In Dreams: Kerry’s Dream

First off, where in the world am I posting from?

I think you've seen this place before . . .

I think you’ve seen this place before . . .

Oh, yeah:  a deserted rest stop.

Oh, yeah: a deserted rest stop.

I’m in eastern Ohio on my way home for the holidays.  And as such, I’m making my normal stops along the way.

I even look much better than last time--

I even look much better than last time–

Though you need to excuse the crazy eyes.

Though you need to excuse the crazy eyes.

Anyway, about four hours of driving down, and another, oh, six or so to go before I pull into my ancestral home in Northwest Indiana.  Somewhere along the line I’m going to try and write–probably at my next stop–but I’ll consider it a victory if I can get a thousand words in today, because the last time I made this trip I couldn’t write at all once I arrived home.  However, unlike last time I actually managed some sleep this time, so I’m not feeling as if I’m going to crash and burn before the next curve in the road.

The story left off yesterday with Annie admitting that she’d had a vision like Kerry’s–only it happened during their first moment at Memory’s End.  They only speak of the matter for a few seconds before Kerry asks the really important questions.

 

All excerpts, this page, from The Foundation Chronicles, Book One: A For Advanced, copyright 2013, 2014, by Cassidy Frazee)

Annie looked to the sky as she swallowed a couple of times. “Back on Orientation Day. In Memory’s End.”

“Really?” He’d collected himself and his breathing. “When we had our visions?”

“Yes.” She sighed slowly. “Deanna put us both in a trance to see if we’d have visions. When I had mine—” She swallowed. “I saw you coming out of the bathroom towards the bed, towards me. You had your hand on the railing and you were looking down—”

“At the fire.” Kerry didn’t get close to Annie least they find themselves drawn into—something—as they were moments before. “And then you sat down next to me and . . .” She smiled softly as she looked towards the ground. “Well, if you saw what I saw, then you know what happened.”

“Yes.” He nodded as he kept his eyes on Annie. “Hey, wait—um . . .” He ran his hand over his chin. “I wasn’t, um—naked, was I?”

Annie looked up with a wide grin on her face. “Oh, yes.”

Kerry’s entire body clenched for a second. “Really?”

“Well, didn’t you see me naked?”

“Um . . . Yeah.”

“Then it’s only fair.” Annie finally moved closer to her soul mate. “You have nothing to worry about if the vision is any indication.”

He found he was able to chuckled. “Neither do you. Magic probably has something to do with that.”

“Transformation magic, probably. But . . .” She touched his arm gently. “I don’t think we were very old.”

 

Not old plus transformation magic equals pretty hot bods.  One can assume that ’cause Annie’s grinning, and not much brings a smile to her face, right?  They both figure out that their shared vision came on the wedding night before–as Kerry says–“things got serious”.  And the thing is Annie doesn’t need to have all the answers, because someone’s been doing their reading . . .

 

Annie laughed. “You could put it in those terms.” Her seriousness returned. “You saw everything from your point of view?”

“Yes, I did.” He nodded slowly. “And you saw it from yours?”

“Yes. You know what that means?”

After months of pouring through the divination books he’d been giving at the beginning of the school year, Kerry had a very good idea. “If one person has a vision, the best they can hope for is a fifty-fifty chance it’ll come true—”

“Except under unusual circumstances.” Like an accomplished seer having one on a plane the day before it happens.

“More than one person can see a vision, but it’s usually from a third-person point of view—”

Annie nodded. “Which can greatly increase the chances the vision will occur—particularly if they all see it within a few days of each other.”

“But we didn’t see the same thing within a few days of each other.”

“No: it’s been six months.” Annie set her hands on here hips and took several deep breaths. “And we experienced the same thing from our own points of view—”

“As if we were there at the same time.” Kerry knew exactly what this meant. “I think Professor Arrakis would say the odds of us not actually having that vision come true are, like, in the billions.” He looked down and away for just a moment—

 

Wait, Kerry:  why are you looking down and away?  Is something on your mind?  Something, yes:  and on Annie’s mind as well . . .

