Cartref yn ôl ar Gyfer y Gwyliau

And with a title like the mouthful posted today, it means only one thing:  someone’s back home in Wales.  It goes without saying that this is probably not a good moment for my Ginger Hair Boy, because home is not a good place for him, but at least he didn’t have a break down moment like the last time he left a certain Chestnut Girl who was on her way back to Bulgaria.

He know he’s going to see her in a few weeks, and this slight pain he feels is a good one.  Or so he was once told.

Therefore let us to head off to the place of the return and see what transpires next.

No word if Kerry picked up a tasty steak pastry before leaving the station, however.

No word if Kerry picked up a tasty traditional steak pastry before leaving the station, however.


(All excerpts from The Foundation Chronicles, Book Two: B For Bewitching, copyright 2015 by Cassidy Frazee)

Kerry followed Ms. Rutherford out of Cardiff Central Station and headed towards the Audi saloon with the raised boot lid. He set his roll-on bag in the boot, tapped the lid to activate the auto-close mechanism, then got in on the rear passenger side, setting his backpack between his legs. The moment his seat belt clicked shut, the driver put the car in gear and pulled out.

Weather was about normal for this time of year for Cardiff: cloudy with a light winds and about eight Centigrade. The sun had set about an hour before, but the lights of the city kept everything bright. It was rare he saw this part of the city when it was dark: the few times he’d went with his family anywhere during the evening, they bypassed downtown by taking Western Avenue. Not that they ever went anywhere at night . . .

His mind wasn’t on being home: it was on Annie and on meeting her father. After the discussion he had with Ms Rutherford before their late lunch, he couldn’t get over the feeling of her dad scrutinizing him, of trying to determine if there was something different about him. He didn’t get that exact feeling while standing across from him in the jaunt waiting area, but a few hours later, after he’d had time to analyze the meeting, the meeting left him a little unnerved.

Annie told me there were things I needed to know about her family— He caught a quick glimpse of the prison as they drove eastward. She didn’t mention anything about her father doing his best to make me feel a bit insignificant.


After a few hours of sitting and lunching and enjoying some great sandwiches and talking with Ms. Rutherford, Kerry finally starting to get those “I just met my girlfriend’s father” jitters, and it’s not leaving him in a good place.  The last twenty-four hours have been pretty heavy for Kerry, with parents meetings and talk of babies.  What else can get laid on his twelve year old ass before he’s dropped off for Christmas?


Bernice sensed his contemplation. “Thinking about anyone I know?”

“Annie—” He looked straight ahead. “And her dad.”

“Ah, yes: the future father-in-law.” She almost chuckled at the sideways look Kerry sent her way. “There’s one thing I didn’t tell you about fathers—”

“What’s that?”

“The never think there’s any boy who’s good enough for their daughters. They spend their entire lives providing and protecting their little girls, and then along comes some boy who captures her heart, and . . .” She shrugged. “I want to say it shouldn’t be that way, but often times it goes in that direction. You do have one thing going for you—”

He looked across to his case working. “And that is?”

“Annie. From what I know, from what you’ve told me, she’s made her choice, and she isn’t about to change her feelings for you. Given the powers of persuasion she has with her parents, I believe when the time comes, she’d get her father to come around to her way of thinking.” She glanced out the window to her right. “More or less.”

“That’s comforting.” Kerry chuckled imagining that confrontation. “Guess there’s nothing I can do about it right now.”

“There’s nothing you can do about it, period.” She turned back towards Kerry. “Just be yourself, Kerry. If you try to actively impress her father, you’ll likely end up looking ridiculous. Don’t try to be someone else: be the one with whom Annie fell in love. That’s all you have to do.” She reached over and patted the back of his right hand. “That’s all that’s necessary.”


It seems like this holiday jaunt is a lot about the kid’s future, and while it seems like it’s Gang Up on Kerry time, you’ll see in a bit that Annie’s gonna get here share of questions, too.  This is a package deal, and you can bet someone in Annie’s family has a few questions, too.  And does it need to be mentioned that a time will come when Annie gets to meet her future in-laws, and who the hell knows how they’re gonna take this headstrong girl with a strange accent?  Especially Kerry’s mom:  she seems like a bit of a control freak, so what’s it going to be like when she runs into another one taking over her son’s life?  The Controlling Mom meets The Dark Witch.  Should be a good one.

But that’s for another time, and tonight I’ll get my shot and after that make another video to mark an occasion that happens this Sunday.  So much to do, so little time in which to eat, drink, and try to be merry.

At least I enjoyed my Cosmos with dinner last night.

At least I enjoyed my Cosmos with dinner last night.

Willkommen in Wien: Vater Themen

And just like that, Chapter Seventeen is half over.  Four nights of averaging about seven hundred and eighty words each night brought the scene to an end, and now I can move on to the kids finally arriving home.

This has been an interesting scene, because it’s nothing like I originally envisioned it in the beginning, which was just Kerry coming back with Annie and then both of them realizing they’d been seen arriving holding hands, which of course gets all sorts of things going in Daddy’s mind.  Here I went more into an explanation of what’s going on, and, like below, some of the implications of what this all means.  Like . . .


(All excerpts from The Foundation Chronicles, Book Two: B For Bewitching, copyright 2015 by Cassidy Frazee)

“It’s obvious you don’t have a sibling.” Bernice settled back in her chair and crossed her legs. “If you had a sister, you might have noticed how your father acts differently around her.”

He stopped tapping the chair’s arms and sunk down in the seat. “It’s just the way he was looking at me—like there was something wrong with me.”

She chuckled. “Don’t take it personally. That attitude goes all the way back to the days when it was considered part of the father’s duty to guard their daughter’s virginity.”

Kerry was aware of this being a standard in some cultures even today, and her found it as ridiculous as Ms. Rutherford seemed to make it appear. “That’s dumb.”

“It is, but . . .” She glanced towards the lounge entrance. “You have to realize something, Kerry. I’m somewhat aware of the deepness of your relationship with Annie—I know that Annie almost didn’t attend Salem because you wanted to stay in Europe and look for you when she got older—and I’m certain her mother know how deep it runs as well. It’s even possible Annie has said things to her mother about your relationship that it only know to her and you.

