Leaving it All Behind Once Again: Looking Back at Logan

To paraphrase Carnac the Magnificent, I have before me the final chapter.  And I have added words to the first of four final scenes.  Yes, folks, the end is almost here.

Not quite yet, but it's coming.

Not quite yet, but it’s coming.

Last night I didn’t get into any writing, though I did play with Aeon Timeline a lot, and played with imaging the sky at different location around the world at different times, because it’s fun.  Also, I discovered I not only have a way to burn my old CDs to a digital format on my computer and listen to them while I work, but I have found a few of my old albums as well online for less than I paid for them originally–after you adjust for inflation, naturally–and this could see me buying some of the music I used to list to all the time. getting it down on my PC, and rocking out as I work.

As you can see.

As you can see I’m doing right now.

So everything in this chapter happens during the day of 1 June, 2013.  Just as with the last novel there’s a lot of goodbyes being said, and there’ll be a lot of sleeping as well, since my kids will be adjusting off Eastern Daylight Time to whatever time zones they live in at home in Europe.  And as I promised I moved the location of the first scene, which I originally planed as happening at breakfast at the Sea Sprite Inn, to the present location.  And where is that?  Why, it’s . . .

 

The following excerpts from The Foundation Chronicles, Book Two: B For Bewitching, copyright 2015, 2016 by Cassidy Frazee)

Terminal E at Logan International Airport was far brighter than Annie anticipated, though the crowd this early on a Saturday morning met her expectations, particularly given the small size of the international terminal.

It was close to six-thirty, and Kerry and she had already been up nearly two hours. They were up, changed and repacked, then down to the Sea Sprite Inn’s dining area for a five-thirty breakfast. At six-ten they finished breakfast and Helena, Erywin, Deanna, and them jaunted directly to a safe spot in Terminal B before making their way to their present location. Trevor didn’t met them for breakfast, nor did he stay with them: he was with the rest of the B and A Levels in downtown Boston, and met them at the airport before heading off to help with departure protocols.

Just like last year everyone looked a bit tired, as if none of the returning European, African, and Western Asia student slept much. Their fellow B Levels also appeared slightly on edge, and given how Kerry had begun taking on an air of dread during breakfast, Annie guessed that nearly some twelve hours from now.

Kerry stood silently at her side; she saw his eyes were locked upon the doorway of their departure gate, E7B, and the Airbus A330-300—an aircraft they’d never flown—visible beyond the window. Annie gently touched his left hand. “My love?”

 

These kids are hitting a lot of airports this novel, and here is the third one, Logan International Airport in Boston, which was not named after an old Canadian mutant with a bad attitude.  And the scene is currently taking place in Terminal E, the airport’s international terminal.

Nary a mutant in sight, just a lot of young witches waiting to go home.

Nary a mutant in sight, just a lot of young witches waiting to go home.

 

The departure gate, E7B, is actually the one at the lower center portion of the image above, the one with the aircraft hooked up to the boarding ramp.  One could almost imagine that’s the flight The Foundation has ready to take all the Salem A and B Levels home, and who’s to say it isn’t?  Well, probably me for one, but it’s nice to dream.

Kerry’s nervous, and who can blame him?  However, there’s a certain witch who’d like him to not be nervous, and her soul mate knows not to answer when she calls–

 

He turned his attention away from the gate. “Yes, Sweetie?”

“Do you remember what Erywin told you at breakfast?”

He looked at the floor as he sighed, but when he looked up there was a smile on his face, as if he knew he Annie wasn’t trying to mean. “She said that since I have no idea how my parent are going to react, or what they’re going to say, until I tell them I’m a witch, there’s little point in getting worked up over what could happen.” He turned to her. “Because right now no one knows what’s going to happen.” He glanced over Annie’s shoulder. “Except maybe Deanna.”

“Except maybe her.” Annie held both his hands in hers. “You’re not going to come out to your parent for another ten hours. Instead of worrying about what may happen, let’s concentrate on our time together and what will happen.”

His mouth formed something between a smile and a smirk. “I know, I’m being bad.” He kissed her quickly upon the lips. “I’m not going to ruin this day for you.”