 

Annie caught something she hadn’t thought Kerry would do—did he grin? She didn’t ask if he had; she thought it better to confirm his belief. “It still might not happen: there are things that could occur between us—”

“I don’t want to go there.” Kerry’s tone turned dark and serious. “It’s not a good idea.”

It hit Annie what Kerry was saying: one of the things that could happen is one of us could die. “You’re right. We shouldn’t talk about that. But . . .” She held Kerry’s hand in hers. “You’re remarkably calm about all of this—it doesn’t bother you?”

He shrugged. “Not really.”

“Nurse Coraline and Deanna said you were agitated when you came in last night.”

“I guess I was—” He pulled his arms in close to his side and seemed to shudder. “But it’s not what you think.”

“What is it, then?”

“I’m not sure myself.” He shook his head. “I just know something bothered me. As for the vision—everything I read said not to try and force or prevent a vision—” He gave Annie the grin that she thought she’d spotted before. “Yes?”

“Yes.”

“Then I won’t.” He let a short laugh escape. “See? I did learn something reading all those books.”

“I can see that you did.” Annie found she wasn’t confused by the way Kerry was acting: she’d known he’d learn something reading the books she gave him. But there was something nagging her— Did I have him read those because I knew we’d talk about this vision one day? Did I know he’d have the same? Or is there another reason?

 

Annie did have a reason for wanting Kerry to read all those books, but now she’s wondering if her reasons were her own.  A very timey-whimy situation here now, because did she want Kerry to read those books–or was there a suggestion?  I’ll probably have an answer for you by the fourth novel.

The thing is, Kerry seems cool with it.  He knows you don’t try to stop or force a vision, and as he indicated, one sure-fire way not to have it come true is for someone to die, and that’s a bit of an extreme way to stop it from happening.

And this leads to Kerry’s rune dream, which I also have written out.  It was the last thing I did before getting ready for the road, and just as I did with Annie’s, here is Kerry’s dream, in its entirety.

 

I’m sitting at the base of my tree.  I know that sounds stupid, but it’s true.  It’s a tree back in California, and I used to go there all the time.  It was a nice place to hang out, because you couldn’t be seen there.

It’s a nice day but cool, like the ones I remember.  I miss this sort of stuff a lot.

“Hi there.”

A voice makes me turn to my left.  A girl’s there.  She got on jeans and sneakers and a Torchwood tee shirt just like I have.  Her hair is red, her eyes green, and there’s lots of freckles.  I’ve never seen her before, but she grins when I look her way.  “Who are you?”

“You know who I am.”  She looked around as if she never heard my question.  “You haven’t been here in a long time.”

It’s kinda weird that she knows about this place, but I just ignore that back.  “Yeah.  Not since leaving for Cardiff.”  And stand up and shake myself off, and a book falls to the ground.

She picks it up and reads the cover.  “A Fall of Moondust.  I should have guessed.”

I take the book from her and hide it against my stomach.  “Just leave that—“

“That’s what you read to her the first time, right?”

I don’t want to hear anything like that.  I try to ignore the comment, but it’s ringing in my head.  “What do you know about that?”

“I know you read it to her when you were about six; I know that you read to her twice more.”  She folds her arms across of stomach.  “I know you really liked reading to her.”

“You don’t know anything.”

“I know that.”  She stands alongside of me.  “I know a lot about you.”

“How do you know?”

“You know how.”  She reaches for my left hand.  “Come on; let’s go for a walk.”

I don’t think about saying no or pulling away from her:  I just take her hand and we walk along van Winkle Drive.  Nothing is moving; there aren’t any real sounds.  And there’s no heat from the sun, though it’s not uncomfortable.  “Where are we going?”

“Just around.”  She started swinging my arm.  “I wanna talk.”

“About?”

“Her.”  She looks at me out from the corner of her eye.  “Your Chestnut Girl.”

I don’t want to hear this:  I really don’t want to talk about her.  “Can we not?”

“Why?  Why don’t you want to talk about her?”  This girl stops swinging our hands and lets me go, so we’re just walking side by side.  “You knew her for a long time.”

“Knew.”  I say it again, louder so she gets the point.  “KNEW.  She’s gone.  She . . .”  I start to choke on the word and say something else.  “She went away.”