“When it comes to the father, he may not know the depth of your feelings for each other, but he’s aware it exists. He knows Annie has feelings for you, and you for her. When he saw you today, he didn’t see a young boy holding hands with this daughter—” She tapped her finger in the air in Kerry’s direction. “He sees a potential suitor for his little girl.”


All of a sudden Kerry is getting hit over the head with being a husband and, as we’ll see, something else.  It’s something that no twelve year old kids under normal circumstances ever deal with, but we all know Kerry is far from normal . . .


The moment Ms. Rutherford finished her statement Kerry began wondering just how much she actually knew about Annie and his relationship. There were only a few people who knew of the vision they shared, and while he was certain that Annie’s mother didn’t know about their vision, he was aware she’d seen his name in Annie’s wedding book. She knows Annie is serious about me, about what she wants to do. Her dad has to feel we’re not just a couple of kids holding hands. “He automatically knows I’m gonna marry Annie in the future?”

Bernice kept her face impassive, but she caught the way Kerry phrased his statement: Not “If I” but “I’m gonna marry”. He’s completely sure of where their relationship is going— “I’m sure he’s discussed you with Annie’s mother, and I’d venture that he was sizing you up as more to Annie than a boyfriend. He knows his daughter—”

“And what Annie wants, Annie gets.” Kerry chuckled. “First time I’ve said that.”

“Really?” Bernice chuckled with him. “The thing to keep in mind here, Kerry, is that all fathers are usually a bit unsettled by their daughter’s boyfriends. They know they have the potential to become their husbands, and because they were once some girl’s boyfriend who then became their husband. And it doesn’t take them long to understand why their father-in-law was so unsettled by them, because they also waited for their daughters to tell them the one phrase they didn’t want to hear—”

“What’s that?” He couldn’t imagine Annie’s father being that upset by anything Annie would tell him . . . “’I’m getting married’?”

“No: ‘I’m pregnant’.”


Yeah, just keep hammering home those little witches waiting in the wings!  The one’s who’ll have either red or chestnut hair and will get practice brooms when they’re five or six and ride around behind Mama and Papa in the yard, or maybe even down at Grandma’s and Grandpa’s big yard in Bulgaria, and then grow up and go to Salem and see pictures of their parents kissing two miles up in the air and hear the stories about how all they did was snog and eeeewwwwwww . . .

Really, these kids will, at some point, have to live down the fact that their parents were a couple of Tweenage Horndogs when they got to school, and other’s might wonder if they’ll follow in their footsteps.  When they’re not following in Mama’s Murder Time skills . . .


Those two words froze Kerry’s train of though. The thoughts of marriage didn’t bother him: after reconciling Annie’s vision with his, and continuing the discussion to where they would start their home after the wedding, this was the second time in twelve hours he was reminded that their was another responsibility that came with getting married and making a home for each other. Annie said she already carried our children, and now Ms. Rutherford is saying her dad is living with the knowledge that those kids are coming–

He shook his head. “I’m not ready to think about this stuff now.”

“I don’t blame you.” Bernice checked her watch. “It’s been about fifteen minutes; I figure Annie and her parents are back in Bulgaria about now.”

“I think so, too.” He stood and checked that his backpack was firmly secured around his handle of his roll-on bag. “I’m ready.”

“Good.” Bernice grabbed her bag and secured it tightly on her shoulder. “Feel like a light late lunch? I know a place here in Vienna that serves the most wonderful sandwiches.”

Knowing that he’d likely have nothing but take away or leftovers when he arrived home, Kerry liked her suggestion. “Dining in Vienna . . . sounds good to me.”


Ms. Rutherford knows her charge, and knows he’ll probably get crap for dinner when he gets home.  It must be nice to get a late lunch in Vienna after coming home from school with your girlfriend.  At least someone’s looking out for this kid.

Here we now are:

Half way done; half way there.

Half way done; half way there.

And if the titles of the remaining scenes are any indication–along with the times–I think we can say the kids get home in one piece . . .

Willkommen in Wien: Das Treffen

Here we are once more, with my quick and dirty just under seven hundred word, excerpt.  Not a lot is happening, but on the other hand, everything is happening, and it’s going to happen quickly.  Because, it seems, someone is getting set up here–


(All excerpts from The Foundation Chronicles, Book Two: B For Bewitching, copyright 2015 by Cassidy Frazee)

Bernice turned her back for a few seconds and smiled. She couldn’t prove anything, but the current situation so felt like Annie had tried to do something that didn’t sit well with her mother, and Pavlina decided that since her daughter was bringing her boyfriend with her to Vienna, she may as well bring Annie’s father along to meet the lad. If what I’ve read about Annie is true, I know where she gets her drive and stubbornness.

An announcement sounded through the room. “Vian atenton, mi petas. Teleportation de la Salem Instituto de Granda Lernado kaj Edukado ekkomprenas. Studentoj alvenante en dek kvin sekundoj.” People in the room turned towards the glassed in area anticipation of the arrival of children returning for the holidays.


In case your Esperanto is rusty, what was announced was this:  “Your attention, please. Teleportation from the Salem Institute of Greater Learning and Education is commencing. Students arriving in fifteen seconds.”  I really like there are a number of Esperanto translators around, and while this isn’t perfect, it’s good enough for my needs.  And my needs are simple.

But if there are students coming in from Salem, you know what that means . . .


A massive set of pops echoed through the platform room as just over a dozen kids jaunted in from America. Bernice looked for one child in particular, and she spotted him immediately. Kerry was up front near the edge, his bag on his right and Annie on his left. They stepped off the platform and proceeded through the opening glass doors into the waiting area. Bernice watched how they remained side-by-side from one room to the next—and that they held hands the whole time—

She wasn’t the only one to notice.

Annie broke from Kerry the moment she saw her parents. He wandered over to Bernice. “Hi, Ms. Rutherford.”

