Flights of Imagination

After the long, somewhat sad post yesterday, I was ready for a change.  I went out and had my nails done–something I’d planed a few weeks back–because nothing makes me feel better than having my brows waxed and my nails painted, ’cause it makes me feel pretty.

I feel pretty, oh so pretty . . .

I feel pretty, oh so pretty . . .

And for those who might wonder, the polish is OPI Cajun Shrimp gel.  It’s a lovely color, and I may ask for a touch up when I go back in two weeks, ’cause it’s pretty hot.

At the moment I’m playing the Go-Go’s Vacation on something of a loop, because the song puts me in the right frame of mind and gets me going.  Also, it’s going to put in an appearance in a future Foundation novel–the D Level novel, if you must know.  Seriously, Vacation will be blasting out at some point in the lives of Annie and Kerry.  I’ll leave to you wonder where and why.

While Now, Voyager was playing in the background, I worked on B For Bewitching, and put Part Nine behind me.  Only two chapters, but it’s meaty, beaty, big, and bouncy, if I may steal from The Who.  It’s about flying:  Annie doing her final solo flight, and Kerry doing the last race of the season.  What?  You just now figured out those were real things?  Ha!  No, this is all happening, and from the layout of the story, it’s pretty much the focus of at least seven chapters.  Though I’m approaching Chapter Thirty, which leaves plenty of room for other shenanigans–a word Erywin will lay on the kids in an upcoming chapter.  I wonder what she’s talking about, as she doesn’t seem like the sort of person who’d use that word . . .

Here’s what I have for Part Nine:

It's so pretty, oh so pretty . . .

It’s so pretty, oh so pretty . . .

And Chapter Twenty-Seven has one of the longest title of any thing I’ve written, right up there with the title for Part Eight–and for the title of this novel, and the last, and the one to come.  Never mind.  The thing I like is that I’ve laid out this part, I know how it’ll flow, and I know the outcomes of both chapters.  I’ve also realized that Part Ten will be the last part of the novel, and there will probably be three or four, more than likely four, chapters in that part, which will bring the novel to a close.  And just as A For Advanced started and ended with Annie, B For Bewitching will start and end with Kerry, and the C Level novel will start and end with Annie.  Yes, I said C Level novel, ’cause I know you want to know.

Two things I figured out last night.  One, there are scenes that I need to add.  I should show something with the kids teaching each other what they’re learning in their special classes:  Kerry transformation magic, and Annie advanced sorcery.  I’m certain there will be other moments that need to pop up here and there as well, but I have the majority of the novel laid out, and it’s really all about the kids and their relationship, and how it’s building and growing.

And two . . . I’ve added up the scenes I have plotted into the novel, and at the moment there are one hundred and fifteen.  I’m figuring that it’s not going to be hard to do fifteen or twenty more, which will likely put me somewhere between one hundred and thirty-five to one hundred forty scenes.  Now, if I figure an average of fifteen hundred words per scene–and I have no reason to believe that average is out of the question based upon my last novel–then it’s just simple math to see if I go one hundred and thirty-five scenes, the estimated word count for the novel is around . . . two hundred thousand words.  I’m guessing it’s gonna be closer to a quarter million words, because I know some of these scenes are gonna run bigger that fifteen hundred words–

Didn’t I say at the start of this project I was worried this was going to be a short novel?  So much for that concern.

I think I’ll finish up the plotting in the next couple of days, but I don’t expect to start writing on this beast anytime soon.  By that I mean I’m not going to start on something new when I have so many other things to do.

Besides, I have to think on this story a bit more before decide what it’s going to say.

Out of Geekdom

Nothing about writing today, because I didn’t work on anything writing related last night.  It was a time to relax and recharge, and I’ll get into things a little tonight after I return from getting my nails done and grabbing something to eat.  No, I needed a nap and the need to sit and watch some TV last night, all the while thinking about something that’s been on my mind for a while.

It has to do with geekdom.  If you’ve followed the blog for a while you’ve seen some of my posts about my various steps into things geeky.  I’ve been into a lot of different things over the years, and I suppose I could say that I’ve tempered that love with a sense of reality, turning my love of various fandoms into a thing that I nurtured and cherished.