“No, she didn’t.”  The girl grabs my arm and stops me, makes me face her.  “She left you.  That’s what you wanted to say.”

I’m getting upset.  Not angry—I never get that way.  Just lost and empty . . .  “Yes, she left me.  She went away, just like my grandparents did.”

“Did they really go away?”

“I never hear from them.  They got a computer—I’ve written to them.”  I turn away, because I’m remembering something else.  “And forget about my parents; they don’t even want me.”

The girl shook her head.  “You just think that—“

“My mother told me she didn’t want me.”  I start crying, ‘cause I can’t ever help myself.  “She told me she wanted a girl.  She told me I wasn’t . . .”  My breath starts hitching; I hate this conversation, because it makes me feel so horrible.  “Why did she say that?  What did I ever do to make her feel that way.”  I turn away from this strange ginger girl and just let it come out, the thing I hate to say.  “Why doesn’t anyone love me?  I just want someone to say they do, just once, and mean it.”  I keep shaking my head.  “That’s all.  Why can’t that happen?”

The girl takes my hand, and I feel the area around us change.  We’re standing just inside the wall entrance from last night—Founder’s Gate.  She leads me through the garden towards the bench where I sat with Annie.  She sits me down and sits on my left, just like Annie did.

“Someone does love you, Kerry.”  She pats the bench.  “Someone who sat right here last night.”

I’ve stopped crying, but I still felt pretty sad.  “I know.”

“She’s just like you in some ways; she wants love and affection, but from the right person.”  She pokes me in the arm.  “From you.”

I remember what happened when we were waiting to go off to our tower together.  “She told me she loves me.”

“Yeah, I know.”

Just like I did last night, I twist around on the bench.  “She told me she has for a long time.”

“Yes, that’s true.”

“How could she?  I never met her until a week ago.”

“And that didn’t stop you from going all over London and Amsterdam with her, did it?”  The girl twisted towards me so we were speaking face-to-face.  “How could she know you?  Look around.  Today you spoke with a sorceress and witches; you saw people flying on brooms; you had a vision . . .”  She chuckled.  “Annie’s a witch, and that means things aren’t what you’re used to seeing.  You gotta stop thinking about things as they were and . . .”  She shrugged.  “Keep an open mind.”

“That’s what Annie told me today.”

“And see what you did?”  Her outfit changed into a black dress with a witch’s hat.  It was kind of unusual, because it look like a Halloween costume.

I almost laughed at her.  “You look like you fit in.”

“Yeah, but you’re the witch.”  She slid up next to me, closer than she’d ever been.  “I know why you’re afraid.”

“What?  Who says I’m afraid?”

“I do—‘cause I know you.”

“You don’t know me.”

She pointed at her head.  “See the witch’s hat?  I know more than you know.”  Her voice got soft, like she was trying to set my mind to ease.  “You’re afraid.  You think you’re gonna open up to Annie, say things to her that will make her want to love you more—and then she’s gonna leave you.  She’s gonna up and vanish like your Chestnut Girl.”

I didn’t want to say anything, but I had to.  “What if she does?”

“You won’t know if you don’t try.”  She looked up at something like she was thinking.  “Why did you kiss Annie last night?”

I shrugged.  “Because it felt like I should.”

“I’m betting because you remembered something, and it just came naturally.”  She leaned over and placed her hand over my heart.  “You know how to love; it’s still here.  But before you can give Annie your heart, you gotta knock down that wall you’ve built around it.”  She leaned back away from me and gave me a look that felt like it was full of pity.  “It’s not gonna be easy, it’s gonna take time, and there will be moments when it’s gonna hurt horribly.”  She sighed like she wanted to say more, but couldn’t.  “And don’t think about your Chestnut Girl—at least not until it’s needed.”

I had no idea what she was talking about.  “What’s that mean?”

“You’ll know when the time comes.”  She stood in front of me and smoothed out her dress.  “Ask Annie to fly with you.  You’ll be surprised what happens.”

Now I laughed.  “You think I can fly?”

“You’re a witch, aren’t you?”  She giggled.  “Witches fly brooms.”

“What if she says no?”