“Hello, Kerry.” This close to him it wasn’t difficult to see how different he seemed from this time last year. Then he was a tired, mopey boy who missed a young girl from Bulgaria terribly. Now he seemed better adjusted, less sad, a great deal more upbeat. “How are you?”

“I’m fine.” He smiled and patted the handle of his bag. “It was a good night and we had a good morning—”



The last time Kerry heard his name called out like that he had to meet someone.  And, well:  it’s no different this time–


He and Bernice turned in the direction of Annie’s voice. Bernice suspected what was coming next, but as for the boy to her left—

He faced Annie, but his eyes were on the two adults with her—particular the man on her left. “Yes?”

“I’d like to introduce my parents.” She motioned to her right. “You remember my mother?”

“Yes, I do.” He held out his hand. “Hello again, Mrs. Kirilova.”

“How are you, Kerry?” She shook his hand. “It’s a pleasure to see you again.”

“Good to see you, too.”

Annie motioned the man next to her forward. “And this . . . is my father.”

Once more he held out his hand. “How do you do? Victor Kirilov.”

Kerry took his hand. “Kerry Malibey.” They shook. “How do you do, sir?”

“I’m well, thank you.” Victor stared at Kerry; the boy stared back. Neither spoke while Victor seemed to regard the lad carefully. “So . . . The Ginger Hair Boy.” The right side of his mouth curled upward. “We meet at last.”

Kerry voice caught in his throat, the only sign he may have felt a bit unnerved. “Yes, sir, it appears we are.”


So, here we are:  both kids in Vienna, Kerry’s case worker there, and he’s facing both of Annie’s parents, but mostly it’s her dad who’s taking up his time right now.  How’s that feel, Kerry?

"I've fought monsters--this is just Annie's dad . . . I'd rather the monsters."

“I’ve fought monsters–this is just Annie’s dad . . . I’d rather the monsters.”

Hang in there, kid.  I’m sure I can give you more time tomorrow.

But for now, I gotta run, ’cause . . . stuff.  And things . . .

Willkommen in Wien: Das Setup

Well, now, it’s Yule Time in my world at this moment, and it’s time for the kids to get away and head for home.  And as you’ve probably noticed, the bad German in the post heading means they’re going someplace where German is spoken.  If you’re thinking, “Berlin,” wrong, because you only need look at my layouts to know where I’m going, and know that Wien means something else in English:

This means nothing to me/Oh, Vienna

“This means nothing to me/Oh, Vienna.”

If you remember from last year–yeah, about that time–when Annie left for home sweet home at Yule, she jaunted into Vienna.  And by now we know why we’re going to the airport, because The Foundation loves using airports for something besides flying . . .


(All excerpts from The Foundation Chronicles, Book Two: B For Bewitching, copyright 2015 by Cassidy Frazee)

Bernice Rutherford entered the waiting area of the Main Foundation Jaunt Transit Center located twenty meters under Terminal 3 of Vienna International Airport, having jaunted from London to the public center under Terminal 2 only ten minutes earlier. She scanned the room—about twenty by fifteen meters, with the main jaunt platform in another room just beyond a glass wall—and quickly counted just under a two dozen people. She knew they were there for the same reason she was there: children were returning from Salem for Yule holiday, and people were on-hand to take them home.

A number of the individuals gathered in the waiting area were like Bernice: case workers there picking up, for the most part, A and B Level students, though a few C and D Level students were still in need of transfer from here to their homes. In some cases one or both parents arrived with their child’s case worker, but most were waiting alone like her, and would leave as soon as their charge was ready to depart.

There actually wasn’t a need for Bernice to be in Vienna. Her charge lived in the United Kingdom which meant she should pick him up from the transit center under Heathrow, but an email she’d received on Wednesday informed her that her charge was entering Europe through another station, and she’d formulated a good idea why there was a change of venue.

She spotted a somewhat familiar face in the crowd, and as she head toward them to make her introductions, she wondered if they knew of this change in plans . . . “Hello, Mrs. Kirilova.”

Pavlina Kirilova turned towards the young black woman and spent only a moment searching her memory. “Bernice Rutherford, isn’t it?”

“Yes.” She held out her hand. “We met in Amsterdam when your daughter returned from her A Levels.”


Here we are, and I’m starting out the scene with the point of view not from the kids, but someone close to one of the kids.  It only makes sense that if Ms. Rutherford is in Vienna she’s probably going to run into someone who close to the other one of the kids, and she wasn’t disappointed.  And that other person remembers who Ms. Rutherford is close to as well–


Pavlina smiled as she shook the case worker’s hand. “My daughter and someone else, I believe.”

Bernice tightened her grip on the purse handles around her shoulder. “Yes—someone else.”

“Is that the reason you’re here?”

“Yes. Kerry emailed me Wednesday morning and told me he was returning through Vienna.” Bernice watched the face of Annie’s mother. “Were you aware he was coming?”

“Yes.” Pavlina glanced over Bernice’s shoulder, then shifted her gaze back. “The last letter from Annie informed me that Kerry was going to accompany her to Vienna, and from there he was going to either London or Cardiff.” She gave a quick shrug. “I received her last letter yesterday morning, though, so I didn’t have a chance to ask more about the change.”

“Oh, I see.” Based upon everything Bernice knew about Annie, it almost appeared as if the young woman was trying to head off a conversation by waiting until the last moment to inform her mother than she wasn’t traveling alone. “You could have contacted the school yesterday and asked for clarification.”

A few seconds went be before Pavlina chuckled. “Doing that would have made me look like one of those parents who micromanage their child’s life—and one thing I learned years ago is that Annie does as she likes. Contacting the school to speak with Annie—” She smiled while slowly shaking her head. “Besides, I trust Annie’s judgment: it’s not as if she’s doing something one might consider bad—”

“What are you two discussing?”


Yes, Annie’s mom knows all about Annie’s, um, friends.  Her close friends.  Her soul mates, you might say.  And here we learn that Annie waited until the very last minute to tell her mother that, hey, guess who’s jaunting into Vienna with me?  Not saying that Annie is being a little sneaky, but (1) she could have mentioned this at any time weeks before, and (2) she totally is.

