To There and Back Again

For once I was recharged and ready to go yesterday.  I mean, I was tired after work, but only because it was as long, boring day, and I wanted to get home bad.  But there were things to do:  a paper to edit (okay, I wasn’t really into that one), a novel to write, and a intro to the television reviews I’m going to do.  I got in there and did them.  Did them hard.  Got the paper out of the way, wrote up almost nine hundred words on my intro, then turned around and added another six hundred and sixty four words to the novel.  Really, I tried making it to sixty-six, but it didn’t happen.  Maybe next time.

Another goal was reached as well:  seventy thousand words passed.  And this time in twelve days instead of fifteen.  I had to make up for lost time, right?

It only seems like six weeks ago this had just become a novel.

It only seems like six weeks ago this had just become a novel.

The rate at which I’m working leads me to believe I’ll finish Act One in a couple of weeks–probably during the time when I’m back home in Indiana.  If this is true, then the first act will end up somewhere between eighty and eighty-five thousand words, and the other two acts, if the same size, will pull the novel in at a quarter of a million words.  Though that can change, because I believe Act Three might just end up a little bigger than the others.

Doesn’t matter.  At least I can release this book as one book, and not as a multi-volume encyclopedia.  It’s easier to read that way.

And what about those six hundred words?  Well, they’re right down here, and it’s a bit of a continuation for Annie . . .

 

(All excerpts from The Foundation Chronicles, Book Two: B For Bewitching, copyright 2015 by Cassidy Frazee)

Annie remembered the first time Kerry and she walked into the Dining Hall with their flight gear on and their brooms in hand—the first Saturday after the first week of classes. She’d visited Deanna in Memory’s End while Kerry was with Vicky getting checked out on an Espinoza. He later met her as she was walking back to The Pentagram and convinced her to fly around the school grounds with him.

Mid-way through their day they buzzed the Great Hall, landed in the garden, and went inside for lunch. Though Kerry didn’t seem to notice, Annie was keenly aware that at least a third of the students in the hall watched them as they walked to their then always-reserved table, set down their brooms, then unzipped their flight jackets as they sat and waited to order.

Since then they’d done the same thing many times, including twice in the last month since returning to school. Only as they entered the Dining Hall this time, Annie felt something different. It was akin to the buzz she noticed the first time the walked in like this, as if they were once more drawing attention to themselves by simply looking different.

It’s entirely possible people know something about me and my training. Most of the B Levels were aware that she was spending time with Isis in the Aerodrome, and that Kerry had been with her the first time, and today. She figured there were rumors floating about, but so far nothing had reached her ears. Whenever anyone asked either of them what she or they were doing, the answer was always the same: flying. Not that we’re misleading anyone with that answer . . .

Kerry held her seat and waited for her to get comfortable before taking the seat to her right. “You still hungry?”

“More now.” Annie unzipped her jacket, shrugged it off, and hung it on the back of her seat. “Particularly after that second flight.”

“Yeah.” Kerry retrieved the short lunch menu in the center of their table. “I wasn’t expecting a quick trip to Ipswich after getting back to the Aerodrome.”

Annie hadn’t either. Upon returning to the school they landed inside the Aerodrome—entering through the same roof entrance Annie had used the week before—and spent about twenty minutes discussing the flight. After going over a few minor issues, Isis told Kerry to saddle up once more, and motioned for Annie to follow her into the open air beyond the Aerodrome.

The moment they were outside they flew up to five hundred meters and struck out on a westerly course. They flew on a direct course for ten kilometers to the train station at Ipswich, paused there for about five minutes so everyone could get their bearings, then covered a fast five kilometers to the Crane Estate at Castle Hill. They touched down in the gardens far away from the mansion, walked around for about thirty minutes, then returned directly to the school. Isis pushed Annie on this last leg, getting her speed up to near one hundred and twenty kilometers and hour, a third more than the sixty and seventy kilometers and hour they’d flown on the first flight.

 

That route was easy to figure out–

Because you know I did.

Because you know I did.

And though not stated above, it was nearly thirty-two kilometers, or twenty miles, right on the dot.  An interesting thing here is the Castle Hill/Crane Estate area.  If you’ve seen The Witches of Eastwick or Flowers in the Attic, you’ve seen the house:  it was the estate used in both movies.  You can also do a wedding there if you have the money.

Or, if you're Annie, Kerry, and Isis, fly in and see the place from this angle.

Or, if you’re Annie, Kerry, and Isis, fly in and see the place from this angle.