“What if she says yes?”  She stepped closer and laid her hand over my heart again.  “This . . . has nothing to lose if you ask.  Go for it, Kerry.”  She stepped back and smiled.  “Remember:  someone once asked you to go bike riding, and look how that turned out?”

Given when this happened there is some serious foreshadowing going on here, for we know Kerry asked Annie to fly with him, and a few months later he and Annie shared, in a strange way, their dream of him reading to her.  Not only that, but one of the things he mentioned to Annie then pops up here as well.

But bike riding?  What does that mean?  It means that the next scene has Annie asking early on one of the most important questions she’s ever asked:

“Kerry, who’s the Chestnut Girl?”

 

 

NaNo Word Count, 11/21:  2,221

NaNo Total Word Count:  39,619

A Girl and Her Rune Dream

First off, just to prove to you that I do head out to Panera and write, I now have photographic proof, staged as it may be.

 

I believe Dire Straights wrote a song about me in the 70's.

I believe Dire Straits wrote a song about me in the 70’s.

That’s normally what I look like, save for the fact that I don’t have my ear buds in, but that’s due to having to reach over to the other table and get the camera.  You can also see the shiny keys from eight years of typing on this computer–that’s right, eight years.  One day I’ll have to get a new computer–as soon as I find a keyboard layout I like, or I invest in another portable keyboard.

We left off yesterday with Kerry getting the news that his “simple sex dream” was probably a lot more complex than that.  He was sent on his merry way–off to Sorcery, which is a laugh a minute, let me tell ya–and he sent Annie in to do battle with Coraline and Professor Arrakis.  Well, mostly Deanna, because these two do most of the talking . . .

 

All excerpts, this page, from The Foundation Chronicles, Book One: A For Advanced, copyright 2013, 2014, by Cassidy Frazee)

Annie didn’t waste any time getting to the point. “What’s going on? What’s wrong with Kerry?”

Deanna wasn’t interested in wasting time, either. “Kerry came into the hospital last night—”

Coraline stepped in. “There wasn’t anything wrong with him, but he was agitated, a bit upset. He spent most of the night and left in the morning without incident.”

“Annie—” Deanna’s soft voice drew her attention. “Kerry had a dream vision.”

“He did?” Annie couldn’t keep the shock off her face. “And he remembered it?”

“Why wouldn’t he?” Deanna almost grinned.

Annie didn’t know what she should say: she wasn’t aware of Kerry having a dream vision before this. “What was it about?”

“I can’t say, because I told Kerry that I wouldn’t devulge details. I will say, however . . .” He cocked her right eyebrow. “It pertains to your rune dream.”

Annie sat and stared at the seer for a few seconds before she found her voice. “You didn’t tell him that, did you?”

“No, I didn’t. It’s not my place to divulge the contents of your rune dream.”

She looked down at the floor below her feet. “Thank you.”

“However . . .”

She expected she wasn’t going to like what Deanna was going to say next. “Yes?”

“Kerry wants to talk about what he saw—one can tell. He won’t on his own, however, not without some prompting.” Denna drew in a deep breath. “It’s time you both discussed your rune dreams.”

 

Hey, kid:  it’s time to start talking about you dreams.  Hope there wasn’t anything embarrassing in them . . .

 

Annie hadn’t thought of her rune dream in months, but the mere mention of it almost froze her where she sat. “Professor, you know what’s in my dream—”

“Yes, and Kerry’s, too.”

“There are a number of things I’d like to discuss with Kerry, but—” Annie shook her head. “That isn’t one of them.”

“Not even if it’s related to Kerry’s vision?” Deanna turned her head just a little to the right. “You have to talk about them.”

 

Well, then:  it seems Annie doesn’t want Kerry to know all her secrets.  She wants him to remember all their dreams together, but she’s rather he not know about this dream.  Does it involve Bulgarian pop singer?  Hum . . . hard to say.  Well, not really, but she doesn’t want to talk about it–

Sort of.

However, Deanna sort of drops a bomb on Annie–

 

“Yes, I know.” She turned back to Deanna. “Why should we talk about our dreams now?”

“Because I told you, long ago, that you would. I said that the time would come when it would be necessary to discuss what you both saw. Well—” She locked her gaze upon Annie. “That time is now.”