But there’s really no harm here, because Annie’s mom has met Kerry, and Kerry her, and since they’re both headed for Europe why not leave together?  Kerry would have to kill time before leaving for London anything–because of the time difference he wouldn’t leave the school for another ninety minutes–and maybe they both thought it best to remove Kerry from a place where (1) Annie wasn’t around and (2) a certain red haired girl might throw caution to the wind and try something really stupid, which would lead to (3) Annie killing said girl, or at least messing her up bad.

But wait:  who is talking here at the end?  Because it’s obvious they’ve interrupted Pavlina–


Bernice turned and found a man about six centimeters taller than Pavlina standing to her right with short-clipped dark hair and brown eyes. He was dressed simply in jeans, tennis shoes, and a sweater. He wasn’t wearing a coat, but that was to be expected if he’d just jaunted from a home.

He handed a small cup of steaming liquid that Pavlina accepted without question. She took a small sip and nodded her approval. “Thank you, dear—oh, nothing much.” She turned to Bernice as she motioned towards the man who’d just joined them. “Bernice, I’d like you to meet my husband. Honey, this Ms. Rutherford.”


Remember me saying you’re going to meet someone you’ve never really met before?  Who has only actually appeared in the novel once, way back in the very first scene I wrote, which was Annie leaving for school.  He’s actually never appeared in the excerpts, but now, finally, you get to meet him.

Welcome, Annie’s father!


The man held out his hand. “Victor Kirilov. Pleased to meet you.”

She shook his hand. “Bernice Rutherford. It’s a pleasure to meet you.” She sighed out a breath. “And, if I may, congratulations on this last season.”

He appeared pleased. “We fought hard to reach third, so it was a welcomed podium.” He turned to his wife. “Did I hear you talking about Annie?”

Pavlina nodded. “Yes. Bernice is a case worker, and she’s here to pick up her charge.” She peered over the rim of her steaming beverage with large, dark eyes. “She knows Annie through her charge.”

“I see.” Victor turned to Bernice. “Are they someone in Annie’s level?”

Bernice fought hard to keep the grin off her face. “Yes, they are.” She shot a look at Pavlina, not certain who should be the one to do the reveal.

Annie’s mother saved her with a quick nod and a gleam in here eyes. “Honey, she’s here for Kerry.”

Victor required a few seconds before turning to his wife. “That Kerry?”


That Kerry?”  Sort of like, “That slime mold?”


“Yes, the one and the same.”

“Didn’t you say he lives in Wales?”

“He does, but apparently he’s coming home with our dearest daughter.”

“Hum.” He cast as quick glance in the direction of the jaunt platform. “I see.”

Pavlina smiled at the now grinning case worker. “I believe you will.”


Yes, I believe you will, Victor:  you will finally meet your dearest daughter’s one and only.  And he’ll get to meet you.

Yeah . . . this should be fun.

Generational Notices

I be all finished making observations in the observatory, for I have finished the first scene of this chapter.  It only took four hundred words last night and nine hundred words this morning, but I’m finished.  Good times, I tell you.

Also, this is a section that I have to refine in my mind just a little.  I knew there was going to be an exchange of some kind, but I wasn’t quite certain what it would be.  Then, once I started getting ideas about their discussion of the holiday out of the way, I realized that much of the talk would likely revolve around family.  And unlike Kerry, Annie has some family . . .


(All excerpts from The Foundation Chronicles, Book Two: B For Bewitching, copyright 2015 by Cassidy Frazee)

“Yes, well—” She pulled her head back revealing a huge smile. “One day you’ll visit for the holiday. One day soon. I promise.”

“One day.” He wanted to get away from talking about himself and wanted to hear more about the person he considered the most important in the world. “Did your parents get everything finalized for Yule?”

She nodded twice. “Yes, they did. They rented a private room at a hotel in Sofia. Everyone’s going to be there: my aunt, my cousins, and all my grandparents and great-grandparents.”

“Wow.” One of the letters Annie sent over the summer told Kerry of her immediate family: her grandparents, great-grandparent, and even a few great-great-grandparents. Of the three generations that preceded her, only her fraternal grandfather was no longer with them, having died in 1997 while serving with the Protectors. She told him this was one of the advantages of growing up in a family of witches: everyone lived so long that it was possible to grow up meeting four or five generations of family. “That’s a lot of people.”

“Quite a few, but we haven’t had a family gathering like this since my tenth birthday.”

He knew about the party, because they’d shared a dream that night: it was in that dream that Annie told Kerry she was a witch. “Why did you have such a big party for your tenth?”

“It was my first birthday with double-digits; no more single digit ages. My parents wanted it to be a special day.” Her smile carried a hint of sadness. “Won’t have many gatherings like that any more, since I won’t have any birthday’s at home any longer.”

“Not necessarily.” His fingers glided over the arm of her jacket. “Next year your birthday is on a Friday, and the next year it’s on a Saturday. Maybe . . .” Kerry lightly pressed his fingers against her exposed cheek. “If you ask real nice, maybe the headmistress will let you go home for a party.”

Her mood lightened instantly. “That would be fantastic. Two years from now?” Her eyes turned upwards towards her brows as she thought. “We’d start our D Levels then.”

“Yes, we would.”

“I wonder if the headmistress would allow me to take a guest?” She jutted her head forward and kissed Kerry. “By that time it would be a good time to have all my family meet you.”

“Ahumm . . .” The prospect of meeting Annie’s extended family filled him with a spot of dread. “Two years from now, huh?”

“Yes.” Her grin grew wider. “Give you plenty of time to ready yourself—”

“To meet everyone?”

Her tone grew introspective. “You are going to be a unique addition to our family, my love.”

“What do you mean?


It’s one thing for your girlfriend to say, “It’s probably time you meet my family,” because that’s an indication that you’re becoming part of their family.  In Annie’s case, however, there are four or five generations still alive, and nearly all of them could kill Kerry, or at least turn him into a newt.  And now we know that her father’s dad is gone, having died, one might say, in the line of duty for The Foundation.  Just so you know, because I know, Annie’s grandfather never saw her parents marry, as Annie’s folks didn’t marry until a year after her grandfather’s death.