However . . . this year I’ve stepped into a “geeky gift exchange” that was limited to a small number of people, and since joining I’ve been going nuts.  No, really:  I’ve been really beating myself up the last couple of weeks over being in this group.  I should point out that I get like this with any gift exchange, because I’m fairly particular about giving gifts.  It’s not the value that I want someone to remember, but rather, I want them to have something that comes from my heart and speaks to them.

And then I begin reading what people in the group already own, what they’ve collected–and I began feeling bad.  Not for them, but rather, for me.

To paraphrase Karen Blixen, I had a collection in geeky things in my library in my home.  It wasn’t big, but it was growing, and it covered a lot of different things.

My first love had always been book–science fiction to be exact.  I was a space travel junkie, but there were a few other stories that I loved just as well, and in the 1960s and 70s I spent hours reading and trying to find stories relating to my favorite authors.  I collected Omni and Twilight Zone magazines, both sadly gone these days, and both of which offered fantastic stories and information while they were out.  I had nearly every issues of the first and all the issues produced during the Twilight Zone‘s short, two year run.  Twilight Zone was famous for first-run printings of Harlan Ellison’s Grail and Paladin of the Last Hour, among his best writing and my favorite stories, as well as Steven King’s The Jaunt and his now-famous review of The Evil Dead where Steven pretty much lost his shit and gushed out his love for the picture.

Then it was Doctor Who, which I started watching in PBS in Chicago about 1980.  Yes, twenty-five years before all the fans who today talk about how they’ve seen ALL THE EPISODES of the show, starting with Rose in 2005.  Uh, huh, sure you have.  I was fortunate to be able to watch the show on one of only two networks in North America that ran it at that time.  (The other network was a station in Toronto, Canada.)  After a while I began taping the show so I could go back and watch episodes when the mood struck, and when our local station finally managed to get access to the then full catalog of existing episodes (just under a hundred are missing, having been destroyed during various BBC vault purges), I was kept busy buying VHS tapes in bulk.

Then I asked for a scarf.

The Forth Doctor was my first Doctor, and he was known for, among other things, his long scarves.  My first wife, pregnant with our son, felt like she needed something to do, so she found a pattern for the multi-colored, eighteen foot scarf, and made it for me.  It was big and heavy, but it was also glorious.  I would actually wear it out and to work, and I didn’t mind the stares shot my way by people who wondered what in the hell I had wrapped around my body.

I few years later I wore that scarf to a huge convention where I met several of the actors, watched the first North American viewing of the Doctor Who episodes The War Games and The Caves of Androzani, and eventually had my picture taken standing alongside a full-sized Dalek that two guys had made in their auto body shop in high school.

This is not that Dalek:  back in my day Daleks didn't sport v-neck armor.

This is not that Dalek: back in my day Daleks didn’t sport v-neck armor.

I went to several DW cons over the next few years, cosplayed a few more times (we just called it “dressing up in costume” because we didn’t know what I was going to get labeled in the future), and met more actors.  At one con I managed to spend nearly forty minutes chatting with Colin Baker, the Sixth Doctor, and we just talked about things–not always about the show, but stuff about what it was like to act, what it was like to be in other shows, what it was like to live in England and have to hop a flight to Chicago where he’d find himself talking to people like me.  We did get to talking about his not being allowed to have a Regeneration Episode, and he had a . . . few . . . choice . . . words on that matter.  Still and all, Colin was an extremely nice guy and a lot of fun.

Again, not Colin, but I am digging the blond, Helena-like blond hair that I'd like for my own.

Again, not Colin, but I am digging the blond, Helena-like blond hair that I’d like for my own.

There were several other things I got into over the year.  Role Playing Games, of which I have dozens, and some of the games I ran during the 1990s were, in a way, legendary.  I collected Battletech miniatures, some of which are impossible to find.  I’d have people paint them and put them on display around the home.  During the period I was between my first and second marriages I began collecting anime:  some movies, some OVAs, a few wall scrolls, more than a couple of figurines that could only be bought in Japan–which, thanks to the Internet, was doable.  I also began collecting animation cells from various productions.  Of these I don’t have many:  maybe a dozen.  The majority are from the original Sailor Moon and Urusei Yatsura, with a couple coming from Song of Escaflowne and Silent Mobius.

