Three Years Down the Road

Anything interesting happen to you on this day, Cassidy?

Why, I’m glad you asked…

7 July, 2014, I headed out to Sterling, NJ, to see a doctor.  Actually, I was seeing her for the second time in two weeks because I’d had an initial consultation with her at the end of June.  This time I wasn’t going back for a check up, or for another consultation, or to even discuss possible medical options.

I was going there to get a shot.

As many of you know, during May of 2014 I decided to take a big step in my transition and get on the Estradiol train.  As Kerry can now tell you, Estradiol is the primary hormone found in that soup known as estrogen and it’s the most powerful of the lot.  You start taking that and before you know it, your body starts heading off down Girl Street.  And that was where I wanted to head, so the time came that in order to go that way I had to find a doctor.  Which I did.  In New Jersey.

And three years ago today I received my first injection.

It was really kind of interesting to watch her, my doctor, go through the steps I’d need to follow in order to inject myself in the leg.  I watched, I learned, and I sat there while I got the needle in the leg.  It was a life changing experience, it really was, and I was in sort of a daze all the way on the two-hour drive back to Harrisburg.

And since some of you don’t remember what I was like back there, here’s a reminder.

Man… I have a hard time believing I was this person.

 

Yep, that was me right after I returned home, fraying wig, old glasses, and bushy eyebrows to complete the look.  At this point in my life I was still going to work as “that other guy” and the next day I dressed like the person I used to pretend I was and headed off to work.

Only I was a little different.  And I’d get more different every day.

Two weeks later I had to return to my doctor’s office for another injection, only this time I was required to do the injection.  Which I did.  My doctor told me at the time that she expected me to get it right the first time because she knew I would.  I’m glad I didn’t let her down.

And that brings me to this point in time.  Three years later, I’m pretty happy with myself.  I’ve worked on a political campaign, I’ve marched against the Orange Menace, I’ve gotten more left and aware, and I’ve joined roller derby.  Oh, and I’m still writing after all these years.

Plus, I certainly look a lot better now than I did three years ago.

Yeah, I’m almost quite the looker right after rolling out of bed.

 

I don’t know what’s ahead.  Three years from now I’ll be 63 and likely doing much of the same things I’m doing now.  Maybe I’ll be published by then–maybe not.  Maybe I’ll have competed in a derby game–maybe not.  Maybe I won’t even be here–maybe not.

I don’t know:  I’m not Deanna so I can’t see the future.  All I can do is live from one moment to the next and hope for the best.

And when my fourth anniversary rolls around I’ll talk about it and shoot another picture of myself, just so I know what I look like.

Though I look a little strange when I’m shot through a dirty lens.

 

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Finally At the End of Time

As much as I would’ve liked to write last night, I had a TV recap to get out and that took up the majority of my time.  Still, I’m about thirty-five hundred words up and I should get a few hundred more tonight.  As long as you keep writing, things are going to be okay.

I’m finally able to bring Kerry’s lesson to an end.  He’s had a lot of time to talk about time, which means it’s time for him to stop talking about time.  But before he goes, he has to give a bit of an explanation about his last practical experiment.  Because there’s an extremely important lesson to be learned in it…

 

(The following excerpts from The Foundation Chronicles, Book Three: C For Continuing, copyright 2016, 2017 by Cassidy Frazee)

 

He walked slowly towards the end of the semi circle where Naomi sat and stopped when he was a couple of meters in front of her. “You wanted to know what I could do with the spell like the one I’ve demonstrated? You could use it to momentarily accelerate yourself so that if you needed to get out of a jam you could actually run away faster than people could pursue you. Or you could use it to speed yourself up to complete the task. Or, if someone was about to hurt you and you had time to get a spell like that around you, you could either subdue them, knock them out, or even kill them.”

Kerry nodded to his left, down towards the far end of the room where Wednesday was finally removing the barrier. “If I’d hit anyone in the chest with that tennis ball, the chances are pretty good that if I hadn’t killed them they’d be in the hospital for a long stay. But it’s more likely I would’ve killed them.”

He walked to the far end of the room where he had thrown the tennis ball and retrieved a few things that had fallen to the floor. When he returned to face the students he dropped the burnt, shattered fragments of the tennis ball at his feet. “This is what’s left of the ball after it discharged all of the kinetic energy from it’s velocity. Now, the shield Wednesday put up was designed to absorb energy and dissipate it into the safety enchantment, so it’s a lot sturdier than anyone’s body. So instead of disintegrating as if I’d thrown it into one of you, it’s likely it would’ve collapsed your chest, torn off most of your outer skin, and probably made your organs explode.