Still, a lot of family to go through, and it sounds like Annie’s setting up Kerry for something.  And that would be . . ?


“Well . . .” Annie snuggled into her soul mate. “For one, you’ll be the first non-Bulgarian in five generations. I’ve a few ancestors on my father’s side who are from Romania—that’s where I get my Romani blood—but my maternal great-great-great grandmother was from Turkey, and she’s the last from outside Bulgaria. And you won’t just be the first non-Bulgaria, but the first non-European.

“Also, there hasn’t been anyone on either side of my family for six generations who came in as first generation Aware : the last was a grandfathers on my father’s side. While you’ve had witches in your family, there’s still enough generational separation that you’re thought of as coming from a Normal family.

“But lastly, and probably most important, I’m the last of the Kirilovis for my father’s line. My grandfather and great-grandfather both had brothers, so the line continues there, but from my father’s side, no: he had a sister and I’m an only child. When my aunt married she took her husband’s family name, and when I marry . . .” She found Kerry’s hand and held it tight. “I choose to take his family name.”

Kerry lay in a state that hovered between shocked and dismayed. “Gonna have a lot working against me, ain’t I?”

“No. It sounds like I’m putting pressure on you, but my family knows me: they know I’m my own girl.” Annie’s smile lightened the mood. “I choose my own loves and who I’ll marry. They know what will happen if they try to intervene.”


Kerry is non-Bulgarian, doesn’t come from a family of witches, and is marrying the last of this particular Kirilovi Line.  No pressure at all.  The one thing that Annie has going for her is that everyone in her family knows if they try to interfere in Annie’s love life, they’ll probably get turned into a newt, though the more likely route is they’re someone aware that darling Annie–who has studied a certain death spell starting at age nine–would probably tell them “Fuck off or die,” and that’s the end of that.  What Annie wants, Annie gets, and she gets the Ginger Hair Boy come hell or high water.

Don’t worry, though:  she sees an upside to this all:


“Still—” He took a deep breath. “I’m such an outsider.”

“Not to me.”

“And the whole ‘Last of the Kirilovi” thing—that’s kinda heavy. It’s like I’m doing something wrong.”

“My love, look at me—” Annie waited until she had his complete attention. “You’re missing what’s important. While I may not be a Kirilovi after we marry, I’ll become something better: a first generation Malibey witch, just like you. I’ll become the first matriarch of our magical family, and I consider that far more important than losing my old family name.”


Annie doesn’t see losing her old family name as a loss, she sees gaining a new family name as a win, because then she becomes Queen Witch of her own family.  And I wonder if it’ll be the same with Kerry:  what Annie wants, Annie gets.  It might be, because Annie’s about to lay down a little truth–


The sudden mood that came over Kerry vaporized and he smiled. “Humm . . . Clan Malibey. I like that.”

“We aren’t like that in our world.” She giggled. “We’re just like any other family that’s been around for a long time—”

“Only you do magic.”

“As do you, my dear. Here, I want to show you something—” Annie unzipped her winter jacket before taking his hand and slipping it under her sweater so it rested against her bare tummy. “Do you know what that is?”

He chuckled. “Your belly?”

“Yes, and something else—” Her voice dropped to a whisper. “Our children.”

Kerry froze for a moment, unsure of what to say next. In the last year there had been some discussion about their shared vision and what it meant, and he fully accepted, and welcomed, the fact that Annie would one day become his wife.

Now, however—he’d not given much thought to the other side of getting married, which was having children. The fact Annie and he existed was proof it happened, but until this moment it was something that happened to their parents—not to them . . .


Boom!  There is it.  First there’s love, then there’s marriage, and now Annie is letting Kerry know she’s got her eggs in storage simply waiting for the day when they can get their little family going.

"Don't worry, my love:  I have a bountiful womb, and our children will be many and--Kerry, where are you going?  Kerry?  Kerry?"

“Don’t worry, my love: I have a bountiful womb, and our children will be many and–Kerry, where are you going? Kerry? Kerry?”

When a girl, at age eight, writes down the name of the boy she knows she’s going to marry, and never changes that name, there’s also a pretty chance she’s thought about children as well.  Probably has their names written down as well.  But guys at that age?  Nu, uh.  Kerry’s thought about racing and holidays and holding hands and stuff of that nature, not . . . you know . . .


He slowly moved his fingers over her belly. “Kids, huh?”

Her eyebrows shot upwards as she smiled. “Yes.”

“I guess that would be something you’d think about. I mean, you will, um—”

“Carry them? Yes, I will. Of course, I’ll need some help getting pregnant—” She kissed the now deeply blushing Kerry before tenderly stroking his reddened cheek. “But when I do, I’ll carry our children happily and with great pride, my love.”

He turned his head and kissed her fingers. “So how many?”

“Oh . . . More than one, certainly. We won’t raise an only child like we were raised.” She finally unzipped his jacket so she touch him through his sweater. “We’ll have a wonderful family of witches.”

Kerry warmed his hand against Annie’s side. “But that’s for later—”

“Much later. I’m not ready to start a family tonight.”


Thanks for not wanting to start that family tonight, Annie!  You got a night ahead of you–which they are going to spend together, you totally know this–and then the journey home for Yule.  The fun thing to consider is at this rate, something tells me Kerry’s mom is going to have something else to bitch about, because they are certainly working their way towards another taking to from Nurse Coraline.  At least they’ll be no getting prego on her watch . . .

Still, it’s nice to see that Annie can find something to get Kerry embarrassed, and it’s a nice way to show that Annie is so much mature than Kerry, because she’s thinking about being a mommy and raising her own brood of witches, and Kerry’s totally going all derpy face over the her statements.  But he’s still there, and as he’d say, he’s not running.  He’s bright enough to know that getting the girl witch for the long run means getting the kids that come with the girl witch.  That’s the deal, dude:  the magic doesn’t come without a little responsibility.

And given that they’ve both already faced death together, there’s nothing wrong about contemplating the creation of life and bringing a few tiny Malibey witches into the world.

Wonder who long before one of them starts talking about Team Chestnut Ginger?