Who know, there might be something important about this house–like, owned by The Foundation, or something?  Or maybe someone in the novel will get married there–

Let me see:  are there any couples in this story?

Entering the Big Empty

Let’s just set the bar right now:  yesterday was a miserable day.  I needed to do a lot of running around for one, and that really kept me away from the keyboard.  While I managed to hunt down all the medical prep stuff that I’ll need very soon, and I found a great camera tripod for $50 that I think will come in very handy for me in the future, it also meant that by the time I did all this, and covered lunch, it was close to two before I rolled back to the apartment–

The apartment with no A/C, I should mention.  It crapped out Friday evening.  Friday and Saturday weren’t bad, but yesterday was getting kinda nasty inside, so I had to break down and pick up a high powered tower fan.  It’s keeping me cool at the moment, though once the air starts to stagnate in here, it’s probably going to blow a lot of hot air around.  I’m hoping that after I make my call to the management this morning, they’ll get this probably fixed in a reasonable amount of time.

I also fell asleep reading a book, which is more than likely why I was first up at four AM before drifting off into a fitful sleep–one that was marred by some strange dreams beforehand.  I swear, where are the nice dreams I used to have?  Now it’s all about people ignoring me, and telling me I can’t buy things, and so forth and so on.  And in one case being flat out ignored by someone.

Where are the dreams where I’m asked, “Were you found in a compromising position with a woman who you adore?”  And my answer is . . .

But of course!

But of course!

When I came time to writing I was pretty much out of it, about to fall asleep–and I pushed it hard to get the four hundred and seventy-seven words I show you below, where the kids come into the totally empty Dining Hall after their night class.  Good or bad, it’s all there.  Enjoy as I check out into my own big empty . . .

 

(All excerpts, this page, from The Foundation Chronicles, Book One: A For Advanced, copyright 2013, 2014, by Cassidy Frazee)

Entering the Dining Hall at just past twenty-two hours, Kerry felt, for the first time, the size of the room. He’d seen The Great Hall empty before: during his first night here, before and after taking Annie to the hospital, on a couple of occasions after Astronomy Class, when Annie and he had walked through the Rotunda on their way to the tower instead of taking the Pentagram Wall passage between Åsgårdsreia and Cernunnos, and during the aftermaths of the Midnight Madness.

But he’d never been in the Dining Hall late of night when it was empty. He’d wandered into the hall when it was nearly empty during the day, but those moments didn’t carry as much weight as now, with Wednesday leading her seven students into the hall after the completion of Advanced Spells. Now it struck Kerry like a large, dark cave room, full of darkness and shadows and subdued echoes.

He didn’t find it frightening or intimidating at all: he found it fascinating. The room was one of the oldest sections of the entire school, and Kerry could almost imagine what it was like here, over three hundred years ago, maybe with people sleeping here, or doing some late-night studying, or having a conversation with another students while sharing a midnight snack—

Though he doubted very much that the room was completely empty like it was now.

This is what made the room different from the times Annie and he departed a Midnight Madness. The sofas and chairs and tables and beds were still present when they walked back to Cernunnos Tower. Now there was nothing but empty space: no tables, no chairs, no podium for the Headmistress to address the students from. Even the fireplace at the north of the room was out.

Wednesday walked towards the center of the room close to the fire place, speaking in a normal tone of voice. “New Advanced Spells configuration, please.” In a matter of sections a sofa, a large armchairs, and two love seats appeared before her, all facing each other across a a low oval table. Wednesday pointed a finger at the fireplace; the wood inside erupted into flames before settling down into a nice, cozy fire.

The students found their seats as Wednesday continued standing, looking as though she was waiting for someone. There was a soft pop as a woman teleported into the room, only a couple of meters from the instructors. “Good evening, Professor.”

“Good evening, Zora.” She nodded towards the students. “Could we have grilled cheese and hot cider?”

“The usual servings?”

“Not tonight.” She pointed at Annie and Kerry sitting together in the love seat. “Some new blood joined us. Make that servings for eight.”

“Have it right out for you, Professor.” Zora vanished as Wednesday turned and headed for the arm chair closest to the fireplace.

 

There you have it.  If I can stay awake tonight–and if the apartment isn’t a hot box–I’ll start getting into something interesting in this scene.  At least I hope it’s interesting–

If not, we could get up and dance.  It won't be a Clone Dance--wait!  We can do that here!

If it’s not, I could have the kids get up and dance. It won’t be a Clone Dance–wait! We can do that at this school!