“Thank you, my love.” She kissed him back. “Just remember, after I leave you in Berlin I’m going to worry about what happens in my own way.” She gave him her best smiling smirk in return. “I have to sit there at dinner with my parents and pretend I’m not concerned that your parents are being mean to you.”

“That’s a concern of mine as well.” He laughed as he kissed one of her hands. “I love you so much; even when you’re not there for me physically, you’re still there for me.”

She slightly bowed her head. “Of course I am: I’m you wife, and that’s what a good wife does for her husband.”

“Particularly the witchy wives.”

“Especially those—”

Their joie de vivre was interrupted by a girl’s voice from their right. “Hi.”

 

It appears those Public Displays of Affection are not confined to the school grounds, and no one is safe from these two letting their romance flow.  And they are publicly calling each other husband and wife, and outside of school as well, which means it’s likely just a matter of time before that blows up in their face and their schoolmates start giving them the crazy eye the first time they do this at school.  Unless there are students doing this in the terminal now, which would be funny as hell when you think about that happening.

But who is this girl interrupting them?  Hummm, Girl Interrupting.  That could almost be a movie title, one that had film locations not far from where I’m sitting right now.  You’ll find out who this mystery girl is tomorrow, for I have no recaps to make note for tonight, which means I can maybe finish this scene, or at least make a dent in it.

Just like my witches, every moment brings me closer to the end . . .

The Day Before the End: Goodbye Once More

It’s rare that I go through an emotional roller coaster like I did last night, but it still happens.  Probably because I’m due for my shot tonight, and when I get to that point it’s hard to keep from getting emotional.  Throw into that mix a collection of songs that are going to have meaning in the upcoming stories, and I was ripe for the waterworks.

This all falls along the backdrop of everyone going home for the summer.  The school is shutting down, the last classes were the day before, and some of the students returning to Asia and Oceania departed from Boston some nine to ten hours earlier.  The novel is currently skirting three hundred and twenty thousand words, and it was only about three hundred thousand ago that my kids were meeting in a hotel in Berlin, unaware that they were going to meet up with a couple of girls who were going help them establish ties that would remain throughout the school year.

So much has gone down–

Writing looks easy, but believe me, being in a public places allows you to drown out all other distractions. Um, yeah.

How did I ever manage to get this far?

Pretty much by sitting down and writing nearly every night, that’s how.  And in a few more weeks you can take a rest.  Until then–the goodbyes begin:

 

This excerpt from The Foundation Chronicles, Book Two: B For Bewitching, copyright 2015, 2016 by Cassidy Frazee)

The moment his computer shut down Kerry lifted it from its stand and slipped it into his backpack next to the portable keyboard and mouse. He turned his attention to his room while zip his pack closed, giving the place he’d spent most of the last nine months a final view.

His uniforms and shoes were inside his wardrobe, along with the few toiletries that he’d need when he return at the end of August. His bed was neatly made with the pillows set atop the comforter. The two framed works of art—the works that Annie gave him after each of the last two Ostaras—still hung upon the wall, but were marked with a note indication they were to be moved with the other things that were headed for the room where he’d spend his C Levels next school year.

He felt tears welling in his eyes as he looked about the room. I learned so much about myself this year—and about Annie as well. In a way he couldn’t believe he’d never set foot in this room again, but as always he’d wander back through his memories and remember the parting words of The Phoenix as he left his E and A: It’s okay to remember the past, but you can’t keep dwelling upon those moments. You have to keep writing new chapters.

 

Right there, those last lines from The Phoenix . . . I knew I was going to use them the moment I started writing this scene, because the one think Kerry has learned by coming to Salem is that his life is a story, and that’s something that resonates with him because, whether he’s aware of it of not, the summer of year before he started his A Levels, during a time when he knew the dreams he had of a certain Chestnut Girl were more than just dreams, and that there was something incredibly special about her, he heard one particular line in one particular TV show:

 

“Well, you’ll remember me a little. I’ll be a story in your head. But that’s OK: we’re all stories, in the end. Just make it a good one, eh?”  Doctor Who, The Big Bang.