Cold Facts Upon the Cold Tower

Though it feels like I wasn’t about to get a lot finished last night, I surprised myself–must as I’d done the night before.  For one, I had to drive out to the local car dealership to have a safety recall performed on my car, then I stayed for an oil and air filter change.  While there I managed to get a couple of hundred words written.

Yeah, the Lady Writer hard at work doing selfies between scribbling.

Yeah, the Lady Writer hard at work doing selfies between scribbling.

After getting out of there I got a quick bite on the road and headed back to the hovel to write seven hundred or so words to get my total to just a little nine hundred twenty-five.  Not a bad time for a scene that I had a lot of trouble starting.

It’s Yule, and that means it’s time to get the kids out of the school and back home to the parental units.  This means Annie and Kerry are getting split up–again!–and they have to do nice holiday things.  For Annie this means hanging with her parents and probably getting, I don’t know, the book Twenty Ways to Kill People Who Piss You Off, while Kerry will probably stay in his room worried his mother is going to ask him if he’s still masturbating before warning him that girls–like The One Who Writes–have ways to drive boys going through puberty crazy.  I don’t know, maybe she’ll ask Kerry if Annie makes a mean milkshake.

But that’s in the future.  Let’s deal with the now–


(All excerpts from The Foundation Chronicles, Book Two: B For Bewitching, copyright 2015 by Cassidy Frazee)

It was just after twenty-one when Annie and Kerry touched down on the viewing platform that ran around the upper level of Observatory Tower. Kerry brought his broom to a light touchdown just inside the open dome, while the free-flying Annie soared over his head before setting down about two meters away. While Kerry placed his broom inside his private Hammerspace, Annie headed for the locker where the blankets and heavy comforters were kept. She returned with two comforters as Kerry finished setting up a two-person recliner where they could look outside.

Annie pulled a couple of small pillowed from her Hammerspace and set them on the recliner before sitting down. Kerry waited for her to settle in and get comfortable before joining her. Together they pulled one of the comforters over them, keeping the other one in reserve in case they grew chilled. After only a minute they were comfortable and warm, pressed shoulder-to-shoulder under their blanket.

Normally the sky over the school was clear because of the enchantment found in the defense screens that bore through the light pollution surrounding Cape Ann. With tomorrow the beginning of Yule Holiday, that enchantment was shut down until student returned to school, so rather than looking up into a totally dark sky, Annie and Kerry saw the lights of Rockport and Gloucester reflecting off the low winter clouds slowly moving in from the Atlantic.

The couple lay under their cover holding hands in silence. Since meeting up in Berlin on 25 August they’d remained together for all but one night and day, and now, almost four months later, they would separate and return home for the holidays. Their mood this time was different: where as the year before Annie faced her return with stoic grimness and Kerry found it almost impossible to keep the depression of being away from his loved one for two weeks, this time they’d exchange a couple of letters over the holidays, and be back in each other’s arms in another two weeks.

Though they didn’t want the separation, it was something they would survive. And the return would be that much sweeter.


So the kids are off to the Observatory:

Remember this place?

Remember this place?

And if you look closely, you’ll see two figures standing out on the Viewing Platform–probably my kids thinking about going up there to hang out for the night.  Which is exactly what these two are gonna do.  It makes you wonder if anyone else ever thinks about heading up to the open dome to hang out, and so far we’ve not seen anyone, but that doesn’t mean one of the reasons the observatory dome is open when nothing is going on is because they know this can be a popular hangout–if you have a way of flying up to the dome.  Which both my kids totally have.

I just realized that I do need to indicate how they’re dressed.  It’s only a little above freezing outside, which means they’re in their winter coats and sweaters and jeans, and in Annie’s case thick socks and boots.  Yeah, can do that tonight.

With them snugly under the comforter, their minds begin to drift and wonder . . .


Annie finally rolled to her left and kissed Kerry’s cheek. “What are you thinking about, my love?”

“You.” He kissed her back, only on the lips instead of the cheek. “My little sarmi at home in the snowy mountains of Bulgaria—” He slid his left arm over her body and held her close to him. “All alone.”

She chuckled. There was something ridiculously romantic about being called a little cabbage roll, though she wondered if anyone but her mother would understand the feeling . . . “I won’t be completely alone: I’ll be with my family.”

“True: you’ll have them.” He stared into her deep, hazel eyes. “I wish I could be there.”

“You could.” Annie adjusted her position so she wasn’t looking at Kerry cross-eyed. “I could ask my parents if you could visit.”

“It’d be too much trouble; I’m not out yet, remember?” He referred to the fact that his existence as a witch remained unknown to his parents. “I think it might be difficult convincing them that your parents want to fly me out of London during the busiest time of the year—” He rubbed his cooling nose against hers. “—just so I can visit a girl to whom I write .”

She giggled. “You do more than write.”

“I know. But they’d wonder what was up if I was only there for a couple of days.”

“Humm.” She tapped the fingers of her right hand against his side. “Well, for one, my father can afford to fly you down because he could—”

“I know.”

“And two—why do you think it’d be only a couple of days?”


I just has this conversation yesterday with one of my readers, who obviously is dreamwalking me or something, because this is one of the things that’s been going around in my head for a while–if Annie and Kerry could hook up during Yule Holiday, would they?  As Annie indicates, it’s not a problem for Papa to look as if he’s flying the boy down for the holiday–if he wanted to, he could probably ask the F1 team to bring him down on the company jet, which they could if they wanted to make it look like Kerry was traveling Normal Style.  In reality he’d just jaunt right to the house, and leave the jet to fly off to wherever.

So, yeah, I’ve thought about this for a while.  And Kerry, ever the realist, has as well–


The revelation that Annie would invite him to stay in Bulgaria for more than a few days surprised him. He knew she was used to getting what she wanted, but convincing her parents to let a boy they had only heard about second-hand was something he didn’t think she could manage. Besides . . . “Even if you got your parents to agree, I think my would say no.”

“Not even if you told them your girlfriend is rich?” Annie began grinning manically. “Or at least is the member of well to do family?”

