Blodeuwedd; orange is Åsgårdsreia; and blue is Mórrígan.  Yes, Erywin and Helena are covenmates with Maddie, which is likely another reason why Helena was ready to kill her when she found out she was a Guardian mole.

Now, why is Annie showing Kerry her book?  There is an excellent reason for this:

 

She gentle lay her left hand upon the cover of the unopened levitating book. “As I see it, my love, we’ve been married for thirteen years, and I believe we’ll be together for the rest of our lives.” She slipped her right hand out of Kerry’s and set it over his chest where the personal medical monitor set. “Like you pointed out, we’re joined in more ways than one, and I have no fear you’ll ever take up with someone else.”

He placed his hand over her chest as well. “I wouldn’t leave, ever.”

Annie nodded once as she and Kerry set their hands back to their laps. “In five years we’ll be eighteen—well, you will: I’ll be eighteen in a little over four, but . . .” She retook his left hand in hers. “By then we’ll have graduated from school and have finished our Real Life Experience, and if we’re asked back for CEP studies, I want us to return as a married couple.

“I want to show you everything I’ve dreamed about and planed for the last seven year. I want you to see my sketches, my dress designs, the first drawings I made of the lake house—”

“And the names of our children?” A broad grin spread across Kerry’s face.

“I don’t have those—yet.” Annie’s face broke out with a smile as well. “Also, I want a June wedding: like my mother, I want to be married as close to the solstice as possible; I want the moment to be auspicious for us as well.

“But there’s another reason I’m doing this: there are some things in which I want you to have a hand as well. I told you about the rings I’ve designed, and I want you to see them so—” She rested her head against his shoulder momentarily “—you can have your input. While the things in her are my plans and dreams, there are a few items for which you should have some say” She turned a coy look in his direction. “It’s only fair.”

Kerry felt his eyes misting over again and he put a stop to it right away: he didn’t want tears to fall into Annie’s most prized book. “I’m honored you trust me with this.”

“If I can’t trust my husband, who can I trust? Come, my love—” Her eyes twinkled in the darkness as she flipped the book open. “We have a wedding to plan.”

 

“We have a wedding to plan.”  And right there, Annie is letting her soul mate know there’s no more screwing around:  in five year’s time there’s gonna be wedding bells, and they’re gonna ring in June.  She’s always got her eyes on the prize, and the prize involves getting hitched to the Ginger Hair Boy.  Though you have to wonder if she starts putting names in the baby section if she’ll tell Kerry, or if she’ll ask for suggestions.  Or if she’ll say something like, “My love, we need to pick to baby names,” and wait for him to ask why.

Yeah, I think that’s the end of the Sea Sprite until next year, because anything else in that building is anticlimactic after that last statement.

Don’t worry:  they’ll be back next year . . .

Timeing On a Sunday Afternoon

It’s one-thirty PM, or thirteen-thirty if you happen to attend a certain fictional school I know, and the mimosas didn’t kill me.  Rendered me a little spacey–okay, a lot spacy–but that’s it.  I’m still functional, after a fashion.

Water + Music = Recovery!

Water + Music = Recovery!

When I picked up my new computer a couple of weeks ago the primary goal was to get it set up as quickly as possible so I could get back into my writing, and do it with the tools I’d already learned to use on the old Beast.  Getting Scrivener and Scapple and Blender weren’t that big of a deal:  I had the licence from when I’d picked them up originally, so all I needed to do was download current versions and reapply the licences.  For Sweet Home 3D I pick up a new version, which was needed as well as this one came with lots of content.

But Aeon Timeline was a completely different story.  In the time since buying it originally a new version had come out that changed how it now function, and the dilemma was do I get the old version and work with that, or do I go with the new hotness even though it’s going to run me $50?

The answer was yes and I proceeded to get the new program and pay for the licence.  The question after that became, was it worth it?

The answer is yes.

The basic interface to Aeon Timeline 2 is much the same, yet at the same time it feels so much fuller and, in a way, less crowed and busy.  This is due to taking a few things that were all clumped together and breaking them out either into their own windows, or setting tabs to allow the user to drill down to what they want to work upon.

So new, yet so familiar.

So new, yet so familiar.

When you bring up the program the first time the interface is now a black background with white lettering.  If you don’t like this, you can go to the old standby of a white background with black lettering:

Which is pretty easy on the eyes.

Which is pretty easy on the eyes.

And if you want to get fancy, there are a few backgrounds that allow a little color and text to liven up your time lining drudgery.  Like this one, the Borealis:

Which, for obvious reasons, reminds me of The Polar Express.

Which, for obvious reasons, reminds me of The Polar Express.