“But here’s something you need to keep in mind: just because I could accelerate myself and throw a tennis ball at someone as fast as a Class 1 PAV, that doesn’t mean I want to do the same thing and then get into hand-to-hand combat. Punching someone while you’re accelerated is going to hurt them, but it’s also going to hurt you. An arm, a wrist, and a hand are just as soft and pliable under accelerated time as they are under Normal time, and throwing an accelerated punch into another person is going to feel like you’re hitting a wall. You may do a lot of damage to the person you hit, but you are for sure going to mess up your own arm as well.”

Pang stretched out his legs as he folded his hands across his stomach. “So jacking up your own personal time wouldn’t help you out a lot when fighting.”

Kerry looked down as he grinned. “Not unless you know what you’re doing.”

Like everyone else in the room, Pang knew that Annie and Kerry were in Advanced Self Defense and Weapons. “But you’ve probably figured out how to do it, right?”

“And that is a lesson for another time.” Not wanting to get into a long, drawn-out discussion of how accelerated time could be used in combat, Wednesday walked up behind Kerry and placed her hand on his shoulders. “Let’s all thank Kerry for giving us this demonstration. It was very informative, as well as being interesting.” She waited for him to return to his seat before she continued. “So now you have an idea of some of the things we’re going to work on tonight. Let me get the room set up so that we have our lab tables, and then we can begin.”

She took a couple of steps back for stopping and smiling. “And don’t feel as if you have to rush things tonight. Remember… We have plenty of time.”

 

If Kerry has already thought out the ramifications of what would happen if he accelerated his own personal time considerably and then punch someone, it also means that he’s figured out the ramifications of how to prevent his own arm from exploding when he performs said punch.  Because it’s not like him to think, “Wow, if I kick my own time up to five times greater than Normal and then slap someone, I could take their face off!”  Except he knows that if he does that, he’d probably rip off his own hand in the process.

But what other type of magic is Kerry really good at?  Something about transforming?  Like I said, he’s thought out the ramifications…

Now that were finished with Advanced Spells, it’s time for Annie and Kerry to go to their special advanced class.  One where they won’t only learn about how to do magic in this world, but do magic in another–

Real Time Time Applications

Yes, I actually started a new chapter last night. Which also means the start of the new scene.  While I didn’t start out with another thousand word night, I did manage to get just over five hundred and fifty words.  In considering I was having to think up a bit of history about the school the whole time, I consider that a good beginning.

This is how good beginnings look.

A couple of quick things.  The first three scenes happen within a few days of each other. In case you’re wondering 22 September, 2013, is a Sunday.  This means that the second scene, as well is the third, occur on the day Annie and Kerry have Advanced Self Defense and Weapons class, which means or whatever they are doing happens in class.  And any time you see a scene titled Testing Kali, figure it has to do with that scene from the trailer where Annie and Kerry appeared to be fighting off a group of zombies.

As for that last scene?  27 September, 2013, is Annie’s birthday.  Only I’m going to write this scene up just a little differently than I have the last two birthday scenes, so it’s going to come off in the story just a bit differently than in the other novels.  No big deal; I just wanted to change things up a bit.

Now, let’s head back to the classroom…

Kerry has already shown an exploding tennis ball and it was very entertaining. However, he just did something else with the time spell that didn’t cause a tennis ball to explode, and Serafina wanted to know why.  Being the nice student/teacher that he is, Kerry’s about to tell her and the rest of the class–

 

(The following excerpts from The Foundation Chronicles, Book Three: C For Continuing, copyright 2016, 2017 by Cassidy Frazee)

 

Kerry replied as soon as he was certain he understood the question. “Treontdn’t—” A second later he nodded at normal speed, so this time his words didn’t come out sounding like accelerated gibberish. “The reason it didn’t is because only way that you can change your own time and still sort of interact with the unchanged world is to pull the field so tight around your body that us sort of wear it as a second skin.” He ran his open hand over his right arm. “When I had this time field in place it was like only millimeters thick across my body, which meant while I was moving five times faster than you guys I could also reach out and touch any of you—” He held up the tennis ball. “Or grab this without it doing something weird due to Normal physics.”

A number of surprised looks passed between the older students while Naomi and Subhan appeared slightly shocked by a concept that no one in the regular B Level Spells class likely even imagined. Pang sat back her up his hands. “Geez, man, I’d have never figured that one out.”

Nadine, on the other hand, was interested in figuring out the various complexities of the spell. “So, how would you do a spell that’s going to affect stuff outside your time field?”

“Oh, that.” Kerry touched his lip You have to open up micro holes in the time field so that you can access unaltered time and craft spells within that time frame. Depending on your personal time frame it’s going to seem like you’re crafting exceptionally slow or exceptionally fast, so you need to take the difference into consideration so you don’t screw up your crafting.” He shrugged. “Or enlarge the field just enough to craft in your own space and then drop it from around the spell once you’re finished.”