“We can’t wait?”

“No, Annie. Waiting could be detrimental to your relationship.”

Something dropped out of the bottom of Annie stomach. “How so?” Always cool and composed, she felt that composure beginning to slip away. “Are you saying—”

“Not discussing these dreams would be a mistake—particularly your dream. You tell it to Kerry, the chances are good he’ll talk about his vision.” Deanna’s demeanor turned serious. “And then you can compare his to yours.”

It took Annie a few seconds to realize what Deanna was saying. “My vision? The one I had in Memory’s End?”

“Yes.”

Annie couldn’t help letting her voice rise. “How do you know about what happened in that vision?”

Deanna remained as calm as she’d been throughout their discussion. “Because you told me.”

What?” Annie’s breathing slowed and her eyes grew narrow as she focused upon the seer. “I never spoke with you about that vision—”

“Yes, you did.”

“It didn’t take that long.”

“You were in a trance for almost eight minutes.”

The only sound at the table for about ten seconds was Annie’s breathing. “That’s impossible.”

“No: you were in a trace for almost eight minutes. As well as Kerry.” Deanna tossed her head to the side. “It was necessary.”

 

Knowing that Annie never really gets that excited, it’s sort of fun to imagine her voice rising in “agitation” as she realizes that someone has something on her that she doesn’t want known.  And that’s when she learns something else:

 

“What—?” Annie started at Deanna with dawning comprehension. “The tea cups.”

“Yes.”

“You enchanted them.”

“Yes. Stirring the tea would force you both into a trance.”

“Why did you do that?”

“Because the day before, on the flight from Amsterdam, while we were adjusting to Salem time, I had my own vision.” Deanna’s tone turned soft and confidential, such in the way when she’d spoke with Kerry. “Adjustment sleep is dreamless; you are out and you wake up some time later relaxed and refreshed. Only that day I had a vision . . .” She leaned towards the young girl. “Of two children—not returning students, but A Levels who’d come to Memory’s End searching, one said, for answers. The vision told me that while they were visiting they’d fall into a trance and it was possible they’d both experience visions that would change them.”

Deanna sat back against her chair. “When something like that comes over me, under conditions which shouldn’t bring about a vision, I listen to what I shown. Especially when I recognized those students as the same ones who found their way into our private air compartment. And since my vision showed that you’d fall into a trance—” She shrugged one shoulder as she smiled. “I took steps to ensure it’d happen.”

 

When Seers Get Visions . . . they listen.  And Deanna was listening.  So here we have events that popped up about, oh, two hundred thousand words back, coming home to roost more or less.  And when people ask, “So why do you spend so much time plotting out your stories,” this is why.  Because something simple like having tea on Orientation Day with the sweet Muslim Seer leads to–

 

“Did you make us have visions?” Annie found Deanna’s actions astounding—though she wasn’t certain yet if she should be angry or not.

“No one can make you have visions, Annie: there isn’t a seer in the world that can do that.” She shook her head. “No, I only set up the corrected conditions to make it possible, but I had no guaranty it would happen: all my vision show was it was possible my visitors would have a vision.” She held out her hands. “I merely set the table; Kerry and you created the courses.”

“And I—” Annie found the next part difficult to believe. “I told you about my vision?”

“As it was happening.”

WHAT?” She recoiled into her seat. “I told you what I was seeing?”

“Annie . . .” Deanna’s grin spread wide across her face. “You were doing more than seeing.”

 

Um . . . safe to say whatever Annie was seeing, there was a lot more happening.  And it’s something she’s a touch embarrassed about telling Kerry.  I’m guessing–bad cooking class.  Probably.

Annie needs to know something else about this vision Deanna had that led to their visions:

 

Knowing this face gave Annie a dozen different ideas about what Kerry could have seen—and raised another question. “Were the runes enchanted, too?”

“Yes and no. Runes are strong amplifiers, and if a person is inclined to dream visions, they tend to cause the person to reach deep and summon visions that are personally and often kept hidden. There wasn’t any guaranty either of you would have a vision—but if you did, it would be a powerful one.