All old school stuff, but as they are the original, hand-painted cells, they were and are worth a big of cash.  I know a couple ran about $200 in late 1990s money, and I believe the head shot I have of Lum set me back about $300.  The one I really wanted, the one I got into a bidding war with two other collectors, was for a full-body portrait of Sailor Saturn and her Silence Glaive, which was about as rare a cell as they came.  I stopped when my $850 bid was passed, and I later learned from the seller that the winning bid was $1,100.  Yeah, the things we did twenty years ago when we had money.

A figurine of what the cell would have sort of looked like.  Yeah, I just loved some World Destroying Firefly . . .

A figurine of what the cell would have sort of looked like. Yeah, I just loved some World Destroying Firefly . . .

So what happened to all this stuff?  Well . . .

You see, while I was happy in my geekdom, and wanted to continue adding to the collection, others close to me–otherwise known as First and Second Wives–had other ideas.  My first wife grew bored with my geekness–as she did with just about everything else pertaining to me–and began getting pissy with my collections and my interest.  When I got to where everything I did turned into a big argument, I stopped the pursuit of all things geek, though I didn’t actually curtail my gaming on the weekends.  It was during the time just after I moved out that I lost my Omni and Twilight Zone magazine collections:  my ex told me she sold them at a garage sale, but I’m more of a mind that she tossed them in the bin.  I later lost my Doctor Who VHS collection to my stepson, who my second wife allowed to make off with my boxes of tapes.  I was also “convinced” by my second wife to give him my scarf, because there wasn’t any need to keep it, right?

Some of the other things that happened during my current marriage has been the boxing of my figurines and the removal of my wall posters.  Some of them went to my daughter, but most of them have gone into garage storage.  I was told having them around the house looked–well, not good, right?  My Battletech miniatures are boxed up as well, since I was informed that it wouldn’t be a good thing to put them on display.  I never managed to frame my animation cells, either, and right now they’re sitting in my closet back in Indiana, still in their shipping sleeves.  I’m heading Back to Indiana in a week, and I promise to get a few photos of these and put them up for you to see.  One day my daughter will get them if she really wants them; if not, I’ll probably give them away to someone who’d love a pissed-off looking Sailor Mars about to fireball someone’s ass.

I really have no one to blame for my current geeky apathy other than myself.  Yes, I received little to no support in my pursuits, and in so many instances I felt as if I was working in a vacuum with my fandom, because the only one who felt an interest in these things was me.  Just like with my gaming–which I eventually stopped because I was told by someone that they didn’t understand why I gamed, and kept wanting me to scale back my weekend endeavors in that area–I agreed to curtail these activities, and ultimately I lost interest in the act of surrounding myself with things that reminded me of those interests I loved.

These days I keep my geekness to the area of intellectual endeavor, because I can always look something up and memorize facts and use that knowledge to kinda keep me warm a cozy.  It’s not always comforting, however:  it’s like the difference between having a sweater that keeps the chill away, and curling up under a comforter with someone you love who’s going to whisper in your ear, “I’d blow up a star to be able to speak to you one last time.”  No, not nearly the same.

Which is why I see what others I know have and love, and brings on the tears because it reminds me of what I once had–

And what, over the decades, I’ve lost because I didn’t want to upset people who didn’t support me.

Hey, it’s never too late to turn that around, is it?

The Mounting A’s

First off, Happy Ostara, which is today, the first day of spring.  Also, happy Eclipse Day for everyone I know in Europe.  Really kind of an auspicious day, and in another reality, certain kids parents would experience the eclipse while they prepared for a talent show that would happen tomorrow.  Yep, that little festival goes off tomorrow night, but we all know there isn’t a real school hiding somewhere on Cape Ann–right?

In fact, Ostara was covered in my plot out last night.  Another five chapters were figured and plotted, and they are in the Scrivener mix, with help from a semi-adjusted time line in Aeon Timeline.  Let’s look at what I have.

First, Chapters Twenty-Two and Twenty-Three, finishing up Part Seven.

Over the Mountains and Into Spring . . .

Over the Mountains and Into Spring . . .

For a while I spent time going over the race course in detail, and I’ll probably go through this weekend and lay out the area with a little detail given as I go along.  One of the thing about race courses is that everyone has names for certain stretches, so I need to find some good maps of the area and look at what the features are called in real life, and then adjust.  What I can image is some flying through and above the woods all the while climbing and diving up and down mountain sides, with at least one section of the course flying three hundred meters over a lake.