Nadine slung her right arm over the back of her chair as she crossed her legs. “Oh, is that all?”

 

It’s a good thing Nadine and Kerry are Friends, otherwise people would likely think Nadine was being an insufferable smartass.  And to a lot of students at Salem, that’s exactly how she comes off.  But that’s the way Nadine is: she comes off as rather gruff and straightforward to a lot of students, and they don’t like her because that.  You really have to know her to understand her.   And that’s not always an easy thing, because she doesn’t always let people into her inner circle.  Annie and Kerry have been lucky in that she’s become friends with them; not everyone at the school has been that fortunate.

And this leads up to his next teaching moment–

 

The whole room joined her in laughter, even Kerry, who looked down with a sheepish expression. “Yeah, I do make it sound a lot easier than it is. But that’s really the gist of how one should craft the spell. It takes some time to figure it out, however: Annie and I worked on it for a few days here, and I spent time over the summer visualizing how it should work. So I have a bit of a head start on everyone.”

Naomi finally found the courage to raise her hand. “Excuse me.” She looked at all the other students as if to make certain it was okay for her to speak before turning to Kerry. “Even though you can do this, how useful is it really? I mean, I can understand maybe being able to speed up crafting spells, but why else would it be useful?”

It wasn’t necessary for Kerry to think upon an answer: he’d anticipated the possibility this question would be asked by one of the B Levels and he had already prepared a response. “I think it would be better if I show you what I could do instead of tell you.” He turned to Wednesday. “Think you can help me out again?”

“Sure thing.” Wednesday walk down to the far end of the classroom and crafted a huge dark barrier that covered a significant portion of the wall. When she was finished she walked back about half the distance between her crafted barrier and Kerry impressed yourself up against the wall opposite where the students were sitting. She nodded slowly. “Go ahead.”

 

Up next is some more of that “science stuff” that shouldn’t have any place in a story about witches and magic, but damn it all, sometimes you gotta go there.  I mean, Kerry has to deal with g forces when he’s racing, so why shouldn’t there be some science here?

The answer is we have it.  And it’s like this:

 

Kerry levitated a tennis ball out of the box once they had left behind and left it hovering within arms reach while he stood as he had before when crafting the previous time spell. When he was finished he snatched the tennis ball out of the air with his right hand and transferred it to his left hand. He stood still for just a second and quickly drew his left arm back and tossed the tennis ball.

The tennis ball flew so quickly across the room as to be impossible to follow. It seemed to have just left Kerry’s hand when it crashed into Wednesday’s black barrier with a loud crack followed by a sudden burst of light, flame, and heat as it was was enveloped in the dark shroud. Nearly all the students jumped the second the room was filled with the sound of the ball’s impact: even Wednesday threw up her left arm as if to guard against the heat emanating from the far end of the room.

Kerry waited for the excited students to calm down before he addressed Naomi. “That’s one of the things that you can do. I did the same thing that Wednesday did: I gave the ball and underhand toss that would ascend to the cross the room at about seventy kilometers an hour. Only the big difference between what Wednesday did and what I did is that she threw her ball in the time field were encompassed and now—which is to say, Normal time—and I accelerated my personal time to five times greater than Normal time.

“When I tossed the ball, it appeared to me that I wasn’t throwing in any faster than Wednesday through hers, which is to say it wasn’t traveling at anymore than seventy kilometers an hour. However, with my time since accelerated all of my actions were also accelerated by a factor of five, so the ball in this Normal time left my hand going five times faster than that—which means when it hit that barrier down there it did so going about three hundred and fifty kilometers an hour. You probably couldn’t even track the flight because it was moving as fast as Riv, Nadine, and I can move when we’re racing flat out on a straight—and if you happen to be standing near a course when we go by at that speed, you can’t follow us, either.

“Wednesday’s barrier was designed to not only keep the ball from blasting a hole through the wall, but, with the help of the safety enchantments, to absorb the kinetic energy released when it came to a complete stop. What she created was something similar to what we use on the race courses, ‘cause going into a barrier at over three hundred kilometers an hour means you’ve got a dissipate a lot of energy. Otherwise—” He pointed a thumb at the barrier at the other end of the room. “You’re gonna get an explosion.

“And if you want to get an idea of how big will the explosion… I did the math on our tennis ball before class and figure the amount of energy released in this little demonstration was approximately 2.835 times 10 to the ninth power ergs. If you want to know what that much energy can do—” The right corner of his mouth curled upwards. “Technically, there’s enough energy there to vaporize the human body, with the TNT equivalent being approximately seven hundred kilograms.” Kerry smiled as he turned his gaze from one student to the next. “As you might imagine, our brooms would make a far bigger boom if they could explode like that.”