 

Maybe subconsciously, like Kerry, I thought about that above line when I wrote it, but I can assure you there wasn’t a conscious connection when Kerry’s E and A was written in November, 2013.  It’s really one that I believe defines him these days, because it seems like he, as well as Annie, are constantly opening new chapters to their lives every day.

The thing is, when I brought brought up A For Advanced so I could copy and paste The Phoenix’s words, I started reading that part, the end of Kerry’s E and A, and I started crying like crazy.  I can’t say why, but I totally lost it.  I eventually resumed writing, but I needed about twenty minutes for the feeling to pass.  It was hard, trust me.  And I’m still surprised that going back into something I wrote three years ago can affect me so–

A lot like this, only worse. But I'm better now . . .

How is it I get this way reading my own stuff?

It’s a good think Kerry isn’t alone on the second floor, or he might be in his room crying for a while . . .

 

 

He allowed himself about fifteen seconds for a good cry before retrieving one of the towels in the hamper so he could wipe his face. “You were good to me—” He smiled as he looked about the room. “Be good to the next guy, ‘kay?”

There was a knock at the door. He finished wiping his face and tossed the towel back in the hamper before half turning to answer. “Come in.”

The door opened and Jario filled the entrance. “You about done?” He nodded to his left. “’Cause there’s someone out here who’s eager to see you.”

Kerry chuckled. “Can’t imagine who.” He hooked his backpack over his right shoulder. “Let’s not keep the girls waiting.”

Annie, Penny, and Alex were standing in the open area near the stairs talking. There were dressed the most relaxed either Kerry or Jario had seen them since the start of school. Alex wore a blue v-neck tee shirt and black capri leggings with sandals; Penny wore a yellow tank top and gray shorts with blue plimsolls; and Annie wore a light green floral print blouse with a black skater skirt and her favorite pair of brown gladiator sandals. Given that in the last week the temperatures had finally become seasonal—it was twenty-nine Celsius outside at nine hours, and was expected to top thirty-three C by late afternoon—the girls were dress for relaxed comfort.

All three looked in the boys direction as they entered the open space. “About time you show up, Kerry.” Penny laid her hand upon Annie’s shoulder. “Someone was about to see if they could break into your room and get you.”

“And she would have, too.” Kerry wrapped an arm around Annie’s shoulder and gave her a kiss. “Sorry. I just had to say goodbye.”

“I completely understand.” Annie kissed him back. “I hope it was a good farewell.”

“It was.”

“So was mine.”

“Um, hum.” Kahoku entered the second floor from the stair landing. He was attired just as comfortably as everyone else, wearing a white tee shirt, brown slacks, and black flip flops. “Don’t you guys ever get tired of these PDAs?”

Kerry exchanged a glance with Annie before answering. “Never.”

“Didn’t think so.” He moved in behind Alex. “Just so you know, you’re making it so the girls want more affection in public—”

“And there’s a problem with that?” Alex spun around in his arm. “Better watch out, or you might find there being fewer good night kisses next year.”

Kahoku looked sufficiently chagrined. “Consider it watched.”

 

The Return of the Dreaded Public Display of Affection!  And, it seems, some of the kids haven’t gotten used to them yet.  This is also the first time we’re seeing the boys in this little group of friends feeling the heat to also go PDA with their BGE, and Alex seems to be down in the “I want MORE” column for those affections, and has put her boyfriend on notice.  Hum . . . must be an Eastern European Girl thing.

Looks like everyone’s about to go their separate ways–but not before a short discussion . . .

Where In the World Is Yule Going?

In my novel the year 2011 is winding down, and people are leaving the school.  Yes, it’s true that there are people of all faiths attending my fictional location, but given that was it originally founded by a bunch of European witches in the late 1600, and that the school still celebrates the old holidays as were once celebrated centuries before, there’s little reason why they wouldn’t clear out the school for a couple of weeks to allow people some time with their families, and to pretty much keep the Åsgårdsreia kids from scaring the crap out of everyone by reenacting the Wild Hunt.

Annie’s leaving:  so is Kerry, though not at the same time.  Annie’s heading back to Bulgaria, and Kerry’s heading to California.  Just like in the days when they “met”, right?  Because of the time zones, Annie’s leaving out about nine AM, and Kerry–well, he’s going to be around most of the day, actually.  You’ll find out more about that in the next scene.