“No, the enchantment was in place to prevent you from discussing them with each other. I gave you the warning that you were not to talk about them, and that help reinforced that you would.” Deanna set her elbow upon the table and rested her chin on the back of her hand. “As you can see, there was a reason for waiting.”

 

Yeah:  I had to wait for your boyfriend to have his sexy time vision–and it does make one wonder just how much Deanna does know about the kids.  If you’re thinking, “She’s probably had more than one vision about them,” I’m not going to give you an argument.  I’m just not going to confirm your theories.

We head into the wrap up–

 

“Yes.” She stared off into space for a second before getting back to the subject. “What now, Deanna?”

“Here is what you’ll do.” She pointed to Coraline, who was finishing writing something. “Coraline is giving you a tardy pass for Sorcery; we did the same thing for Kerry. Helena won’t question it, so no worry there.

“Once in class Kerry will probably ask you questions about our discussion. Tell him that you can’t talk in class, that you’ll tell him during the walk back.” Deanna smiled. “Which is probably a good thing to do, since Helena would object to your talking.”

“Yes, she would.”

“On the way back to The Pentagram you are to tell Kerry that we discussed the your rune dreams, and that is necessary for you to discuss them alone and in private. Don’t stop to eat: retrieve your runes and go somewhere away from The Pentagram where you’ll be alone and undisturbed.” The seer’s eyes flashed towards the ceiling. “The north shore of Lake Lovecraft has been a good place for you . . .

“Once they, you only need exchange your runes to break the enchantment. Once that’s done, you’ll find you’ll not only be free to discuss, but you’ll remember every detail as if you had them last night.”

 

That Deanna:  she thinks of everything.  So does Annie–

 

“Is there anything that will make discussing mine any easier?” Annie still felt a slight trepidation at the thought of explaining this dream to Kerry.

“Do you know the axiom ‘Be careful what you wish for, it may come true’? Well . . .” Deanna nearly smirked. “This is it made real.”

Annie didn’t want to dwell on her wishes— “Wait—”

“Yes?”

“I just realized something . . .”

Deanna sensed that Annie had already grasped the truth about these dreams. “And that is?”

“You said they were dream visions.” She closed her eyes slowly. “We both had visions—personal ones.”

“That is true, Annie—both about as personal as they get.”

“So what I saw—”

“Was a view of a possible future.” Deanna stretched, trying to work out the knots in her legs. “But after hearing your first vision, I knew that.” She looked down for a few seconds, then regained contract with Annie. “I think our business is finished. You should get on to class.”

 

Yep, you had some strange, personal visions, now it’s time to go to class and wait a few hours before you discuss it with your boyfriend.  But after Annie leaves comes the postscript:

 

After she was certain Annie had left the hospital Coraline stood and stretched. “I hate to say it—” She twisted at the waist a couple of time before facing the coven leader. “If I didn’t know you so well, I’d say you played the hell out of those kids.”

“Ah, but you do know me well, Coraline.” Deanna sat against the table edge. “And it would be wrong of me to ‘play’ them, as you put it.” She shook her head. “No, I prepared the stage, nothing more.” She looked over her shoulder at her friend. “Everything that happened after that was them, indirectly or directly.”

Coraline knew Deanna was telling the truth, and she wouldn’t have gone though the trouble to set up this long game unless there were a good reason—or she’d seen something. “So they’ll talk about these visions?”

Deanna nodded. “As much as Annie might not want to discuss these matters, she will. And so will Kerry.”

“Right.” Coraline cleared her throat. “And you know what happens after that?”

Deanna stared at the privacy enchantment for almost ten seconds, before giving the only answer she could. “Yes.”

 

Yeah, I wouldn’t tell that to either of the kids that you know what’s going on in their lives–or that you may have known about this for months and you’ve been sitting on it because, well, you just can’t tell people about the future, least they try to change it or force it to happen.

With this out of the way, we now get to the meat of the chapter:  the rune dreams.

Remember these?

Remember these?

And first up we’ll find out what Annie doesn’t want Kerry to know.

Probably has something to do with insides trading of Euro Zone stocks.

 

NaNo Word Count, 11/18:  1,890

NaNo Total Word Count:  34,728