 

Yeah, bitch!  Science!  And yes, my calculations were correct:  Kerry’s tennis ball coming to a complete stop would have released enough energy to vaporize a human, in that it would have flashed all the fluids instantly into steam.  And since he likes to talk about this–

He’s gonna tell you all about getting hit with a super fast ball.

It’s lots of fun.

He Blinded Me With Time Science!

All sorts of writing yesterday followed by all sorts of political stuff.  It was a busy day and it feels like the week is slowing up a bit, which is good.

Now, tonight I’m going to try and finish up Chapter Ten.  I really, really, really believe I have a few hundred words left and that will allow me to get into the next chapter, which I’m eager to do ’cause Chapter Eleven, besides being one more, is gonna be fun.  Trust me.

Now we get into time.  And time is–well, it’s not what you think.  In fact, you can do some interesting things with it…

 

(The following excerpts from The Foundation Chronicles, Book Three: C For Continuing, copyright 2016, 2017 by Cassidy Frazee)

 

“Okay, great. Let me get set.” For a few moments Kerry appeared to be measuring out a cube of space maybe a half meter on each side. As soon as he dropped his hands to his sides the faint outlines of the floating cube became visible. “What I did here was create a confined space where the time inside is moving twenty-five times slower than us. That means for every twenty-five seconds we experience, only one second passes inside this area.” He kept at least a meter from the cube as he addressed the class. “And one of the reasons you’re just able to make it out is because light is being slowed as it passes through this field, and while it’s pretty insignificant in relationship to how fast light travels, the difference is just enough to give it this ghostly outline.

“Now, were going to do a little experiment here to show you what happens when you set up a field like this and then attempt to interact with it from outside in the Normal world.” Kerry took two steps back from his floating cube time field and nodded at Wednesday. “Go ahead, toss it.”

Wednesday grabbed a tennis ball from the box and gave it a fairly quick underhand lob toward the field. It hit the field and appeared to freeze in midair, but it became quickly apparent that something else was happening.

As the ball slipped excruciatingly slow into the field the opposite end of the ball compressed slightly, as if the ball had struck a wall. But instead of bouncing back it continued forward and it’s now snail pace, to the compressed part of the ball appeared as if it were rebounding away. Seconds later the ball’s yellow fuzz located at the time field interface quickly darkened and began smoking before bursting outward from the cube in a massive eruption of fire. Within five seconds all of the ball outside the time field was engulfed in flames that were nearly a meter in diameter.

 

Great ball of fire!  Yeah, you didn’t get flaming tennis balls at Hogwarts–hell, half the students didn’t know what a tennis ball was.  Now there is a reason for this happening, and that’s where that science I keep promising comes in.  You have been warned and I’m proceeding.

 

Kerry waited for the flames to die down a bit before addressing the class. “What happened here is a simple matter of Normal physics encountering Aware time manipulation. Before everyone got here I had Wednesday toss a couple of tennis balls across the room so I could get an idea of how fast she could throw one. What you saw was a toss that would allow the ball to cover five meters in about a quarter of a second, which works out to around seventy kilometers an hour.

“If you were watching you saw the ball hit the cube and try to rebound, but it couldn’t because it’s still technically moving forward.” He pointed at the still moving ball which was now about a quarter of the way into the time field. “Normally, if it had hit a solid wall, kinetic energy would’ve caused it to fly back towards Wednesday. But that couldn’t happen because the ball itself is still traveling forward, albeit at a much slower speed. Yet, all this kinetic energy that’s built up around the tennis ball wants to go somewhere because science in the Physical Realm says there has to be some sort of energy transference, and nature will make that happen.

“And that’s why the tennis ball burst into flames. It was going about seventy kilometers an hour and weighs about sixty grams, so the amount of energy it produced when it was trying to go forward and backwards at the same time was—” Kerry pulled out his phone and looked at something on the screen. “1.2 times 10 to the eighth power ergs. I looked up an energy equivalent for that and it works out to the same amount of energy you would get instantly burning five liters of gasoline.” He pulled on his lower lip for a few seconds. “It’s also equivalent to the amount of energy released by detonating twenty-eight kilograms of TNT.”

 

Allow me to point out that I did my research and found that the weight of a tennis ball is indeed sixty grams, and an underhand lob can make a ball travel fifteen feet in a quarter of a second:  the actual velocity I calculated was 72 kph, which is only 45 mph.  And then I run it through a calculator and came up with the number that Kerry indicated.  A little more investigation proved that, yes, I had a shit load of kinetic energy going off in that room.  Which means if there had been the possibility of it all going off at once, it would have been bad–

 

 

He let everyone have a few moments to comprehend what he had just said. He knew what Annie’s reaction was going to be as she had been present when he was working out the Normal physics with Wednesday. But for everyone else this was something they hadn’t expected when they were told the week before they’d be working on time spells tonight.