Believe it or not, Chapter Twenty-Three is about racing as well, and Helter Skelter is a pretty good metaphor about a section of the course where Kerry will race.  This time there won’t be much said about the performance itself, though you will discover what he plays.  You will even hear about some of Annie’s art, some of which will come into play later in the story.

Now that we have that out of the way, let’s get to Part Eight, and Chapters Twenty-Four through Twenty-Six.

Pretty much what you'd expect from someone who is showing and not telling.

Pretty much what you’d expect from someone who is showing and not telling.

One Part, three chapters, twelve parts, that’s all, folks.  If you check the time line you’ll see that everything happens over the course of twenty-four hours, making this another kinda Day of the Dead, only there’s no attack, no real one at least.  But this is the most important part of my story so far in my universe, because as they used to say on Torchwood, this is where everything changes.  I mean that, too.  You don’t know how much I mean that . . .

The funny thing is, looking at how I have this part laid out, it’s bookended by Annie, who starts out the action by pretty much raising hell, and end it with a whole lot of comforting.  Maybe I should head-up every scene in a 24 motif:  “The following crazy-ass stuff happened between one and two AM . . .”  Yep, could totally get away with that–though there isn’t a lot of crazy-ass stuff going on, just a little.  And, at the end of Chapter Twenty-Five and the beginning of Chapter Twenty-Six, you get to meet someone you’ve heard a lot about but haven’t actually met . . .

In the last novel Part Eight was where Annie and Kerry split up for Yule and a certain ginger girl macked on Kerry.  Now, in this story, school is just two months from getting out, and while it appears that Annie and Kerry aren’t going out to work with the Guardians, there’s gonna be a whole lot of other tension building from this point on–

You’ll just have to wait and see what I mean.

Two to Three in Five

For the first time in three week I ventured out to Panera on a Wednesday night, because I’m over my funk–well, a bit, anyway–and I needed to get out and do something.  That “something”, of course, being writing, or whatever comes close to that.  Since I’d edited about five thousand words the night before, I figured it was time to get back into B For Bewitching and start laying out a chapter or two–

Or maybe more?

By the time I was done I’d finished up one act and started another, and did something else that’s just as important to the story.  So . . . wanna see?  Of course you do:  that’s why you’re here.

First off, let’s start with the end of Act Two:

As advertised, it is surely the end.

As advertised, it is surely the end.

Three chapters, eleven scenes, though at least two of those scenes will have sub-scenes once I get into the writing of them.  I may add those before I start writing, I may wait until the words flow, but I’m certain they’ll appear.  By a rough count there is at least twenty-five thousand words that go go into just three three chapters, though who really knows, right?  Really, I’m gonna work hard to keep it under two hundred thousand words this time, I promise.

It might not look like it, but there are a couple of classroom scenes here, and Time For Death may be the most telling.  Guess what, kids?  Time for the Mistress of All Things Dark to start showing you why you’re in Sorcery.  In fact, Helena’s first words to the class will be, “Today I’m going to show you how to kill someone.”  Unspeakable Curses, my ass:  she’s gonna lay it all out for her students, and she’ll even have a way of showing the class how it’s done–alone with a couple of current students who’ve had a bit of experience in the field showing off their stuff.  No extra points for guess their names . . .

As Seen in Cardiff is being deliberately vague, because I like vague.  I was called a tease yesterday, and yep, I am.  There is a lot happening in this novel that’s a direct tease:  in fact, I don’t even get into something truly important in the life of my kids until Chapter Seventeen, and that will get jerked around until a ways into Act Three.

Speaking of which . . .

Not as nice or neat, but I'm getting there.

Not as nice or neat, but it’s getting there.

First off, ignore anything from Chapter Twenty-Two on down.  I imported A For Advanced so I could use that layout for this novel, and that’s why you see total word counts on some of these chapters.  Once I get down there and start adding things, those counts will vanish.

Chapter Twenty is a big setup for something to come.  It’s also the second time in the story we get to see our Favorite French Headmistress, who finally gets a scene of her own.  Don’t worry, Mathilde will show up a few more times in the novel, but unlike the first novel, she isn’t seen as much here.  Why?  Because she’s not a big part of this story.  The next novel, however . . .