Right now, however, it’s all about getting Annie to the station on time–the teleport station, that is.  The one the school has stashed away for things like the beginning and end of the school year, and the mid-year holiday.

And how is our couple handing this departure?

 

All excerpts, this page, from The Foundation Chronicles, Book One: A For Advanced, copyright 2013, 2014, by Cassidy Frazee)

Kerry waited in the corridor outside Annie’s room. He’d been there for about twenty minutes, and while he could have waited in the mezzanine commons, he thought it best to stay close to her door.

He didn’t want to miss a moment of walking her to the jaunt platform.

Annie finally emerged. She’d changed her top so she was wearing a dark sweater with a full collar, with her locket positioned outside in full view. She was still wearing her dark tan skirt and black leggings, but had changed out her flats for warmer, thicker, tan boots. She had a brown weekender bag slung over her shoulder, which she set to the floor as she turned to shut her door.

Kerry was on the bag in a moment. “I can carry that.”

“It’s okay: I have it.” Annie lifted it to her shoulder with ease. “There’s not a lot in it; most everything else is already being sent to the jaunt room.” She held out her right hand and Kerry immediately took it before they started walking towards the stairs.

 

Annie laid the same move on Kerry that she laid on her father before leaving for school, and almost a year ago, back when I started writing this novel.  She doesn’t want anyone carrying her bags for her.

And where is everyone at this very moment?

 

Students had been leaving the school for the start of the nearly two-and-a-half-week Yule holiday since late last night and early this morning. Unlike the start and finish of the school year, and A and B Levels were being jaunted to various staging locations around the world with their fellow upper levelmates. While Annie wouldn’t need documentation to explain how she arrived at her destination, Kerry knew once he arrived somewhere in San Francisco, he’d be given tickets and boarding passes to prove he’d taken a non-stop United flight from Logan to San Francisco International, and that he’d return to Boston on the second of January.

Cernunnos Tower was mostly cleared out, even now before nine AM. The East and Central Asian and Oceanic students had already departed, and the Western Asian, European, and African students were in the process of departing now, with some of the South American students departing after them. Except for those students living in Alaska or Hawaii, most North American students wouldn’t leave until late in the afternoon–or as in Kerry’s case, not until late tonight.

 

Because The Foundation has to snow the parents of those A and B Level kids, because they don’t know what sort of witchcraft their little love goblins are up to yet.  Hence the gaslighting being referenced, to make Kerry’s parent think he just spent several hours going to Logan International, and then sat on a flight sailing across country to his final destination.

But that’s for later:  Annie’s talking now.

 

“Both your parents are coming?” Kerry had asked the same question last night, but he was trying to keep his mind off her departure by making small talk.

“Yes.” Annie looked straight ahead as Kerry held first the inner tower door and then the other tower door. She continued staring straight down the covered walk as they strolled through the bright light and brisk morning air. “I wasn’t sure if Papa was coming, but Mama said there wasn’t any way he was staying home.” She finally turned and gave Kerry a smile. “Sometimes it seems like I have a difficult time with my parents, but I do miss them—it’ll be good to see them again.”

“Yeah, I can imagine.”

Annie didn’t want to dwell on her family holiday versus his. In the last five weeks Kerry had received two emails from him family: one confirming that he was coming to his grandparents home outside San Fransisco for Christmas, and the last one this past Tuesday requesting flight information. “You’ll have a nice time visiting with your grandparents; concentrate on that.”

He nodded and squeeze her hand. “I will. You going straight home after that?”

“Yes. We’ll jaunt home, then I’ll take my adjustment medication, sleep for three or four hours, and when I wake up we’ll go into town for dinner. By the time we get back it should be around midnight, and I’ll be ready for bed for real.”

 

Yep, teleportation, jaunting, whatever you want to call it:  it’s the only way to travel.

"You guys are flying back to Europe?  You're adorable."

“You guys are flying back to Europe? You’re adorable.”

But there’s a bit more to this story than just getting Annie in a room and sending her home.

You’ll just have to wait for it.