It was Rivânia who finally broke the silence. “Holy hell, that would take out most of this part of the building.”

Nadine’s eyes widened as the shocked look on her face faded. “No shit, man. That would fucking kill us all.” She turned toward Wednesday. “That’s why we’ve got all the safety enchantments in place, isn’t it? They would’ve kept us from dying. Right?”

Wednesday nodded. “If there had been any chance of an explosion the safety enchantments would’ve thrown us all into stasis and automatically jaunted the source of the explosion into the quarry to the north of the Witch House. As it was, Kerry and I reviewed the possibility of an explosion before going ahead with this experiment and determined that the threat was minimal.” She turned to Kerry and nodded once in his direction. “You may continue.”

 

Now you know:  if there is anything like an explosion going off safety enchantments lock down time for every one–when you’re in stasis no time passes, so you can’t be hurt–and the explosion is sent to the north quarry, which is an old quarry from which marble was taken and is now full of water, which does well for containing explosions.  It’s also where the Green, Blue, and Red Lines pass and give those courses a name for their appropriate segments.

I imagine an explosion going off while people are racing by would add a touch of excitement.

So there’s the science I promised–but wait!  There’s More!  Really, there’s more.

‘Cause Kerry’s teaching and he has things to say…

How Super Was My Lab: Let’s All Look

And here you thought you were gonna get an author’s interview…

I spoke with the author last night and she decided that since she can’t actually start her Facebook giveaway until Friday, she wanted me to run the interview that morning.  Being the understanding person I am I said okay, so you’ll see that interview in a couple of days on 3 March.

In the meantime I arrived at work in my latest dress–

Gotta greet the new month in new hotness.

Gotta greet the new month in new hotness.

And I’m ready to take you into the superlab–

 

(The following excerpts from The Foundation Chronicles, Book Three: C For Continuing, copyright 2016, 2017 by Cassidy Frazee)

 

Annie had seen pictures of the super lab of being inside was another matter. She hadn’t realized it, but given the height of the ceiling she figured they were actually in the sub level and that the entire of the lab cut through into the lower level above. It wasn’t necessary to guess why the additional space was needed: pipes and HAVC conduits covered most of the ceiling.

She recognized at least a half-dozen chemical reactors, two condensers, two cookers, and in the far corner of the room three distillation columns. Her now trained eye saw that the system was set up for batch processing, there she spotted a couple of control panels which told her that it was possible the lab could be switched over for continuous processing if necessary. There were safety stations every ten meters and next to every station was an emergency vent button that could be used to clear the room of noxious and toxic fumes in seconds.

There were two powered exoskeletons stationed between the supply entrance and the personnel airlock which she guessed were used for moving around chemical containers inside the lab. To her right, about eight meters away, was a safety cage where the two hundred liter barrels of chemicals were stored, and off to her left was an open door that she assumed led to a locker room and a rest area.

 

There’s a lot of big words there and even bigger amounts of equipment:

Sort of like this without the witches.

Sort of like this without the witches.

But trust me, it’s put together in a way that’s gonna allow these kids to make a whole lot of mixtures that are designed to do good things for a body.  You might say they’re magical…

 

 

Annie was standing in an area which was unknown even to her parents. As they had once mentioned, they both took three years of Formulistic Magic before electing to move on to other studies in their D Levels. Her father specialized in classes revolving around magic as applied to mechanical technology in the Tesla Center, and her mother’s pharmaceutical research was performed at another location, as the school didn’t have a proper superlab when they were here nearly twenty years ago. One day when they came to visit she would make certain her parents saw this laboratory, for while it wasn’t in her nature to boast, she felt a certain pride in being the first Kirilovi to enter this room.

Erywin positioned herself in front of a large chemical reactor and clapped her hands. “Here we are: the Tesla Center chemical superlab. We will hold class here once a month and everyone in this class will be required to perform at least three assignments during this school year. As we have done over in the Chemistry Center you will work in pairs— though, as in the case with our F Levels, they will work together as the trio for now. When you are working on assignments in here they will be done at times when we would normally be holding lectures in the Chemistry Center—” Erywin turned slightly to her right and something caught her eye. “Kerry, what are you doing?”

Annie’s soul mate and climbed atop a rolling safety ladder and appeared to be looking over the contents of an open chemical reactor. He turned slowly back toward the rest of the class with a huge grin on his face as he shouted out his reply. “Yo, Gatorade me, bitch.”

 

Annie is fairly proud that by entering the lab she’s actually doing something that her parents didn’t do when they were students–though I’m gonna say the odds are good neither of her parents killed a couple of Deconstructors when they were students, so she’s got that on them, too.