Chapter Twenty-One, Night Flight, is already shaping up to be one of those chapters I’m really looking forward to writing, and in here is a scene that, if I can write it out as I see it in my head, is going to become one of my favorites.  Really, I want to start writing this now, but I can’t because . . . stuff.  And things . . .

Then there’s Chapter Twenty-Two, Mount Katahdin, and I haven’t laid that out yet, but it’s likely I will tonight.  Remember I once mentioned that there is a huge cross country race, three hundred kilometers in length, held every year around this location?  This is it:  this is the race.  And since I’ve already laid out a few hints about someone’s involvement in racing, you can probably figure out what’s going to happen.  This is going to be one of the most difficult chapters for me to write, because I want it to be exciting without being boring, and that’s not always easy to do.

Lastly I did this:

I have a list of names--

I have a list of names–

Long ago, back in October of 2013, I figured out all my A Levels attending the 2011/2012 Salem school year.  I not only figured out their names, but where they were from, and the coven into which they were placed.  Well, if I’m going to go forward with the novel, there has to be some attrition, and it was Triage Time last night.  Alica was already a given:  she vanished after the first night at school.  Everyone else who is italicized and has a big “(A)” after their coven name is also gone, and a close examination shows that fifty percent of Ms. Rutherford’s 2011 London Collection is no longer attending Salem.  A sad state of affairs, but Maddie did tell everyone the first day of class that by the time graduation rolls around, about half the people in the room will be gone.  Looks like it’s headed that way.

There you have it:  more fun, more madness, more happiness and sorrow.  And the best is yet to come.

It’s shaping up to be an interesting school year.

Admiring the Prior Creation

There was a moment during last night’s editing of Kolor Ijo that had me going, “Hum, really?  I did that?”  And it had nothing to do with clumsy sentence structure, of which a few I discovered during the night.  It had to do with discovering that I’d actually done a great job setting up a mystery–

Allow me to explain.

First off, I’m not good with riddles and mysteries.  Riddles have always set up a mind block in me of some kind, and I usually have no idea what they are, or mean.  I mean, there’s often no point of reference for them, so unless you’re Edward E. Nigma, they seem difficult, if not impossible, to solve.

And mysteries are never good with me.  I can usually see the solution coming a mile a way, or I’m spending too much time trying to figure out how the particular conclusion was reached an I remained puzzled.  This is one of the reasons I don’t mind spoilers in a book, show, or movie, because a lot of time I’m watching how someone–the writer and director in most cases–got from A to Z without tripping over their own feet.  I’ll usually have to go back and reread or watch something to determine if I enjoyed what I’d seen, or if I’d realized that what was before me made no sense.  (I had that happen with a recent re-watching of the movie, The Avengers.  Didn’t make much sense on the second time around.)

But what I’d done in Kolor Ijo was set up a mystery.  I had to, because the events that lead to Part Three are all dependent on things that happen twenty years before, and as I was going through the story last night, I could remember how I’d spent time sinking down into the story and looking up some history on Indonesia to be able to get to that particular point in the novel.  And after I did so, I felt pretty pleased with myself.

I didn't look quite as happy as this, but I was almost there.

I didn’t look quite as happy as this, but I was almost there.

Last night wasn’t the best of nights, what with crying and my toilet deciding it was going to spray water around my bathroom with a little help from me–that last part is true, don’t ask.  But while I was in my little editing zone, I felt a confident and, yes, pleasure, that all those years ago–well, almost three–I was able to set up a background event that, in the long term, made sense.  And I remember now that this story was one of the reasons I started looking into time line software, because I was probably thinking at the time, “This would be a lot easier to lay out if I could actually see what happened in the past.”

That’s carried into today, because I’m setting up little hints and clues to future events in my current set of novels.  Or, if not that, I’m throwing things out there that may seem like I’m just blowing them off, but that will be resolved somewhere down the line.  Maybe in few chapters, maybe in a few novels.

Believe me, though:  I will get back to them, because I know they are there.

Imagining Through the Holidays

I’m at a difficult point for laying out this story, because I feel like I want to terminate what I’m working on now for Act Two and back load four or five parts into Act Three.  Which would be strange because Acts One and Two have consisted of three parts each, and I don’t want to make it feel as if Act Three is so much bigger than the others.