As before, adding an event is as simple as clicking somewhere within an existing time and plugging in information.  This function is a window that drops down from the middle-top, and there are a few things here that immediately pop into view, such as Parent, Participants, Observers, and Place.  The last three take the place of another function found in Timeline 1, and Parent–well, we’ll get to that.

Until then I'm teasing you hard.

Until then I’m teasing you hard.

The Inspector–that area that you can pop open on the right hand size of the interface to add information to each event–has been updated considerably.  Where as in Timeline 1 everything was crammed into that widow for one to search out and modify, everything is now set up in separate tabs, allowing the user to concentrated on one particular thing at a time while they’re building up an event.  This making things less confusing when modifying something, as the signal to noise ratio is toned down a great deal.

There’s a lot of meta data that can now be entered for an event, and in the past if you wanted to see that meta data you needed to open the Inspector.  Not any more.  You can go into your Display Options and decide what you want to see when you “expand” an event, and then all one has to do is hover over said event until a little green arrow pops into view in the upper right hand corner–

That one right there.

That one right there.

And click it so the event expands.

Giving you all this.

Giving you all this.

Here I went crazy with the expanded data.  So now I see what is happening, who is involved, who is watching, where it’s happening, the arc in which this information is found, and, if I like, a nice picture of the area that I can expand into a larger picture window.  If you notice, the time line event also tells me the ages to the people involved, and even the age of the location.  The people and location can be tied to an event for time purposes, allowing you to see how old a person and/or location is in relationship to where the event falls.

So if I want to see how long my kids had been at school at the time the Called Up event occurred, I bring up Manage Entities, find the character in question, and reset their age at the moment they arrived at school:

Seems like you only arrived yesterday, doesn't it, young lady?

Seems like you only arrived yesterday, doesn’t it, young lady?

So when I reexamine the Called Up event, we now discover how long Annie and Kerry were students when they were informed by Helena that The Guardians needed them.

Answer: just a week short of seven months.

Answer: just a week short of seven months.

Man, walk in the door of this joint and before you know it people want you to go off and “observe” bad guys.

Two of the biggest changes are Parents and Dependencies.  Creating Parent Events allow one to set up an entities that occurs over time, yet consists of multiple actions or events within that time period.  One of the easiest to show is from A For Advanced, the first week of school from the first class to the last moment of the second Midnight Madness.

Pretty straight forward as it sits now.

Pretty straight forward as it sits now.

Now lets created a new event called First Week of School and set the time frame for the parent.

B For Bewitching Aeon Timeline 2 First Week of School

And start moving the already established events into the Parent Event:

Until it looks like this.

Until it looks like this.

If you look closely you’ll see a little “+” on that event line, so if you click on that–

There's all my old events.

There’s all my old events.

This helps you manage your events better without having to resort using another time line and linking to that–unless, of course, you have several arcs worth of information you need covered, in which case you may want that other time line.

Dependencies are the other addition to the program, and it’ll come in handy where one has events that not only require a certain amount of time between passages, but are grouped together.  One sets the main event, then when adding additional events after that, the user needs to only specified to what event the new event is tied, and then indicate the time span between those events.  Not only does the program then determine the actual times, but if the first event is change to a new time and/or date, the dependent events follow and are adjusted automatically.

Comes in handy when you want to create the time line for a fast-occurring action scene.

Comes in handy when you want to create the time line for a fast-occurring action scene.

And as I discovered while playing with another time line, if you need to know when an event happening in one time zone is being monitored in another, then event can be made dependent, and times can be adjusted forward and backwards.  So say Helena’s in San Francisco for some reason, and she wants to speak with Kerry in Cardiff and Annie in Pamporovo, you’d set up Helena’s event with San Fran time, then make Kerry’s event 8 hours ahead of Helena’s, and Annie’s 10 hours ahead, and right there you have the events and times without having to do a lot of looking.  And if the user needs to move Helena’s time for any reason, Annie’s and Kerry’s events change time as well.

There you have it:  my new toy.  And while it might not be useful for his latest novel, I’m certain I’ll get some use out of it in the following novels.

It’s just a matter of time.

When Times Slips Away–

Here it is, almost ten in the morning, and all the things I’ve wanted to do I haven’t.  Which means my blog post for the day is coming after I return from brunch, which I’m supposed to show up for in an hour.

The thing is, the reason I haven’t written anything this morning is because I’ve been playing with a new toy.  And, man, have I been having fun.  I can’t talk about it right now, but it will likely be the subject of the next blog post.  The one coming this afternoon, that is.  Assuming I haven’t drank too many mimosas.

I’ll just give you a little peek at what’s coming:

It looks so familiar, yet so different.

It looks so familiar, yet so different.

See you on the other side.