But, you know, leave it to Kerry to just have to let his inner Heisenberg out and come up with a completely different idea of why they’re there.  And where does he get the idea to yell out the need for an electrolyte replenishing refreshment?  From here:

Yes, Kerry just has to go all Jessie Pinkman the first chance he gets.  Fortunately for him Erywin knows the source material and has a sense of humor:

 

Though Erywin rolled her eyes Annie noticed that she covered her mouth for a few seconds, probably to hide the smile on her face from the rest of the class. “Kerry.” She motioned at the boy. “Come down from there, please.” He stepped down from the safety letter an approach both Erywin and Annie, who were now standing close together. She lay a hand on Kerry’s shoulder. “If possible, can we have less of you pretending that this is something more than a chemical superlab? After all, if Isis suspects someone was here trying to cook meth, she’s going to become exceptionally upset.”

He shook his head slowly. “I won’t do that again.” He cast a quick glance to his left and gave Annie a wink.

As soon as the couple stepped back Erywin continued addressing the class. “As I was saying before being interrupted, this year you are required to perform three assignments. The objective of these assignments is to create a successful mixture in bulk. Most of what you’ll create will be of pharmaceutical grade purity, so it is not only important that you may be required to create three hundred liters of a particular mixture, but it will be necessary to ensure that the entire batch is equal to or greater than a specified purity.” She held up her right finger to emphasize the point. “If a small portion of the test sample falls several percentage points below purity, that means your entire mixture has fallen below a specific purity level and you will be required to either take a hit to your proficiencies for that assignment, or start over.

“The whole idea behind working in the superlab is to gain an understanding of what is required in these exceptionally large batch processes. Many of you will not go on to a future that involves Formulistic Magic, but it is necessary for you to gain an understanding of the protocols and procedures required for this sort of work were you to advance into the various chemical engineering fields.” She smiled as she looked around the room. “And for those of you will be moving up a level next year, you get to do it all again.”

Erywin let everyone down to the north end of the lab; it was not only the entrance to a personal break area, but along the wall were several work cubicles. “Each of you have an assigned workspace where you can keep track of your progress as well as use a computer terminal to look up information related to your assigned. You will use these cubicles as a team and they will remain yours throughout this level year.” She clapped her hands. “Find your cubical; the sooner you do, the sooner we can get to making magic.”

 

This is not an easy class and these are not going to be easy assignments.  Here a simply screw up could see a few hundred liters of mixture getting poured down the drain while your proficiencies take a massive hit–yeah, the superlab is no joke.  Not only does your magic gotta be on fleek, but being just a few steps off in your protocols will jack you hard.  But I’m certain Annie and Kerry will do okay–

But we are not finished with the lab.  Oh, not quiet yet–

How Super Was My Lab: All the Setup

Here we are once more and it’s superlab time.  As suspected, I didn’t in get much writing last night.  In fact, I didn’t get in any.  I suspect tonight’s going to be much the same way, though I can’t guarantee that.  I may get back to the house in time to get in than hour or so.  We’ll see.  It’s not like I’m working under some sort of deadline to get the stuff published.

Speaking of publish, tomorrow I’m actually going to run the interview that I did with an author friend last night.  I spent about seventy-five minutes interviewing her via PM over Facebook and all I need to do now is bookend the interview and set up some links and photos.  Then everybody can have a good time seeing how I do when it comes to interviewing one of our own kind.  And for anybody else would like an interview, just let me know: I’m ready with the gab time.

So now that we’ve got everything laid out to get to the lab, why don’t we actually get to the lab?  Hey, Cassidy, good idea!  Let’s do that:

 

(The following excerpts from The Foundation Chronicles, Book Three: C For Continuing, copyright 2016, 2017 by Cassidy Frazee)

 

The lobby of the Tesla Center but like the entryway to a large business: all that was missing was a security guard. The building itself was in the shape of a huge ‘T’, with the bottom of the stem facing northward towards the Instructors Residence. The lobby formed a semi-sphere nearly ten meters across. A single hallway ran down the center of the stem of the building where it met up cross hallway covering the top of the T. The hallway continued onward a few meters more to the back entrance which then led to The Hangar, were students worked on large-scale projects.

Erywin entered the building followed closely by Itsaso Ocampo, a Mórrígan student from Mexico. Seeing her made Annie once more realize that not only were Kerry and she the youngest students in class, but of the five other students three were F Levels ready to graduate at the end of this school year, and the other two were E Levels. By this time next year the class would be down to just four students unless Erywin began bringing in new people.

She looked around the lobby at her students and smiled. “Based on the eagerness I see on everyone’s face, I’m assuming you’re ready to get started.” She started walking or the hallway and motion for everyone to follow. “This way.”