However, this is just planning, not the actual novel.  I have to keep reminding myself that I did some major chances to A For Advanced after I started writing, including introducing the Three Act Structure, and moving/adding/removing parts, chapters, and scenes around as I went.  I think I was several months into writing the first novel before I was confident I had it as I wanted it, and even then, most of the Kansas City chapter was modified not more than a few days before I started writing.

What do I have as of last night?  This:

More of the same, only different.

More of the same, only different.

Chapters Fifteen and Sixteen are all about the holidays, and they could expand as I think about those times more.  Chapter Fifteen is all about the kids being home, which we already know they are because of the preceding chapter.  As I have it now, there are two discussions between the kids and their mothers, and then . . . well, it would seem that I may have the kids getting together in their dreams.

I was going over the “discussions” between Annie and Kerry and their mothers, and I came up with a sort of dynamic between them.  It would seem that Annie’s mom has reasons up her sleeve for why she does some of the things she does with her daughter, and Kerry’s mom–well, that one is a little trickier to work out, because, deep down, I feel Kerry’s mom isn’t really conscious of why she does some of the stuff she does to her son, she just does them.  The thing is, I know why she has such a conflict with Kerry, and I can’t talk about it in this novel–or even the next.  It’s something that won’t come out until Kerry’s ready for his D Levels, at which point it should make sense.  Should.

Then they come back, and Goodnight Vienna is something of a trick for me, because Kerry returns to Salem with Annie, and there is a possibility that Annie’s father will be there to see her off.  Which means–does he get to finally meet the Boy of His Daughter’s Dreams?  Or do I save that?  I’m in a bit of a conflict here, and letting them meet sets up a scene much latter in life–not this book, nope, sorry, but in another–that would really press home something that Papa suspects.

And then something happens, because you don’t have a scene titled Telling Annie unless there was something to tell.  I worked that scene out last night, and it hurts, it really does.  Not for the reasons you may think, but . . . it does.  Gotta go with me on this one.

Now to decide what to do tonight, because I’m way behind on my editing . . .

The Trip Through Part Four

I spent a lot of time going over the novel yesterday, between bouts of being hungry and feeling like I was going to loose my lunch.  Couldn’t figure out if I was coming down with a cold again, or if it was something I ate, but for most of the afternoon I felt queasy and ended up sleeping in front of the TV for about an hour.

But in the process I put three chapters out of the way in Part Four, and . . . I’ll get to that in a bit.

Here is what I have:

It's shapping up quite nicely.

It’s shaping up quite nicely.

There’s a lot there, but then again, there isn’t.  This covers maybe four, possibly five, events in the story, it seems like there isn’t a lot going on there.  Until I start thinking that with all those scenes, each probably being between fifteen hundred and two thousand words each, there’s twenty to twenty-five thousand words in those chapters.  Which means if I’m worrying about the novel being short, I shouldn’t worry.

But there are private matters here.  I talk about dancing and racing, fighting and injury, dreaming and looking for connections.  What about school work?  Bah.  This isn’t about being in the class, though that will come up–I’ve got something after the start of the year for sorcery class, it’s just a matter of knowing when it’s going to happen.  Which I’ll have in my time line sometime tonight.

Here it’s all about the relationship, and some of the things related to the school.  School work is work, and I want to avoid getting bogged down in that here.  It was a bit necessary in the first novel, because it helped to introduce the instructors, and give people an idea about how the classes work.  But now that people have that information, there’s isn’t a need to go into it once again.  You know the players, and you know how things are gonna go.  It’s a matter of moving the relationship along.

Which brings me to another item:  the holidays.  And . . .

Did you think I'd forget this?

Did you think I’d forget this?

I managed to get into the next part and the next chapter, and it deals with the kids heading home for the holidays.  And if you look at my synopses metadata, you can figure out that Annie and Kerry leave the school and head to Vienna together, then split up and head for their own homes.  A big change of pace from last year, which means that Kerry won’t have to hang out all day in the Great Hall and be placed in a position where he’ll have to curse someone again.  Last year Annie’s mother jaunted into Vienna to pick up her daughter–is Dad gonna be there this time as well?

It goes without saying that Chapter Fifteen will deal with the kids at home.  It won’t be a long chapter, but you’ll see a dynamic between the kids and their moms.  Yes, there will be a conversation between Kerry and his mom, and you’ll discover something interesting about her–and Annie will find out that her mom is working hard on something with her as well.  Curiouser and curiouser, as the saying goes.