“I thought you didn’t like to tell people you or you’re family has money?”

“I wouldn’t tell your parents—” She barely touched his cheek. “You would.”

Kerry considered the possibility for about five second. “While a tempting officer . . .” He shook his head. “I can’t do it, Darling.”

“Why not, my love?”

“My parents . . . I know them, and while throwing money around got them to send me to school, the moment I start mentioning money and a ‘rich girlfriend’, they’re gonna wanna know more about you and your family, and—” He slowly rubbed her back and sadly gazed back into her darkening face. “I still gotta keep the witch thing hidden for now.”

She wanted to argue that he was wrong, but in a moment Annie saw what Kerry was doing: He’s protecting my family and me. It’s not that he wants to be miserable, that’s that he doesn’t want us in trouble with The Foundation. She pressed her face against his. “I understand, my love. You’re being selfless.”

“I wish I wasn’t—” He brushed his lips against her cheeks. “I’d rather be with you.”

“Yes, well—” She pulled her head back revealing a huge smile. “One day you’ll visit for the holiday. One day soon. I promise.”


Kerry’s already anticipating problems with nosy parents, and he’s also likely wondered if Annie’s parent really would want him on the homestead for the holidays.  He could just see them now:  “So Kerry’s here for a couple of days–oh, the rest of the week?  And where is he going to stay?  The lake house?  Your house, one you sneak off to all the time, Annie?”  In all seriousness, now that Annie has kind of admitted she likes sleeping next to Kerry, how long before Annie gets tired of sleeping in her bed in the main house and wanders down to the lake house to see if Kerry is in any need of cuddling?

Not long, me thinks.

Let’s also face it:  Kerry’s parents are a bit dickish, and they’d want to speak with Annie’s folks and know more about them, and start wondering why they live up in the mountains away from everyone else, and why they built a house for their nine year old daughter, and what are their daughter’s intentions for their son, and . . . it would likely get messy, because they’d just be super pains in the asses for everyone.

As much as it pains Kerry, he knows getting away for the holidays isn’t something that going to happen in the next week.  However, that doesn’t mean they can’t talk about those occasions–and what they’re going to do for the current holiday.

I mean, there's plenty of room to do all that.

I mean, there’s plenty of room to do all that.

And this is when you’re going to find out some interesting, fun facts about Kerry’s Little Sarmi . . .

Down On the Deck: Home By the Sea

Here I was, yesterday, saying I wanted to finish this scene and chapter, and guess what?  Did!  Totally did.  No, really.

See?  No brag, just truth.

See? No brag, just truth.

And as you can see Chapter Seventeen awaits, where it’s a week later and–humm.  Looks like the kids are heading home for the holidays.  Yes, it’s that time, when the school shuts down for two weeks and all the kids go home to see their parents.  And if you look closely, you can see that Kerry is heading back to Cardiff and Annie is heading back to Pamporovo.

Actually, Chapter’s Seventeen and Eighteen deal with the kids being away from each other–the first scene of Chapter Sixteen is one of only two times you’ll see the kids together the next two chapters–but that’s in the future, and right now we’re finishing up the present, and it’s time to get my kids together again.


(All excerpts from The Foundation Chronicles, Book Two: B For Bewitching, copyright 2015 by Cassidy Frazee)

The dots on within the image had already crossed half the map when Nurse Bianca called the deck and informed the girls that Nurse Thebe and she were downstairs with warming blankets. Alex was able to get off a quick thank you when Kerry called in. “Flight Deck, this is Overnight. On my mark lowing to four hundred kph and beginning our decent.” He paused for about six seconds before continuing. “And . . . mark.”

Emma, as group pilot, gave the overall command. “Overnight, slow to four hundred kph and follow us down.”

Penny kept her eyes on the display, watching the dots descend towards Cape Ann. She nodded her approval. “Smart move. Forty kilometers out, coming in at four hundred kph—”

“They’ll be here in ten minutes.” Annie figured out the plan during the time Kerry informed them.

“A little more, actually.” Alex waved her hand over a pad. “Lights up on the roof and the Clock Tower. They should be able to see us now.”

“And we need to do now is lay out a landing pattern.” Alex walked over to the window and looked out onto the darkened meadow. “And light a few fires to everyone can warm up on the spot.”

“Good idea.” Penny tapped Annie on the arm. “You’re helping, right?”

“I wouldn’t miss this for the world.” Annie gave the display another look. “You think I’m waiting up here—”

“—While he’s down there? Nope.” Penny tapped near her ear piece. “Overnight, this is Flight Deck. We have the Flight School overhead lights and the Clock Tower beacon lit, and we’re going to set up your landing grid for you. Over.”

Emma returned with the acknowledgment. “Roger, Flight Deck. Should be on the ground soon. Over.”

All three girls were about to turn from the hologram when Kerry’s voice broadcast through the room. “Hang on, Overnight: A little homecoming music is in order. Hit it.” Immediately four loud guitar cords rang out followed by a heavy drum and bass rhythm. A few seconds later the vocals rang out: “Home by the sea/home by the sea—”

Annie chuckled. “I’ve heard this one before.”

Penny stared at the dots in the tank with a smile on her face. “Bloody hell.”

“That’s my Darling.” Annie grabbed the coats and levitated them towards the girls. “They’ll be her in a few minutes.”


Once more the Flight Deck is running pretty smoothly considering it’s being run by three teenage girls.  They got the action down.  This is why when the bad guys came calling, the school just locked shit up and put the kids out there with the adults, because nothing is crazier than a teenage witch.

“That’s my Darling.”  I actually loved writing that line, because if there’s something Annie’s doing this year, it’s getting loosened up around people.  Well, people she likes.  Other bitches best watch out or they’ll get a lightening bolt shot their way.

And here we have Kerry bring everyone home with music–He’d actually sort of foreshadowed this back on PEI:


“Already figured that out.” He pushed the map display to his right until they were looking at the western coast of Nova Scotia. “Right there.” He marked the point. “About as west as you can get before you run out of land. Which means . . .” He sketched a line to the southwest until he encountered a well-known point of land. “Rockport. And our home by the sea just to the west.” He quickly connected the marked points on the map, creating a line from their current location back to the school. “There’s it is: that’s the route.”