They they stopped in the middle of the four-way intersection at the top of the T. Erywin pointed to two doors set into the west wall of the north-south hallway. “That door—” She indicated the door at the northwest corner of the intersection, one with a Class 10,000/ISO 7 placard set in the middle. “That’s the door for personnel entrances only. These double doors over here—” She indicated a set of doors said midway between the intersection and the south entrance of the building. “Lead to the service lift. Were going to take the lift today, but in the future unless you are taking supplies with you, use the main entrance.” She waved open the doors and stepped into the alcove leading to the service lift. Once everyone was comfortably inside with her she shut the door, raised the safety door and gate, and motion for everyone to join her on the left.

 

Believe it or not, that “Class 10,000/ISO 7” designation took about forty-five minutes of research to make certain I was getting it right.  You can go ahead and look that up on your own by doing a Google search on the information inside quotes on the previous sentence, or you can trust me.  If I were you I’d trust me.

What that designation means is that there are some clean room requirements in place for the Tesla superlab.  And that means there are certain type garments that have to be worn.  Not always, but when the processing begins the kids probably want to make certain that they’re not contaminating their batches. Otherwise, it’s twelve hours of work right down the shitter.  And nobody wants that.

And speaking of clean rooms, why don’t we find out about that?

 

The descent lower level only took about ten seconds and when they finally came to a stop Erywin once more raise the safety gate and door and motion for everyone to follow her. They found themselves in a large windowless gallery with the spiral staircase from the personal entrance set against the far north wall. Along the west wall to the left were several lockers which they knew contained clean suits and respirators. Along the east wall to the right were two sets of windowless doors: one large enough for people in the other a tracked door that raised into the wall above them. To the left of each door were lights, both of which were green.

“All right now, pay attention.” Erywin stepped to the center of the gallery and made certain that everyone paid attention to her. “As we’ve learned in other classes when these lights are green clean room conditions are not currently in effect. That means we can walk into the room now without having to wear safety gear. It also means both these doors can open without issues.

“When that light is red clean room conditions are in effect. It could also mean that there are contaminants present: in either instance, you will be required to put on safety garments before you can proceed into the superlab. On the other side of the personnel entrance is an airlock, and you will have to cycle through that airlock to enter the lab. Only two people can enter the airlock at a time, so keep that in mind. The supply door in front of the lift locks down when clean room conditions are in effect: you cannot enter through that door at all.

“Safety garments are also available inside the lab. That’s because during the time when you are preparing large mixtures it may become necessary for you to protect yourself from fumes and spillage. It’s the same reasoning we have for wearing lab coats, goggles, and gloves working in the normal lab: some of the things we deal with are dangerous enough on their own before you add a magical component. You all know this, so I shouldn’t have to worry about any of you violating protocol when working here.”

She pointed at the track door in a second later they began rising and locked into the open position after about ten seconds. Erwin strode past her students. “This is it, kids. Let’s go inside.”

 

Clean room conditions are important when you’re mixing up stuff, as I pointed out above.  It’s too bad that in the novel it’s the year 2013, because in two more years in real life some idiot over in England will talk about how lady scientist are a pain in the butt because they tend to cry, fall in love with their male colleagues, and are generally just too damn distractingly sexy when they’re in the lab.  This, of course, led to female scientists on Twitter doing an epic burn on this fool posting pictures of themselves working in the field all while being #DistractinglySexy:

I mean, when Annie dresses like this Kerry won't be able to keep his mind on the cook.

I mean, when Annie dresses like this Kerry won’t be able to keep his mind on the cook.

The kids at Salem won’t have to worry about this: they are there to get an education and would not find any of their partners, female or male, all that sexy while wearing clean room safety gear.  And if Annie and Kerry do manage a kiss now and then while waiting for their mixtures to complete, it’s not because they’re turned on by the side of themselves in full-body yellow suits and respirators. It’s because they’ve already found each other distractingly sexy–

Don't worry:  Erywin's already put up warnings at the lab.

Don’t worry: Erywin’s already put up warnings at the lab to cover all possibilities.

Don’t worry: we’re just about the see the inside of the lab and get on with this class.  Tomorrow will be a bit of a detour, what you want for 1 March?  I gotta come in like a lion, you know.

The Final Solo: Not One of Those

Finally–finally–I managed to break five hundred words in a sitting.  Given that I had finished churning out a recap that took longer than I imagined–honey, they all take longer than I imagine–and I was feeling the Brain Dead Blue creeping up on me something fierce, I got into the point because there was something that needed addressing.

Kerry admitted that he was a touch rattled on the flight out to Marker One, and it was because he didn’t like zipping along at high speed a couple of hundred meters above the sea.  This is the same kid who, a year and a half earlier, traveled on the same kind of broom at nearly the same speed, and did it a few meters above the ground with trees all around him, while also negotiating a couple of curves and another flier.  He wasn’t thinking about what he did then, and ever weekend he goes out and doesn’t think about doing the same thing, or that he’s crashed into the ground at speeds that, were he a Normal kid doing the same, he’d likely die.