“Our home by the sea”.  So what song does he play coming in?  Why, Home By the Sea, what else?

Not only does he play it, he plays it loud:


All three girls hurried downstairs and found Bianca and Thebe waiting just outside the main hangar door. Penny began pointing to different spots around them. “Alex, set up three fires on the right, I’ll do the same on the left. Let’s get them in a large semi-circle.” She pointed straight ahead. “Annie, could you set up a row of lights for about twenty, thirty meters, maybe five meters apart?”

“Not a problem.” Annie rose about a half-meter off the ground and crafted a white light source on the ground before floating out about five meters to do the same thing again. She did this five more times, setting up a thirty meters runway for the flight to line up on and bring them into the group of fires Alex and Penny created.

She floated back to where the girls and nurses stood. Annie adjusted her wool cap and glanced skyward. “Do you hear that?”

Alex looked up and grinned. “Music?”

“Yes.” Annie grinned wildly. “Kerry must have it his tablet loudspeakers.”

“Jeez.” Penny shook her head. “Vicky must not worry they’re going to be heard from the ground.”

“It’s not like any of the Normals would see them.” She pointed towards the southeast. “I think that’s them.”

Annie saw two sets of yellow-white lights moving off to her right: one seemed to indicate where to turn, and the other seemed to point downward. The continued moving to her left as they now appeared to quickly lose altitude over the east wall. At the north end of the meadow tree line the lights continued swinging to the left, then stopped and began approaching her.

She heard Penny giving instruction for the flight as they lined up on the makeshift runway. The music was easily discernible now, and she could now clearly make out the lead flight, bundled up tight against the cold, with nary a square . Kerry pointed downward with his left hand until they were within touching distance of the ground, at which point he flattened his hand and spread out the lights at his fingertips, while Emma waved her right hand overhead to slow the group, then pumped a fist into the air bringing the flight to a complete stop. The last few lines of the song played—”Cause you won’t get away/So with us you will stay/For the rest of your days/Sit down/As we relive our lives in what we tell you”—before Kerry punched his tablet and shut down the song.

Emma pulled down her balaclava before looking backwards over her shoulder. “Dismount.” She was off her broom a few seconds later as Kerry pulled down his balaclava and slipped his goggles up onto his forehead.

Each of the girls grabbed a couple of warming blanket. Annie immediately made clear which team she was going to treat. “I’ve got the lead.”

Penny chuckled. “Figured that.”

Annie saw Kerry drop his backpack and come around the front of his broom and hold up his right hand for Emma to slap. They exchanged a quick nod before Kerry turned towards Annie, a huge grin affixed upon his face. “There you are.”

“Here I am.” She secured one of her blankets around Emma’s shoulders before doing the same to Kerry. “You need this.” Standing this close she saw patches of frost on his parka, and noticed his glasses were partially fogged. “Come on, both you—” She took Kerry’s hand and waved for Emma to follow. “Come warm up.”


Kerry does a quick high-five with Emma–who seems to have a good pair of lungs on her and likes being in control–and then he’s like, “Open arms for my Sweetie!”  Annie’s being nice handing a blanket to Emma, but then she’s not going to be a bitch a ignore her like someone used to do her.  And there’s frost on Kerry’s parka–probably from when he warmed up coming down to the school.  The temps went up considerably, believe that.


The entire flight had left their backpacks next to their brooms and was now crowding around the fires as the nurses examined a few of those students seen shivering. The two instructors went from student to student asking them them how they felt, patting each on the shoulder. Vicky checked on Emma before turning to Kerry. “I see you’re in good hands.”

Kerry wrapped his blanketed arms around Annie. “In the best, Nightwitch.”

“As I thought.” She stepped towards the middle of the runway. “Okay, listen up—” She raised here voice so everyone could hear. “As soon as you’re warmed up and feeling better, move your brooms and your packs to the hanger—do not unpack them now—then go get something to eat. As there’s no racing tomorrow, we’ll have a debriefing at nine, and after that we’ll unpack and put away our gear. And anyone who doesn’t want to change now let me know and I’ll have housekeeping move your clothes back to your dorm rooms.” She flipped her parka hood back, removed her wool hat and flight helmet, and shook out her hair after stripping off her balaclava. “It was a pleasure flying with all of you.”

“Hey.” Emma pulled her blanket tight as she stepped closer to Annie and Kerry. “I’m gonna see if Nadine will give me a jaunt to the Dining Hall.”

“No problem.” He grinned back at his wingmate. “After flying a couple of thousand kilometers, I think we’ll walk back.”

“Okay, then: catch you later.” She gave them both a wave and walked off.

Finally alone, Annie unzipped Kerry’s parka, pushed back his hood, and removed his head gear, dropping it to the ground next to them. “Feeling better?” She slipped her arms under his parka and around his torso.”

“I am now.” He leaned his head against her shoulder. “What’d you do last night?”

“Hung out with the girls and Jairo.” She felt comfortable and secure against Kerry’s body. “Penny and Alex had me over to sleep with them: they asked Professor Semplen to get housekeeping to move another bed into their room. They said they didn’t want me sleeping alone.”

Kerry held tightly on to Annie. “That was nice of them.”

“It was.” She whispered into his ear. “Did you miss me?”

He moved Annie back so her face was mere centimeters aware, then kissed her slowly for almost twenty second. “Oh, Darling—” He pulled her into a warm embrace. “Every second I was away.”

“So did I, my love—” Annie closed her eyes and held on tightly to her soul mate, least she slide to the ground. “So did I.”


No racing, just Midnight Madness after a little dinner and a cup of something warm, and some warm arms to lay in.  Annie got to do a bit of a sleepover with her covenmates, and Kerry is giving her a long, lingering kiss in a fire-lit PDA, probably because his lips are cold.  Yeah, that’s what it is.

Everyone’s home in what turned out to be a long chapter–one of the longest, actually–and now it’s time to send the kids away for a few weeks.

Where a few more surprises await them . . .