Why is he a bit rattled?  Simple:

 

(All excerpts from The Foundation Chronicles, Book Two: B For Bewitching, copyright 2015, 2016 by Cassidy Frazee)

“It’s—” The rain and cold, misting air make Kerry’s blush all the more brighter. “It’s not that I’m traveling so close to the water at high speed, because, like you said, I’ve went that fact a couple of hundred meters over land. It’s that the land is so far below the surface. We go in the water and you don’t just lay there waiting for pickup—” He gulped. “You sink.”

“I understand perfectly.” Annie removed her right glove and let it hang by it’s attachment cord as she caressed his face. “Being a mountain girl, I’m not all that comfortable being on the water, either.” She looked down as she blushed. “I’ve never been on a boat. And other than the few excursions we’ve made over water while at school, this is the first time I’ve been out to sea.” Annie began chuckling “You do understand that flying at high speed a few hundred meters over the ocean is a psychological ploy, right?”

He nodded. “I kinda got that feeling. Everything they’re putting you through is designed to rattle you in some way.”

“The flying doesn’t bother me, but—” Annie quickly slipped on her glove. “The rain makes it feel colder.”

“It’s not just the rain.” Kerry clenched his arms tight around his torso. “The water temperature is like minus two Celsius, and it’s acting like a heat sink—at least that’s true here in the Gulf of Maine.” He pointed towards the mist in the east. “The Gulf Stream is way out there, so we don’t get all that warm southern water here.  It feels colder out here than it would over land because everything below us is colder.”

 

Kerry’s problem is pretty straight forward:  he has a small fear of drowning.  Crashing into the sea at high speed he could handle–it’s the sinking to the bottom that kinda freaks him out.  And here we learn something new as well:  Annie’s never been on a boat.  Planes, yes.  Brooms, for sure.  Flying free on her own:  she’s doing it now.  A boat?  Nope, not even once.  Which means at some point I gotta get these kids on a boat.  Cue The Lonely Island–

And Kerry is once again right:  the Gulf of Maine is cold, and that’s due to the influence of the Labrador Current bringing cold water down from Greenland and Northern Canada.  It sets up a barrier that prevents warming from the Gulf Stream, so the Gulf of Maine tends to remain cold though the majority of the year.

And with cold water comes all this sort of nasty looking stuff.

And with cold water comes all this sort of nasty looking stuff.

Yeah, that picture is a pretty good approximation of what they’re seen, though it’s just a bit nastier than that.  And they’re floating above it like it’s no big deal.  As Annie pointed out, keeping the kids out here is probably a psychological ploy of Vicky’s, and both kids know this.  So best to concentrate on each other and ignore the water below.

However, Annie does bring up something else:

 

Annie checked the collar of her parka, making certain it was secure. It was only after discussing the temperature of the water that she felt the chill. “This isn’t as bad what you went though back in December.”

“That whole flight—” He shook his head. “Oh, man: The Polar Express isn’t going to be easy. It’s going to be like a lot like this, only a little—”

“Worse?”

“Could be. I didn’t say anything, but during the debriefing the next day Vicky told us not to fly back like that again.” Kerry glanced around the featureless ocean. “She said if we tried a five hundred kph run back in temps like we hit coming back from Nova Scotia for more than a couple of hours we’d probably end up dead, and she didn’t want to go searching about Canada for our bodies.” He watched the waves slip by to the southeast, driven by the wind. “I don’t want to be one of those people.”

There was only one thing Annie could add to her soul mate’s statement. “I do not want you to be one of those people, either.”

Vicky’s voice broke thought their thoughts. “Salem Final Solo, this is Flight Deck. How you holding up? Over.”

Annie didn’t move away from Kerry as she gave the reply with a warm smile. “Flight Deck, this is Salem Final Solo. We are holding up just fine. Over.”

 

During the kid’s C Levels The Polar Express is going to become something of a deal.  Kerry will fly it, and Annie will deal with Kerry being out there in the arctic wilds of Canada almost alone for three days.  This is the first time he’s admitted it’s not going to be easy, and he’s saying aloud that he doesn’t want to do anything stupid that could get him killed.  Though it hasn’t happened in some time, students have died during The Polar Express–but then, we’ve already seen students die in the process of defending the school.  Shit does happen, even to my witches.  And they both know how dangerous said shit can get.

Kerry is not the only one who knows next school year can bring at least one nasty event.  Annie knows it, too, and she’s ready for some down time.  She does want to find an environment more conducive to, well, relaxing.

"This year he gets water, next year he gets snow. *sigh* When do we get Paris?"

“This year he gets water, next year he gets snow. *sigh* When do we get Paris?”

You’ll get it soon enough, young lady.

First you gotta get through the flight.